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Old 05-03-2015, 12:27 PM
 
Location: The analog world
17,086 posts, read 9,894,083 times
Reputation: 22750

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Quote:
Originally Posted by IAMDWRECK View Post
ok.... I know a Declyn. He works at my gym. His name is odd and so is the spelling.
The spelling is odd, and the person might be, too, but the name is not, at least if the person is male. May I assume you also think the name Patrick is weird? I admit, though, that when I see the name Declan, I assume the person is Caucasian and probably Catholic, so you've got me there.

Last edited by randomparent; 05-03-2015 at 12:38 PM..
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Old 05-03-2015, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Saint Louis (Clayton)
241 posts, read 172,375 times
Reputation: 468
Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
The spelling is odd, and the person might be, too, but the name is not, at least if the person is male. May I assume you also think the name Patrick is weird?
Patrick is normal. Patrique is NOT. These are 2 different names, Patrique is a weird variant same with Declyn or Ashlee.
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Old 05-03-2015, 12:35 PM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
4,456 posts, read 3,765,630 times
Reputation: 9621
Racism comes in many different vehicles and venues and it remains the responsibility of all people with a conscience to fight it from whatever position they find themselves in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fargobound View Post
It's not cute, IMO it's a stripper name like Savannah.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fleetiebelle View Post
"Mercedes" isn't generally after the car, it's a Hispanic Catholic name honoring the Virgin Mary as Mother of Mercies (Madre de las Mercedes.) Similar names would be Delores (Our Lady of Sorrows,) Pilar (Our Lady of the Pillar,) and Soledad (Our Lady of Solitude.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
Savannah is a stripers name? No kidding! Learned something new today.....I think.
Right? Who knew? I always thought it was biblical in nature meaning "tender mercies".

Quote:
Originally Posted by IAMDWRECK View Post
I have been educated. I always thought of Savannah as a southern debutante name like Scarlett or Virginia
Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
That's what I thought! I even lived in the South and met little girls named Savannah. There's even a beautiful city that's several hundred years old named Savannah. Never thought of stripers when I was there!
Quote:
Originally Posted by OptimusPrime69 View Post
Savannah is not a stripper name.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquamarineblue View Post
Savannah Anne Kathleen Phillips is the Queen of England's first Great-Grandchild born in 2010. I am assuming the two middle names are Savannah's grandmothers as Anne is Savannah's grandma (Princess Anne, the Queen's daughter).
Spanish Meaning:

The name Savannah is a Spanish baby name. In Spanish the meaning of the name Savannah is:
From the open plain.

American Meaning:

The name Savannah is an American baby name. In American the meaning of the name Savannah is: From the open plain.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jgn2013 View Post
This is a great point. A lot of names that seem "black" are Northern European, Arabic, Latin and Greek in origin. If I said my name was Tyrone Gordon, you'd probably envision a black dude. Tyrone is an Irish name and Gordon is a Scottish clan name.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nezlie View Post
Hmm, so based on your thinking what should all immigrants coming into the country also do... change their names to anglo-names at the port of entry?
My children were named after their grandparents and their names are ethnic in origin. In kindergarten one of my sons came home from school one day and told me that he was "changing" his name to Dave, so from then on I was to call him Dave. I said okay, fine, but needless to say whenever I called him Dave, he didn't respond. He missed some dinners and was nearly late for school a few times until he decided he would prefer to keep his given name.

For my daughters, it was not a problem as they were fine with their unusual names, however, they continue to this day in correcting people in pronunciation and sometimes spelling.

I completely agree with the poster who stated that these days the younger generation does not attach any significance to any name because they grew up in the era of huge immigration and self determination by many people. it is a non-issue as far as they are concerned, as it should be.
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Old 05-03-2015, 12:38 PM
 
13,654 posts, read 7,447,566 times
Reputation: 12520
Meh, exotic or hard to pronounce names are most likely to cause a problem for executive positions or possibly high powered white collar jobs. Since the majority of Americans of any race do not have aspirations to reach this level this is much ado about nothing. If people are having troubles in the workplace or acquiring an appropriate job they can always assume a job name while retaining their given name. In the past, many of my clients were foreign small business owners and the majority of them had a work name while on file they had their legal name. NBD, their work names just made it easier for everyone. I suppose they tired early on of having to repeat how to pronounce their given names and instead, chose to be called by Frank or Mike, etc.
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Old 05-03-2015, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
23,458 posts, read 28,339,041 times
Reputation: 29067
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAMDWRECK View Post
Your theory has been blown up. White people make up names all the time. But when an odd name is associated with black cuture it is THEN unacceptable, uncaring, lazy or ghetto. I think Bolocontisha or Quantavius are actually quite creative but they scream Black and to many people Black screams unintelligent.

-Axel
-Phoenix
-Brogan
-Cash
-Diesel

If there is a question worth asking about race and naming, it’s not “why do black people use these names?” it’s “why do we only focus on black people in these conversations?” Indeed, there’s a whole universe of (hacky) jokes premised on the assumed absurdity of so-called “ghetto” names. Derision for these names—and often, the people who have them—is culturally acceptable.
None of those names are "made up".

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourcei...name%20meaning

"Axel is a Scandinavian (Danish, Icelandic, Norwegian & Swedish) and German male given name, which is also used in parts of the English-speaking world. Its origin is ultimately Hebrew, as it is a Germanized version of Absalom."

Phoenix, of course is the name of a mythological bird. More exotic sounding than Robin perhaps, but not made up.

Brogan is an Irish surname and Cash as a surname can be English, Irish, or Scottish. Diesel is German. The engine bearing that name was invented by Rudolph Diesel.

Using surnames as given names is by no means a new thing. There are plenty in my family tree. When DH and I were naming our sons, there was little discussion about the first. He was named for his father and grandfather. For the second we wanted a first name that none of hubby's numerous cousins had already used and one that was easy to say and spell. It turns out it is a given name in my family tree, but I did not know it at the time. We also wanted to call them by their first names (I used what was my middle name until I married and that created problems with people who did not know me). As it turns out, the younger one switched to using his middle name, my maiden name, while he was in graduate school. He has cousins who also have that name as their given name.

However, the names, typically used by black families, that provoke the strongest reaction are those that are truly neologisms that were created because they "sounded" African. They are also, justified or not, linked to lower socioeconomic status.

http://tierneylab.blogs.nytimes.com/...amed-sue/?_r=0

"In another study, Dr. Figlio looked at the effect of names associated with low socioeconomic status. Here’s how he identifies those names:

Four frequent attributes of low socioeconomic status names are particularly striking: (1) the name begins with one of a number of prefixes, such as “lo-“, “ta-“, and “qua-“; (2) the name ends with one of a number of suffixes, such as “-isha” and “-ious”; (3) the name includes an apostrophe; and (4) the name is particularly long, with several low-frequency consonants. The easiest way to characterize this fourth characteristic is to count the number of “Scrabble” points of the name—I consider a name to have a high Scrabble score if its Scrabble value exceeds twenty points
."

Note that a Q and a V will score 14 just for those two letters.

"The more of these attributes a name, Dr. Figlio reports, the more likely the child is to be born to a high school dropout mother, a teenaged mother, unmarried parents, and an impoverished family. To separate the effect of these factors from the effect of the name, Dr. Figlio compared children within the same family: a sibling with one of these names versus a sibling with a more conventional name. He found that the children with the less conventional names scored lower on reading and mathematics tests than their siblings did, a difference that Dr. Figlio hypothesizes is due to their teachers’ lower expectations."

Should hiring be based on qualifications alone? Certainly. But it will undeniably be easier for someone to overcome poverty who does not have to cope with biases toward a name that puts the spotlight on an impoverished background rather than those qualifications. Parents that choose "unconventional" names should be aware that they may be handicapping their children later in life. Overcoming the negative associations of a name may be very difficult.
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Old 05-03-2015, 12:39 PM
 
2,538 posts, read 1,134,843 times
Reputation: 1461
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAMDWRECK View Post
But black children aren’t the only ones with unusual names. People inventing names is actually very, very American, and alot of those names eventually become mainstream (if they are popular amongst the majority)

It’s not hard to find white kids with names like Braelyn and Declyn. And while it’s tempting to chalk this up to poverty—in the thread, there was wide agreement that this was a phenomenon of poor blacks and poor whites—the wealthy are no strangers to unique names. The popular Netflix show Orange is the New Black, written by a Jenji Kohan (a white woman), was based on the experiences of a Piper Kerman (also a white woman). And in last year’s presidential election, nearly 61 million people voted for a Willard Mitt Romney, at the same time that the current head of the Republican National Committee was (and is) a Reince Priebus.

It's only considered ghetto when black people get a little creative.
Look, I don't know what else I can tell you people. Different names convey different sorts of things. Starlene or Jesse James says "white trash." Cletus or Allie Sue says "poor southern redneck." Moon Unit says "hippie weirdo." Mitt Romney or Tucker Trigg says "old money WASP." And the names listed in this thread say "low-class ghetto person." It is what it is, and it ain't what it ain't.
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Old 05-03-2015, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,598,790 times
Reputation: 27566
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post

But parents that choose "unconventional" names should be aware that they may be handicapping their children later in life. Overcoming the negative associations of a name may be very difficult.

I Gave My Daughter A Ghetto Name And I Regret It | MadameNoire
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Old 05-03-2015, 12:53 PM
 
1,372 posts, read 1,382,593 times
Reputation: 4141
I've passed on hiring some people with unusual names, I don't care if the name is Moon Beam or Sheniqua, my thought is these people have some real emotional scars from these names and I just don't need the extra drama
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Old 05-03-2015, 01:22 PM
 
45,507 posts, read 18,030,591 times
Reputation: 19024
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAMDWRECK View Post
Patrick is normal. Patrique is NOT. These are 2 different names, Patrique is a weird variant same with Declyn or Ashlee.
You are incorrect. Patrique is the French spelling of Patrick.

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick
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Old 05-03-2015, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Sugarland
13,761 posts, read 12,755,501 times
Reputation: 16629
Quote:
Originally Posted by wpme View Post
I've passed on hiring some people with unusual names, I don't care if the name is Moon Beam or Sheniqua, my thought is these people have some real emotional scars from these names and I just don't need the extra drama
My thought is that you are coming up with silly excuses to justify your biases. Try focusing on their qualifications and not these fictional "emotional scars" you are making up in your head.
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