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Old 02-22-2015, 10:07 AM
 
13,675 posts, read 13,485,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by purplepeach View Post
It's called MANNERS. We say thank you to those who provide a service, and they say.....YOUR WELCOME. No need to cry that people don't understand your tribulations in life. Heck, nobody really understands or knows what sacrifices we've all made. Some worse than others. I'm sure his is not the worst either.
And some would say it's manners to not insert yourself into a complete stranger's day and make assumptions about them so that you can shove your thanks down their throat.

What's wrong with a smile and a "good morning"?
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Old 02-22-2015, 10:09 AM
 
17,066 posts, read 10,046,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MordinSolus View Post
There are a lot of veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars that are very bitter toward civilians and even servicemen who didn't go into combat. I was an Airman during the wars and I never fought anything worse than paper cuts so I caught crap on Army and Marine bases. I would bet that a lot of the bitterness stems from repeated and extended tours of combat and the feeling that the troops were just faceless numbers, to be used and disposed of. They didn't have the equipment they needed, they were security guards for oil installations and civilian contractors(who were making SO much more money than they were), and they saw firsthand how all of the military contractors were ripping off the military for billions of dollars. They also had to deal with all the strain that mercenaries(like Blackwater) added to the situation every time they took out civilians and never faced any consequences. The bitterness is very understandable, albeit misplaced.
That is another thing that merits its own discussion.

There always seemed to be a natural enmity from those in combat MOS' towards non combat types. Especially the infantry, who view all non infantry types as pogues and REMF. There was even a new derogatory term coined during the war in Iraq, "Fobbits," directed at those who stay behind the wire in relative safety.
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Old 02-22-2015, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Home, Home on the Front Range
22,698 posts, read 16,176,460 times
Reputation: 12700
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplepeach View Post
But he voluntarily joined the service. He knew it could lead to war, and we're all aware of the devastating pyschological impact that can have. Yet, he still chose to volounteer.

So stop crying about it. There is all kinds of trauma in the world. He is no more special than others.
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplepeach View Post
It's called MANNERS. We say thank you to those who provide a service, and they say.....YOUR WELCOME. No need to cry that people don't understand your tribulations in life. Heck, nobody really understands or knows what sacrifices we've all made. Some worse than others. I'm sure his is not the worst either.
So basically you are saying that his feelings count for nothing and he should just accept being approached by strangers as part and parcel of what he signed up for?

Too bad if he doesn't like it, right?

How dare he deprive you of the experience of making yourself feel better.

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Old 02-22-2015, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Home, Home on the Front Range
22,698 posts, read 16,176,460 times
Reputation: 12700
Quote:
Originally Posted by txfriend View Post
As a Vietnam vet I personally donít like it and itís awkward. Maybe it makes the person saying it feel better it doesnít give me a warm and fussy feeling. I make it a point not to wear anything that would give the impression that I served for that reason. I donít know who started this BS but it should stop. Just say Hi.
Hi.

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Old 02-22-2015, 10:11 AM
 
13,675 posts, read 13,485,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zenapple View Post
Re: The people who are saying "it was their own choice to serve" - yeah, and the majority of them were barely out of high school when they enlisted. (Not talking about career officers etc.) You read all the time about celebrities or even just local young people who mess up in life, DUI's and whatnot, are "just kids" and "didn't know any better" and "they'll grow up, eventually." Hell, most people think that an 18 year old getting married is committing a huge mistake, they don't know what they're getting into, etc. How do these same people then turn around and think that impressionable, typically low-income teens who are being pursued by recruiters and sign-on bonuses (I know it's not quite like that now, but recently that was the case) should be held accountable to a different standard? I know plenty of people who went to college without the slightest idea about what it would be like, and either partied and ignored their classes, changed majors, transferred, dropped out, moved back home... things you can't do once you sign on to the military. I'm not saying all service members should be idolized, but the argument of "well, they CHOSE to do it" annoys me. It's not like you can just change your mind once you get there and realize you're in a crappy situation that maybe isn't quite as glamorous as you thought it'd be.
That's really why I draw a line between people like cops and firefighters and the military in how I view their jobs. If you're a cop or a firefighter, yeah, you risk your life, but it is very much a conscious choice every day to do so. The day you've had enough, you can walk right off the job with no legal consequences. When you're in the military, you don't have that option.

Being in the military involves a conscious choice to give up many of the freedoms you are ostensibly defending. And when that conscious choice is made by an 18-year-old whom we don't even trust to drink a beer... well, that opens up a whole can of worms.
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Old 02-22-2015, 10:11 AM
 
3,871 posts, read 1,898,844 times
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I sympathize with him. I heard a general call these protestations of gratitude and support for the military "patriotism lite", a way for all those who didn't do anything for their country to feel good about themselves, to cover their own non-contribution with a cloak of gratitude.

Good point, I thought.
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Old 02-22-2015, 10:17 AM
 
286 posts, read 106,562 times
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Thank you to the poster who posted the actual article. In context, I can understand what he's saying. Just look at how quickly people turned on him just in this thread. How dare he not accept 'my' thanks! How ungrateful! It's more about the ones doing the thanking than the soldier.

If he sees it as being insincere at times, he earned that right to feel that way, I don't see him as being ungrateful. Who cares whether or not he volunteered, he still served our country.

Kind of like, support our troops, not just buzz words to throw out to make ourselves feel good.
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Old 02-22-2015, 10:21 AM
 
3,723 posts, read 4,577,621 times
Reputation: 4746
I didn't actually read the article. I just have my own opinion about why people not only feel the need to say thank you but get offended when people point out the typical motivation and understand why it isn't always going to be welcome. Maybe a WWII vet will welcome it, but they don't have the baggage of being ill used.
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Old 02-22-2015, 10:21 AM
Status: "Buttigieg/Beto/Harris 2020!!" (set 11 days ago)
 
7,136 posts, read 2,867,259 times
Reputation: 6086
Quote:
Originally Posted by txfriend View Post
As a Vietnam vet I personally donít like it and itís awkward. Maybe it makes the person saying it feel better it doesnít give me a warm and fussy feeling. I make it a point not to wear anything that would give the impression that I served for that reason. I donít know who started this BS but it should stop. Just say Hi.


Agree! It makes me sad that people now feel the need hide the fact that they served because of this crap. People, it's obnoxious! Cut it with the self-serving military worship.
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Old 02-22-2015, 10:24 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,660 posts, read 6,959,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by purplepeach View Post
Just read an article on MSN about a vet that is offended when people tell him "thanks for your service."
Claims it is empty, thoughtless because anyone who wasn't there doesn't understand, etc.

I say- don't be offended by people who didn't share in that experience. He VOLUNTEERED; it was his choice.

It even says within military groups some militants make fun of the phrase with each other.

Cripes! What the h***do they want us to say to them?? Nothing??

Think of the Vietnam vets- I'm sure they would have loved to hear people thank them for their service.
Who knows? Maybe it's been repeated so often it's become trite, and as happens often when a phrase or expression becomes that commonplace, it may well be that some folks who say it are doing so because that's what "everybody" says and they don't mean it. Kind of in the same category as "have a nice day"?

Personally, if I were a veteran I'd take the thank you as an expression of good will. Like I do when someone tells me to have a nice day.
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