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Old 05-02-2015, 07:38 PM
 
27,993 posts, read 19,647,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fat lou View Post
Do you really want to say to your co-worker or employee every day, "Hi, Shaneequa, how are you?" It's ridiculous. If you want your kid to be taken seriously by middle/upper-middle class professional types, don't give her that sort of name. It's that simple.
Um, who ****ing cares what the name is??? I mean, really. People should be considered for what they do instead of what their name is...
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Old 05-02-2015, 07:40 PM
 
27,993 posts, read 19,647,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beccabt View Post
Really? I mean REALLY? Somebody is too lazy to say the word Shaneequa? I suppose they could just say "Hi, how are you" if it required too much brain function to say her actual name. It is literally no harder to say than Rebecca ( which is my name).

Apparently its ok to be too lazy to form certain sounds with your mouth but not ok to have an ethnic name.
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Old 05-02-2015, 07:41 PM
 
27,993 posts, read 19,647,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
I have no problem with African names--and didn't back in the 70s when we first started using them.

But "ghetto" names are not African names.
What is an example of a ghetto name?
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Old 05-02-2015, 07:45 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 2,985,638 times
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I was told by a friend who does hiring for her company that she generally doesn't call people for interviews if she can't pronounce their names over the phone. It's unfair but I guess in a professional setting I don't think I'd want to be fumbling over a name.
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Old 05-02-2015, 07:49 PM
 
Location: P.C.F
1,973 posts, read 1,516,733 times
Reputation: 1602
To start with IIRC Tagg was Sarah Palins and she's a nut job / drama queen.. Every Group Has its nut jobs... As for Ethnic names? If thats what you want ? Go for it.. but your not just turning off white people.. Now answer me this? Would you hire someone Named Bubba ? Thats what I thought .. As for Barack? Maybe its just me ( and I proudly voted for him twice..) but that sounds more Middle Eastern..Than African.. ( its not his fault that his mom was a loose cannon a hippy wannabee) First Impressions.. You have 1 chance to make them, put your best foot forward .. If you feel you need to make a Martyrs stand? Go for it and thanks for opening that job up for me..I agree with your suggestion.. If your First Name suggest "White Trash or Ghetto" ? Go with your initials..You cannot pick your parents but you can pick your fights.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IAMDWRECK View Post
In the 1960s, Anglo-American names were common among African American children. Pre-emancipation enslaved African Americans were mostly named by owners.

It wasn't until the 1970s and the rise of the Black Power movement, which was a response to 35 years of separate but equal and decades of police brutality and housing discrimination. that this shifted in the other direction. The underlying philosophy of the Black Power movement was to encourage Blacks to accentuate and affirm black culture and fight the claims of black inferiority. The adoption of “black” names is consistent with other cultural changes—like “natural hair"—prompted by the movement. African Americans wanted to distinguish themselves from whites, and develop a culture unique to them naming was an easy means to the end.

40 years later According to a University of Chicago study, résumés with black-sounding names are 50% less likely to get a call back. Black constituents with typically "black-names" are 80% less likely to have white legislator return an email or phone call when their name is revealed.

Chicago GSB | Capital Ideas

Today on twitter "#thingsIput on my resume was trending" and I posted "if your name could be considered ethnic or black I would suggest using your 1st and middle initials instead of your full-name."

I was met with a mirage of resistance which I understand but if it won't get you any further in the work field let only get your foot in the door for the interview what's the argument. I know it's institutionalized racism but it takes decades and policy after policy to reverse that, so what is Kiara or De'Quan supposed to do in the mean time?

On the other hand people were spewing this like "Yeah we can you imagine a CEO name La'Quanda or Merecedes?" and I thought ummmm yes and a President named Barack.

"White people giving their kids names like Saxby Chambliss and Tagg Romney is a clear sign of cultural pathology.” If names like “DeShawn” and “Shanice” are fair targets for ridicule, then the same should be true for “Saxby” and “Tagg.”" - said Jamelle Bouie.

What's your view... should African American's just conform and make it is easy or is pride and ethnocentrism ok and even if you have a "black name you shouldn't initial or avoid it?
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Old 05-02-2015, 07:52 PM
 
27,993 posts, read 19,647,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShinyHappyLucy View Post
I was told by a friend who does hiring for her company that she generally doesn't call people for interviews if she can't pronounce their names over the phone. It's unfair but I guess in a professional setting I don't think I'd want to be fumbling over a name.
Yeah because it would be so difficult to learn how to say a name correctly.
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Old 05-02-2015, 08:13 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,572 posts, read 8,742,257 times
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Parents agonize over names because they are important; they convey aspirations, connote social standing, and honor ancestry. A parent who names his first son after his paternal grandfather in accordance with family tradition is sending a message. A parent who casts off that tradition is similarly sending a message. There is a reason so many people around the world are anxiously awaiting the name of the newest royal baby. We can passionately decry the stereotyping of people with certain kinds of names as unfair, which it is, but the reality is that we are judged for better or worse by that small collection of letters all the days of our lives.
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Old 05-02-2015, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Montana
1,718 posts, read 1,527,473 times
Reputation: 5664
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaldoKitty View Post
I once knew a guy whose name was Peter Tester. Parents ought to have thought about that one a little bit more.
I can top that. Knew a guy while I was in the Army named Richard Head, but he went by "Dick." He was a Major when I knew him!
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Old 05-02-2015, 09:02 PM
 
2,439 posts, read 1,034,654 times
Reputation: 1355
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magritte25 View Post
Um, who ****ing cares what the name is??? I mean, really. People should be considered for what they do instead of what their name is...
People hear names like "Shameequa" and they think "ghetto." You can complain all you want, but that's a fact and it isn't going to change. Hearing names like that makes me think of my ghetto high school. And that's not a good thing.

Last edited by fat lou; 05-02-2015 at 09:20 PM..
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Old 05-02-2015, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Gods country
5,324 posts, read 4,006,198 times
Reputation: 7366
I always thought that Homie was a great name.
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