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Old 02-25-2015, 03:58 PM
gg
 
Location: Pittsburgh
16,954 posts, read 17,195,219 times
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She is just another shoplifter on a list, right? What is the big deal? Lots of them out there and if they get caught stores can indeed ban them.
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Old 02-25-2015, 04:41 PM
 
Location: New Market, MD
2,003 posts, read 2,452,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gg View Post
She is just another shoplifter on a list, right? What is the big deal? Lots of them out there and if they get caught stores can indeed ban them.
Did you bother to read the article or this is based on your general knowledge?
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Old 02-25-2015, 05:23 PM
 
38,196 posts, read 15,329,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alpha_1976 View Post
Did you bother to read the article or this is based on your general knowledge?
That article never says the woman isn't a shoplifter. It only says the woman claims not to be a shoplifter.
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Old 02-25-2015, 05:34 PM
gg
 
Location: Pittsburgh
16,954 posts, read 17,195,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alpha_1976 View Post
Did you bother to read the article or this is based on your general knowledge?
Did you read the first paragraph of the article?

Shaquoya Burns was humiliated when a Ross Dress for Less store manager told her that she'd have to leave the Southeast Portland store because she was a known thief banned from Ross locations across the nation, her attorneys say.

Some people DO get banned from stores because of their history of shoplifting. It is what it is. Just another race thingy going on. What else is new?
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Old 02-25-2015, 05:58 PM
 
10,090 posts, read 6,500,984 times
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I didn't know you could sue!? I am white and when I was a teen I got watching, grabbed, falsely accused and detained...never having done a thing. Never had charges. I just looked "alternative" and poor. I wish I knew I could have sued for it
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Old 02-25-2015, 06:12 PM
 
Location: New Market, MD
2,003 posts, read 2,452,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaldoKitty View Post
That article never says the woman isn't a shoplifter. It only says the woman claims not to be a shoplifter.

So she's the same shoplifter and apparently she's on video and still she calls police and when asked by police manager refuses to show and evidence? Now she's to sue the store even though they have all the evidence. Looks like this lady does have some guts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gg View Post
Did you read the first paragraph of the article?

Shaquoya Burns was humiliated when a Ross Dress for Less store manager told her that she'd have to leave the Southeast Portland store because she was a known thief banned from Ross locations across the nation, her attorneys say.

Some people DO get banned from stores because of their history of shoplifting. It is what it is. Just another race thingy going on. What else is new?
You may want to read a little further.
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Old 02-25-2015, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
20,876 posts, read 22,456,852 times
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Her is a link to the actual lawsuit filed by Burns. The manager's actions sound questionable to me as described in paragraph 3.

http://media.oregonlive.com/portland...uoya.burns.pdf


Quote:
On or about June 8, 2014, plaintiff was a business customer at the above-described Ross store when she was approached by manager Lamar Franklin, and asked to leave. He said that she had been identified as a thief and had been trespassed from all Ross location stores around the country, that he had video and pictures to prove it, and that her name appeared on a national database of shoplifters.
If this evidence exists and Franklin had shown it to the cops in the first place, Burns wouldn't have had anything to complain about. But he refused to show the videos and photographs to them. Now he has to show them to the court. If it even exists.

Certainly looking up her name in a national database of shoplifters would be easy enough to do as well but sometimes people's names get put in those things for petty crimes they foolishly committed when they were very young and are never repeated. That doesn't mean they should be banned from shopping forever.

She might have a case if a judge sympathizes with her because apparently there were witnesses who saw him call the cops including her daughter. There is probably more to the story than we are being told. I would like to know the outcome when it goes before a judge.
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Old 02-25-2015, 09:06 PM
 
Location: The World
3,012 posts, read 1,814,076 times
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Even nowadays, the security cameras at many stores don't provide the clearest of footage. I know this for a fact. So, if a description of a suspect is that the person is such-and-such height and such-and-such weight and has a certain hairstyle or type of shoes on, then yes, people who fit that description are probably going to be watched. Is it fair? No. Do I think it's strictly a racial thing? Absolutely not.

Also, as a white female, I remember being watched very carefully in just about every store that I went to when I was a teenager, especially if I was with friends.

Additionally, loss prevention officers are generally trained to watch out for people who are wearing big and baggy clothing. Yes, many people -- including many black people -- wear baggy clothing. So, are some of these customers being watched because of the color of their skin, or are they being watched because of their clothing?

Oh yes, and if I go into a store with a bag from another store, I usually make a point of keeping it in sight or tying it at the top or something because YES, employees and loss prevention DO watch, and I don't feel like being harassed. As a now-middle class white woman, I don't want to give anyone a reason to think anything about me. I suppose I only feel that way because I can't file a lawsuit if I do get approached and questioned.

Last edited by lkmax; 02-25-2015 at 09:25 PM..
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Old 02-25-2015, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Nassau County, NY
20 posts, read 27,472 times
Reputation: 63
I do not know one black person who has not experienced shopping while black. It is almost expected now and most deal with it. Although, I found that I was followed less in stores like Michael Kors, or Bloomingdales and more in stores like liquidators or Cookies. I don't care as long as they are not rude or harass me. I just laugh and think to myself, not all black people steal, do drugs, come from single parent homes, go to jail and are on welfare. Some of us are educated, professional,productive citizens who live a nice suburban existence. I am careful of my appearance and speech as to not come across as ghetto, but I cannot hide my dark skin. I can only remember one time where I was followed and it out right annoyed me. My friend and I were on our way to a class when we stopped in a 711. There were three clerks and other patrons. Immediately, I felt eyes were on us, and one of the clerks took it upon himself to follow us. I grabbed a bag of chips and finally walked to the refridgerator for a sprite and headed to the counter. The clerk who followed us was now standing right next to the counter. After, paying I turned to him and politely said, "Instead, of standing here making sure I pay for this soda, you might want to check out that young white couple in the back of the store stuffing **** in that backpack they're carrying. The look of embarrassment on his face for following two black women while, a white couple who looked like they were on drugs cleared the snack section was priceless.
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Old 02-25-2015, 10:00 PM
 
Location: West of Louisiana, East of New Mexico
2,494 posts, read 1,855,434 times
Reputation: 5628
Quote:
Originally Posted by tickyul View Post
I strongly suspect that any fairly competent loss-prevention-officer is going to quickly get a feel for who is stealing stuff..... and base their actions on this information.
Only if the criminals are black/Latino.

If they discovered that young white women were the thieves in 95% of the cases, I doubt that they'd start profiling young white women. At most, they'd just be suspicious of everyone.

Basically, if black people steal, black people get profiled. If white people steal, everyone gets profiled.
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