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Old 05-01-2015, 11:58 AM
J24
 
Location: Portland, OR
448 posts, read 718,314 times
Reputation: 894

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oh-eve View Post
That just sounds as if you didn't give a crap or the baby came as a surprise and you didn't have time to think of a better name.
So if you name your child John it means you don't give a crap about the baby? Hmm.
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Old 05-01-2015, 12:00 PM
Status: "LILY DALE!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,294,081 times
Reputation: 48877
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAMDWRECK View Post
In the 1960s, Anglo-American names were common among African American children. Pre-emancipation enslaved African Americans were mostly named by owners.

It wasn't until the 1970s and the rise of the Black Power movement, which was a response to 35 years of separate but equal and decades of police brutality and housing discrimination. that this shifted in the other direction. The underlying philosophy of the Black Power movement was to encourage Blacks to accentuate and affirm black culture and fight the claims of black inferiority. The adoption of “black” names is consistent with other cultural changes—like “natural hair"—prompted by the movement. African Americans wanted to distinguish themselves from whites, and develop a culture unique to them naming was an easy means to the end.

40 years later According to a University of Chicago study, résumés with black-sounding names are 50% less likely to get a call back. Black constituents with typically "black-names" are 80% less likely to have white legislator return an email or phone call when their name is revealed.

Chicago GSB | Capital Ideas

Today on twitter "#thingsIput on my resume was trending" and I posted "if your name could be considered ethnic or black I would suggest using your 1st and middle initials instead of your full-name."

I was met with a mirage of resistance which I understand but if it won't get you any further in the work field let only get your foot in the door for the interview what's the argument. I know it's institutionalized racism but it takes decades and policy after policy to reverse that, so what is Kiara or De'Quan supposed to do in the mean time?

On the other hand people were spewing this like "Yeah we can you imagine a CEO name La'Quanda or Merecedes?" and I thought ummmm yes and a President named Barack.

"White people giving their kids names like Saxby Chambliss and Tagg Romney is a clear sign of cultural pathology.” If names like “DeShawn” and “Shanice” are fair targets for ridicule, then the same should be true for “Saxby” and “Tagg.”" - said Jamelle Bouie.

What's your view... should African American's just conform and make it is easy or is pride and ethnocentrism ok and even if you have a "black name you shouldn't initial or avoid it?


I think that this is more of a class issue than a racial issue.

By the way, "Barak" is not a made up name. Nor is it "ghetto". Unless you think that "Olaf", "Patrick", "Maria" "Otto" "Kristen" or "Rocco" are "made up ghetto names".
They are names that reflect the ethnic background of the child.

I don't like overly trendy names or names that have made up spelling.
And I am personally not crazy about overly ethnic names. However, they are a valid choice.

Underclass people have always named their children pompous and pretentious names and whites are no exception to this rule. They also take the names of presidents to whom they are unrelated and expensive stores.

Older poor whites in my area - the mid west - many of whom have parents and grandparents who moved here at the turn of the last century for steel mill jobs - from West Virginia and Kentucky - have some very unusual names.

So far I have encountered - Johnette, Willadean, Normalene, Marquette and Danette among women over 60. Among men - Earl, Duke, and Baron. Also a slew of older white guys named after presidents or named nick names.

This is not new. And it is not a "black thing".
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Old 05-01-2015, 12:00 PM
 
Location: North Texas
24,011 posts, read 32,877,061 times
Reputation: 27549
Two of the best, most conscientious, smartest, and most talented people I have ever worked with had "typical" black names. I still act as a reference for both of them and am happy to do so.

I assume the same thing about people named "Sheniqua" or "LeDonicious" as I do about people named "Baylee" or "Dakota," i.e. that their parents probably aren't very educated or they grew up in a lower middle-class or lower household. That doesn't mean they're unemployable, though. I review resumes on a regular basis and a candidate's name is one of the last things I take note of. I read their job history/qualifications first and once I've decided whether to recommend them for an interview, I read the candidate's name. Sometimes I don't even know whether they're male or female. I don't care.
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Old 05-01-2015, 12:01 PM
 
4,995 posts, read 7,327,627 times
Reputation: 7998
Savannah is not a stripper name.

A stripper name to me is "Lexi" or "Amber"
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Old 05-01-2015, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Saint Louis (Clayton)
241 posts, read 172,407 times
Reputation: 468
Quote:
Originally Posted by J24 View Post
So if you name your child John it means you don't give a crap about the baby? Hmm.
Lol my bestfriend's name is John, and his sisters are Ashley and Sarah and he has a brother name Shawn. I think its a bit far to insinuate that the parent doesn''t care but I think names like that suggest less thought or creativity on the parents part or that its a family name. All of those are presumptions none fact-based.

Just like Blacks are criticized for certain name choices I find it funny when you walk into a predominately white class room and see 8 Ashleys.

Ashley 1
Ashleigh 2
Ashlee 3
Asheley 4 and so on.
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Old 05-01-2015, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
22,602 posts, read 24,191,613 times
Reputation: 49075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fargobound View Post
It's not cute, IMO it's a stripper name like Savannah.
"Mercedes" isn't generally after the car, it's a Hispanic Catholic name honoring the Virgin Mary as Mother of Mercies (Madre de las Mercedes.) Similar names would be Delores (Our Lady of Sorrows,) Pilar (Our Lady of the Pillar,) and Soledad (Our Lady of Solitude.)
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Old 05-01-2015, 12:07 PM
Status: "LILY DALE!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,294,081 times
Reputation: 48877
Quote:
Originally Posted by OptimusPrime69 View Post
Savannah is not a stripper name.

A stripper name to me is "Lexi" or "Amber"

Savannah is the name of a city in GA. I'd put it in the same category as "Dakota".

Lexi is short for Alexis is is not a stripper name.
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Old 05-01-2015, 12:08 PM
 
4,232 posts, read 6,071,023 times
Reputation: 10095
Quote:
Originally Posted by fleetiebelle View Post
"Mercedes" isn't generally after the car, it's a Hispanic Catholic name honoring the Virgin Mary as Mother of Mercies (Nuestra Senora de Mercedes.) Similar names would be Delores (Our Lady of Sorrows,) Pilar (Our Lady of the Pillar,) and Soledad (Our Lady of Solitude.)
It's still a stripper name
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Old 05-01-2015, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Saint Louis (Clayton)
241 posts, read 172,407 times
Reputation: 468
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
So far I have encountered - Johnette, Willadean, Normalene, Marquette and Danette among women over 60. Among men - Earl, Duke, and Baron. Also a slew of older white guys named after presidents or named nick names.

This is not new. And it is not a "black thing".
Not going to lie I kinda like Johnette. I met several Jeanetta's and Johnetta's.
I know its not a black thing that's why I think its hypocritical to call it ghetto.

naming your kid "Kennedy" or "Huntleigh" is just as odd as Beyonce.
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Old 05-01-2015, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,304 posts, read 10,790,738 times
Reputation: 20542
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAMDWRECK View Post
I knew a really really smart girl in high school named Quan'tranae Jenkins. Her life was hell because of it. I wonder what happened to her?
I'm not even sure how to even attempt to pronounce that name! And I absolutely HATE butchering people's names because mine is butchered almost daily. Why would you do that to a person? Seems so cruel. I'd probably ask people to call me Jen since my last was Jenkins.
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