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Old 05-02-2015, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Sugarland
13,255 posts, read 11,850,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgn2013 View Post
Malik and Jamal are Arabic names that just happened to be associated with blacks. The only difference I see is that blacks are inclined to use names from different cultures (northern Europe, west/east/central Africa, Middle East etc.) whereas American whites mostly stick to either John, Madison and Ashley or weird names like Hunter and Declan.
I don't think Hunter is a weird name. I like it. Sounds strong. It would suck to be named Hunter and be a wimpy sort of guy. I've never heard of the name Declan though- is that pronounced like DeckLynn?
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Old 05-02-2015, 08:21 AM
 
24,129 posts, read 17,733,580 times
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Declan is Irish.

Declan - Meaning of Name Declan - Pronounce Declan Irish Boy Name
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Old 05-02-2015, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Not.here
2,828 posts, read 3,459,286 times
Reputation: 2347
This idea about employers being prejudiced in their hiring based on a person's name has become less and less meaningful over the years, especially in urban areas. The trend to adopt originality in names started years ago, plus there are people from all over the world with all sorts of different first and last names all over. In the areas of high tech, medicine and science alone, very large numbers of workers with non-anglo names are very common. These are trends which will only continue. The same is true in other areas of the general population.
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Old 05-02-2015, 08:35 AM
 
18,202 posts, read 9,977,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaldoKitty View Post
No such thing.

Not "anglo american" names what ever that is supposed to mean. They were Christian names. Taken from the Bible. It was once common to ask for last name & Christian name. .
Maybe 50% or fewer were Biblical names. At least as many were Anglo-Saxon or Teutonic origin. There were always a lot of Scotts, Harolds, Williams, Donalds, Raymonds, Ernests, and such. There were also a lot of ancient Roman and Greek names, especially for girls.

And the Biblical names and many others were Anglicized: "James" is not Hebrew, nor is "Michael" or "John."
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Old 05-02-2015, 08:38 AM
 
18,202 posts, read 9,977,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWiseWino View Post
How does one predict twenty years into the future. But if you think that you can perhaps you should consider names in Mandarin.
This may change in the future, but does it seem to be the case that immigrant Chinese and some other east Asians are more likely to name their children a "typical American" name than other groups?
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Old 05-02-2015, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Manhattan, NYC
862 posts, read 587,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magritte25 View Post
Oh you mean the names were changed and twisted to fit the culture using them?
Changed for all languages basically. Marie, Maria, Mary or Mariem should be considered identical.
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Old 05-02-2015, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Manhattan, NYC
862 posts, read 587,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
This may change in the future, but does it seem to be the case that immigrant Chinese and some other east Asians are more likely to name their children a "typical American" name than other groups?
Yes, they are more willing to name their children with such names to ease the integration. I suppose they benefit from the fact that they don't have to affirm any type of black power or identity, having a less controversial History.

The "typical American" name does not seem to have any effect on the community though, i.e. East Asians do like to be together (like many other communities). So I have a feeling this "action" to name their children with such name is only for the job market, not for the community life, in general, of course.
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Old 05-02-2015, 08:56 AM
 
625 posts, read 443,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magritte25 View Post
This screams stupidity to me.

If La'donte de'Shawn is applying for a job and has the qualifications needed, good references etc why should she not be hired? Because of her name. DUMB.
I'm not sure it screams stupidity as it speaks to short-sightedness & prejudice, even if the person is unaware of their prejudice.

And the reality is in many areas with many employers, the person making those decisions can and does screen applications with personal and/or racial biases that will negatively impact ethnic groups other than white Anglo-Saxons.
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Old 05-02-2015, 08:57 AM
 
38,701 posts, read 15,577,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgn2013 View Post
Essentially, the point of this thread is to illustrate that blacks must protect (some) whites from their own racism...... .
One of the more amusing things I think I've heard on this forum lately.

The whole point of this topic is to complain, yet again, about how the blond haired, blue eyed, devils are keeping the Black man down. They apparently spend every waking moment thinking of new ways to do so. Hence the new conspiracy theory of the day, such as the nonsense linked in the OP about anglo-american names.
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Old 05-02-2015, 09:03 AM
 
38,701 posts, read 15,577,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
Maybe 50% or fewer were Biblical names. At least as many were Anglo-Saxon or Teutonic origin. There were always a lot of Scotts, Harolds, Williams, Donalds, Raymonds, Ernests, and such. There were also a lot of ancient Roman and Greek names, especially for girls.

And the Biblical names and many others were Anglicized: "James" is not Hebrew, nor is "Michael" or "John."
What exactly is your definition of Anglo Saxon?
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