U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-09-2015, 10:46 AM
bjh
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
26,466 posts, read 22,864,618 times
Reputation: 119885

Advertisements

This is not the first story of this kind. There are all sorts of medical issues that can't be seen by the casual observer. Heart arrhythmia, early stage MS or Parkinsons, orthopedic issues that don't require a cane or walker, but can be problematic with too much walking. Anyone observing someone with a handicap tag or sign should just be glad they don't have a medical condition that can benefit by a shorter walk. Those that leave notes like these on others' vehicles are still operating at the emotional level of a childish brat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-09-2015, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood, DE and beautiful SXM!
12,054 posts, read 19,701,393 times
Reputation: 31734
I have no idea whether fibromyalgia is worthy of special parking privileges; however, I do know several people who have been diagnosed with it and they don't seem to need that privilege.

What I do see in the U.S. is that too many people have the placards and continue to use them long after it is needed. As some one who was critically hurt in a work accident, I welcome the opportunity to walk when I can. I go to the YMCA every day and all of our handicapped spaces are full and I am just amazed at the workouts these disabled people can do. I can barely make it through our Friday Zumba class, but some of our "handicapped" members are so good that they are invited on stage with the instructor. Things like this make people angry and I can understand the anger of the person who left the note, even though I would not have done so.

DH's doctors asked him if he wanted a handicapped license plate when he was going through treatment for two forms of stage 4 cancer. He told them that he hoped that they were better doctors and that he would never need the special license plate.

I do believe there should be a better way of monitoring who has the plates and placards and who long they should have them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2015, 11:41 AM
 
Location: P.C.F
1,973 posts, read 1,526,461 times
Reputation: 1602
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Data Guy View Post
Most stereotypes are based on some truth. Don't pretend it isn't a common sight at Walmart. You'd be lying to yourself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2015, 11:42 AM
 
1,039 posts, read 1,321,232 times
Reputation: 1264
Quote:
Originally Posted by apexgds View Post
Frankly, I'm sick of perfect strangers playing "handicapped parking police." There's no way for anyone to look at a person and know whether or not they have reason to use a handicapped spot. If they have a valid placard, that should be sufficient.

Many, many moons ago, I drove my elderly grandmother to a hair appointment. We took her car because she got around with a walker and had permanent handicapped parking plates. Knowing it would take a while to wash/cut/set/sit under the dryer/tease/spray into helmet form, I decided to run some errands. Upon returning to the shopping center to pick her up, I parked in a handicapped spot (I was, afterall, picking up an elderly woman with a walker). As I was walking in, a couple of ladies walked by, and one of them said something akin to "handicapped, my a$$." Now, if this had happened to 40-something me, I probably would have gotten into some sort of verbal battle with her, but the early 20-something me was mortified (it was embarrassing enough to be 20 and driving a huge granny car and parking handicapped! LOL)

I also think of my college roommate ... formerly a very trim, active woman. She was diagnosed a couple years ago with a degenerative disease that causes a great deal of pain through her back and hips. She'll start out the day moving rather well, minimal limping, and by the end of the day she can barely move. The steroids and other medications she had to go on caused her weight to balloon. More than a few times, she's had people comment on how being fat isn't enough reason to use handicapped parking. She doesn't use handicapped parking because of her weight, she uses it because she's in pain.

People need to mind their own d*mn business.

Totally agree with your statements! People can't have much to do if the best they can think of are leaving "you're fat and ugly" notes on cars where they have "a hunch" that the person doesn't really have a handicap. One day they might have a disability themselves, and boy will the tune change then. Some people are just plain mean.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2015, 11:44 AM
 
14,253 posts, read 14,799,430 times
Reputation: 13621
Quote:
Originally Posted by SXMGirl View Post
I have no idea whether fibromyalgia is worthy of special parking privileges; however, I do know several people who have been diagnosed with it and they don't seem to need that privilege.

What I do see in the U.S. is that too many people have the placards and continue to use them long after it is needed. As some one who was critically hurt in a work accident, I welcome the opportunity to walk when I can. I go to the YMCA every day and all of our handicapped spaces are full and I am just amazed at the workouts these disabled people can do. I can barely make it through our Friday Zumba class, but some of our "handicapped" members are so good that they are invited on stage with the instructor. Things like this make people angry and I can understand the anger of the person who left the note, even though I would not have done so.

DH's doctors asked him if he wanted a handicapped license plate when he was going through treatment for two forms of stage 4 cancer. He told them that he hoped that they were better doctors and that he would never need the special license plate.

I do believe there should be a better way of monitoring who has the plates and placards and who long they should have them.
I agree.

My brother-in-law had a handicapped plate and there was nothing physically wrong with him. I think the privilege is over-used and over-abused.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2015, 11:47 AM
 
Location: P.C.F
1,973 posts, read 1,526,461 times
Reputation: 1602
Thats what the cheaters tell themselves everytime they use one .. even having the placard means nothing except they somehow have access to one....

Quote:
Originally Posted by apexgds View Post
Frankly, I'm sick of perfect strangers playing "handicapped parking police." There's no way for anyone to look at a person and know whether or not they have reason to use a handicapped spot. If they have a valid placard, that should be sufficient.

Many, many moons ago, I drove my elderly grandmother to a hair appointment. We took her car because she got around with a walker and had permanent handicapped parking plates. Knowing it would take a while to wash/cut/set/sit under the dryer/tease/spray into helmet form, I decided to run some errands. Upon returning to the shopping center to pick her up, I parked in a handicapped spot (I was, afterall, picking up an elderly woman with a walker). As I was walking in, a couple of ladies walked by, and one of them said something akin to "handicapped, my a$$." Now, if this had happened to 40-something me, I probably would have gotten into some sort of verbal battle with her, but the early 20-something me was mortified (it was embarrassing enough to be 20 and driving a huge granny car and parking handicapped! LOL)

I also think of my college roommate ... formerly a very trim, active woman. She was diagnosed a couple years ago with a degenerative disease that causes a great deal of pain through her back and hips. She'll start out the day moving rather well, minimal limping, and by the end of the day she can barely move. The steroids and other medications she had to go on caused her weight to balloon. More than a few times, she's had people comment on how being fat isn't enough reason to use handicapped parking. She doesn't use handicapped parking because of her weight, she uses it because she's in pain.

People need to mind their own d*mn business.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2015, 12:00 PM
 
5,296 posts, read 2,906,536 times
Reputation: 13251
People would be better off if they minded their own business in circumstances like these. There's simply no way to diagnose a person in a parking lot. A little kindness really doesn't hurt. It's better than making biased assumptions and then finding out that you were wrong and the person really does need that disabled parking spot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2015, 12:05 PM
 
5,574 posts, read 5,566,604 times
Reputation: 16473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macgregorsailor51 View Post
Thats what the cheaters tell themselves everytime they use one .. even having the placard means nothing except they somehow have access to one....
Yes, there are cheaters, but you have no way of looking at someone and knowing whether or not they're cheating. So people should mind their own business. If someone thinks there's some flagrant abuse happening, call the police and let them sort it out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2015, 12:11 PM
 
26,163 posts, read 14,544,369 times
Reputation: 17235
Angry  

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburban_Guy
I sympathize with her conditions, BUT, a few things are a bit off for me (such as no blue sticker/placard, though it's not required on private property)
Thats horrible....... Probably made her cry


Mean sadastic people!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2015, 12:14 PM
 
5,565 posts, read 2,292,518 times
Reputation: 5229
Quote:
Originally Posted by apexgds View Post
Frankly, I'm sick of perfect strangers playing "handicapped parking police." There's no way for anyone to look at a person and know whether or not they have reason to use a handicapped spot. If they have a valid placard, that should be sufficient.

Many, many moons ago, I drove my elderly grandmother to a hair appointment. We took her car because she got around with a walker and had permanent handicapped parking plates. Knowing it would take a while to wash/cut/set/sit under the dryer/tease/spray into helmet form, I decided to run some errands. Upon returning to the shopping center to pick her up, I parked in a handicapped spot (I was, afterall, picking up an elderly woman with a walker). As I was walking in, a couple of ladies walked by, and one of them said something akin to "handicapped, my a$$." Now, if this had happened to 40-something me, I probably would have gotten into some sort of verbal battle with her, but the early 20-something me was mortified (it was embarrassing enough to be 20 and driving a huge granny car and parking handicapped! LOL)

I also think of my college roommate ... formerly a very trim, active woman. She was diagnosed a couple years ago with a degenerative disease that causes a great deal of pain through her back and hips. She'll start out the day moving rather well, minimal limping, and by the end of the day she can barely move. The steroids and other medications she had to go on caused her weight to balloon. More than a few times, she's had people comment on how being fat isn't enough reason to use handicapped parking. She doesn't use handicapped parking because of her weight, she uses it because she's in pain.

People need to mind their own d*mn business.
100% yes!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top