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Old 05-01-2015, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
23,458 posts, read 28,330,599 times
Reputation: 29067

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post
Yeah, I hate the last names for first names trend. Especially for girls. Surnames turned first names like Sloan, Harrison, Parker, Hunter, etc. sound really masculine, especially for girls.
Using last names as first names is not exactly a new idea, though more often for males than females perhaps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chilipepper35 View Post
I worked at one company where there were a bunch of Jennifers.

They all switched it up to keep from driving us crazy.
If my first child had been a girl, she probably would have been a Jennifer (1975). A cousin did use it for his first daughter.

In a similar vein, how many resumes get tossed because the name is feminine? Would a woman named Hunter perhaps get an interview before one named Marybeth, assuming there was no other clue to gender on the CV?
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Old 05-01-2015, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,451,761 times
Reputation: 3262
Your name has nothing to do with it, its really about the attitude you walk in to an interview with. Here is a video I hope helps all of you on your quest for employment.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ECqP9KMqtI
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Old 05-01-2015, 02:43 PM
 
4,426 posts, read 4,076,919 times
Reputation: 3569
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATG5 View Post
Foolishness! These names and the names in the quoted post are names of all respectful, hard-working, tax-paying, law-abiding, red-blooded Americans.

Thats my point and so is Jamal, RaKeisha, Tyrone, Moniuque, Natasha and so on....the point is, black folks should not be judged by their names. I knew a girl that told me their job was just tossing resumes when they saw a name too black or if they lived in a black part of town, they would assume they were ghetto. It was sad, but it is what it is.
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Old 05-01-2015, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Florida
20 posts, read 29,664 times
Reputation: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
I don't like any names that sound made-up or have silly spellings. And I can understand that such names do make an impact when reading a resume. But it has nothing to do with race. Absolutely nothing. Why do some people try to make EVERYTHING a race issue???

I know right? I mean there is no clear reason why a country full of people who don't care about race know Barack Obama's middle name and not Mitt Romney's even though they are both uncommon names. I just looked it up (because I didn't know) and Mitt Romney's middle name is Mitt. His first name is Willard. The man ran for President and was in the news every day( and trust me I was following the election pretty closely) and did not know he wasn't using his first name. Interesting.
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Old 05-01-2015, 02:50 PM
 
62 posts, read 65,911 times
Reputation: 72
Savannah Anne Kathleen Phillips is the Queen of England's first Great-Grandchild born in 2010. I am assuming the two middle names are Savannah's grandmothers as Anne is Savannah's grandma (Princess Anne, the Queen's daughter).
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Old 05-01-2015, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Where I'm At
582 posts, read 938,675 times
Reputation: 1381
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAMDWRECK View Post
In the 1960s, Anglo-American names were common among African American children. Pre-emancipation enslaved African Americans were mostly named by owners.

It wasn't until the 1970s and the rise of the Black Power movement, which was a response to 35 years of separate but equal and decades of police brutality and housing discrimination. that this shifted in the other direction. The underlying philosophy of the Black Power movement was to encourage Blacks to accentuate and affirm black culture and fight the claims of black inferiority. The adoption of “black” names is consistent with other cultural changes—like “natural hair"—prompted by the movement. African Americans wanted to distinguish themselves from whites, and develop a culture unique to them naming was an easy means to the end.

40 years later According to a University of Chicago study, résumés with black-sounding names are 50% less likely to get a call back. Black constituents with typically "black-names" are 80% less likely to have white legislator return an email or phone call when their name is revealed.

Chicago GSB | Capital Ideas

Today on twitter "#thingsIput on my resume was trending" and I posted "if your name could be considered ethnic or black I would suggest using your 1st and middle initials instead of your full-name."

I was met with a mirage of resistance which I understand but if it won't get you any further in the work field let only get your foot in the door for the interview what's the argument. I know it's institutionalized racism but it takes decades and policy after policy to reverse that, so what is Kiara or De'Quan supposed to do in the mean time?

On the other hand people were spewing this like "Yeah we can you imagine a CEO name La'Quanda or Merecedes?" and I thought ummmm yes and a President named Barack.

"White people giving their kids names like Saxby Chambliss and Tagg Romney is a clear sign of cultural pathology.” If names like “DeShawn” and “Shanice” are fair targets for ridicule, then the same should be true for “Saxby” and “Tagg.”" - said Jamelle Bouie.

What's your view... should African American's just conform and make it is easy or is pride and ethnocentrism ok and even if you have a "black name you shouldn't initial or avoid it?

Back in 2004, ABC's 20/20 (Can a 'Black' Name Affect Job Prospects? - ABC News) actually ran a story called “Can a 'Black' Name Affect Job Prospects?” 20/20 asked six black professionals with black-sounding names (Carita, an attotney; Tavoria, a law student; Orpheus, an educator; Arsenetta, a statistician; Tremelle, a financial adviser; and Ebony, an M.B.A. student) to participate in an experiment. They were asked to post two résumés on popular job-search Web sites – one under his or her real name, and the same identical résumé under a made-up, “white-sounding” name like Peter, Melissa, and Kathleen.

Carita (the attorney) was shocked to be receiving calls for her made-up, “white-sounding” counterpart she'd named “Kathleen.” Said Carita, “I was just blown away that Kathleen [who only existed on paper] got phone calls for three of the four weeks of the study, and I didn't get any. And Kathleen does not exist.” Arsenetta's (the statistician) fictitious white alter ego, “Kimberly,” also received calls morning, noon, and night.

A job recruiter for Fortune 500 companies in northern California – who spoke on the condition her name would not be used – revealed an ugly secret: “There is rampant racism everywhere. And people who deny that are being naïve.” The recruiter said if she were given two résumés, all else being equal, except one says Shaniqua, and the other says Jennifer, she would call Jennifer first. The recruiter claimed it's a choice she was trained to make: “When representing certain companies, do not send black candidates. And on a résumé, a name may be the only cue of the applicant's race.”

This résumé experiment was conducted 11 years ago; if it were conducted today, do you think the results would be the same? Absolutely, and anyone who thinks otherwise is either naïve, delusional, or smoking crack.
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Old 05-01-2015, 03:11 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,582 posts, read 2,333,297 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fargobound View Post
It's not cute, IMO it's a stripper name like Savannah.
there was a south park episode where they went to a kids version of hooters and all the waiters names were mercedes, lexus, ferrari, porche, ... and cadillac.
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Old 05-01-2015, 03:27 PM
 
4,232 posts, read 6,069,922 times
Reputation: 10095
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Your name has nothing to do with it, its really about the attitude you walk in to an interview with. Here is a video I hope helps all of you on your quest for employment.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ECqP9KMqtI
What he won't tell you is ghetto sounding names never made it the interview, their resume was thrown in the trash. If I recall there's an entire chapter in Freakanomics about hood rat names and employment.
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Old 05-01-2015, 03:43 PM
Status: "LILY DALE!" (set 9 hours ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,289,071 times
Reputation: 48876
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAMDWRECK View Post
Not going to lie I kinda like Johnette. I met several Jeanetta's and Johnetta's.
I know its not a black thing that's why I think its hypocritical to call it ghetto.

naming your kid "Kennedy" or "Huntleigh" is just as odd as Beyonce.

I agree with both. I thought "Johnette" was sort of pretty - but it is made up. When it's said, it almost sounds like Jeanette.

Kennedy? No. Unless you are a relative. Huntleigh? Sounds like someone trying to hard to get into a country club.

That name "Normalene" sounds like an automotive lubricant, though.
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Old 05-01-2015, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Saint Louis (Clayton)
241 posts, read 172,375 times
Reputation: 468
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
In a similar vein, how many resumes get tossed because the name is feminine? Would a woman named Hunter perhaps get an interview before one named Marybeth, assuming there was no other clue to gender on the CV?
Again my initials theory is key. If you think your name could loose you a job utilize the initials.

JR Blevins or JaQuita Rochelle Blevins?
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