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Old 02-15-2015, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
20,862 posts, read 22,433,523 times
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I suppose many people can't tell the difference between the two animals but if you are going to hunt something, you should at least be familiar with what you are hunting so you don't kill something else by mistake.

Grand Canyon's first grey wolf in 70 years killed by coyote hunter | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building
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Old 02-15-2015, 12:53 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,663 posts, read 64,111,757 times
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Coyotes and wolves can look very similar. Since there hadn't been a wolf in the area for 70 years, I'd say it was an honest mistake. It's amazing how far wolves range. Sad, though. A female wolf.
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Old 02-15-2015, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Montgomery County, PA
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A wolf dies. What are we going to do about it?
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Old 02-15-2015, 12:56 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,663 posts, read 64,111,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyRider View Post
A wolf dies. What are we going to do about it?
Well, at least coyote bounty hunters now will be aware there could be surprise wolves in their territory, and hopefully will be more discerning and cautious.
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Old 02-15-2015, 12:58 PM
 
610 posts, read 556,418 times
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Guess that sucks but Animals don't really have rights though.
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Old 02-15-2015, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
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My whole take from this is that if people are going to hunt they should be familiar with what they are hunting. They should also be familiar with the territory. Wolves and coyotes do look alike but there are differences. The fact that this female has been seen in this area is not new information. People around the region are arware of this. There are briefings hunters are supposed to take to learn about what's there to kill and what's not. They are also encouraged to check in with the rangers before hunting where they would be warned. This guy didn't bother. Just a few moments of really taking a look at what he was going to shoot might have made all the difference.

Hopefully, it will educate other hunters but I doubt it.
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Old 02-15-2015, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Elysium
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I remember thirty years ago an elk herd was introduced to Kansas and a first time deer hunter killed multiple elk. I guess he thought he missed.
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Old 02-15-2015, 02:09 PM
 
172 posts, read 167,931 times
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Unfortunate, but not really his fault.
At a distance, through a scope, you're never going to be able to tell the difference and since the wolf was a totally freak outlier in an area where coyotes are a managed herd predator, this outcome isn't exactly shocking.

I can't seem to find it on google but wasn't there a case some years ago of a polar bear hunter who accidentally killed an albino brown bear? I distinctly remember something about that.
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Old 02-15-2015, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Type 0.7 Kardashev
10,577 posts, read 6,823,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
I suppose many people can't tell the difference between the two animals but if you are going to hunt something, you should at least be familiar with what you are hunting so you don't kill something else by mistake.

Grand Canyon's first grey wolf in 70 years killed by coyote hunter | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building
Indeed.

The mistake is not surprising - but only to the extent that it's not unusual behavior to not bother to make sure that what he thought was a coyote was indeed a coyote, based on what I've witnessed. The lazy, selfish, and incorrect behavior I hear about from hunters who either have no shame or are clueless about what they're doing, or those I encounter the rare times I hunt grouse or upland game with someone other than family (it's rare because there are simply so many people out there that I don't want to be around when they're handling a firearm).

If he was uncertain, shame on him for pulling the trigger. If he was 'certain' that it was a coyote, then he was flat-out wrong and shouldn't have been hunting a quarry when he wrongly mistakes with self-perceived certitude another species for it.

It wasn't like he flushed an upland game bird, where you only have a couple of seconds to determine if it's a game species that is in season.

I don't want to condemn the man, but he blew it. And I simply have little patience for people who 'blow it' with a firearm.

All that said, given what did happen he reported it - and kudos to him for coming forward and reporting the mistake. I will give him that.
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Old 02-15-2015, 02:26 PM
 
Location: New York Area
13,402 posts, read 5,203,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
My whole take from this is that if people are going to hunt they should be familiar with what they are hunting. They should also be familiar with the territory. Wolves and coyotes do look alike but there are differences. The fact that this female has been seen in this area is not new information. People around the region are arware of this. There are briefings hunters are supposed to take to learn about what's there to kill and what's not. They are also encouraged to check in with the rangers before hunting where they would be warned. This guy didn't bother. Just a few moments of really taking a look at what he was going to shoot might have made all the difference.

Hopefully, it will educate other hunters but I doubt it.
This is probably a case of shoot, shovel and shut up. It is part of the culture of the West to resist the reintroduction of wolves. Hopefully the reintroduction won't be snuffed out. The wolves are quite necessary for the ecosystem.
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