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Old 07-22-2015, 07:33 AM
 
Location: St Louis, MO
4,677 posts, read 4,818,027 times
Reputation: 2971

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
It's not like they CAN'T refuse this limited coverage and go get their own more comprehensive coverage. Apparently for whatever reason, they are choosing not to do so, but no law on this earth prohibits them from doing so.
It is _exactly_ like that if they are under 26. There _are_ laws that give their parents control of their insurance if they are under 26. There are some ways out, the easiest being to join the military, get pregnant, or get married.
(Also legal emancipation, but obviously that is not available once you turn 18, putting you in a legal no man's land where there are not court based options to disconnect from your parents.)
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Old 07-22-2015, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,721 posts, read 36,145,910 times
Reputation: 63325
Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
It is _exactly_ like that if they are under 26. There _are_ laws that give their parents control of their insurance if they are under 26 (and not pregnant or married, which would be the two quickest ways out).
Are you telling me that a parent can legally force an adult child to remain on their insurance plan? Are you saying that an adult child cannot buy their own insurance plan if their parent, for some reason, has them on their plan? Please provide a source to support this assertion if this is what you're saying.

I think this could be fixed with about two phone calls. They'd go something like this:

"Parents' insurance plan provider, I am an adult and do not want to be on this insurance plan. Remove me."

"New insurance provider, I'd like to purchase health insurance from you."

By the way, married people under age 26 can still be on their parents' plans.
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Old 07-22-2015, 07:58 AM
 
38,133 posts, read 14,902,572 times
Reputation: 24580
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
These women are adults. Why do people expect their daddy to provide them with birth control?
I suspect they are under 26 and therefore able to stay on their father's insurance while they are in college or getting their feet on the ground with a career. Many entry level jobs do not provide health insurance.

It is unclear if they expect their father to provide birth control. The father wants insurance companies to not cover birth control for his daughters or anyone else's daughters either.

IMO, this is a bridge too far.

If he does not want his insurance to provide birth control for his daughters, then tell the daughters if they use the insurance for birth control, they lose their insurance through him. Seems simple enough way to control behavior he does not approve of.
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Old 07-22-2015, 08:00 AM
 
38,133 posts, read 14,902,572 times
Reputation: 24580
Health insurance covers all sorts of procedures and pills that people never use. You don't have to get a colonoscopy, blood transfusion, antidepressants... But does that mean no one else gets them either?
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Old 07-22-2015, 08:01 AM
 
508 posts, read 551,953 times
Reputation: 1398
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregW View Post
The daughters need to get away from this controlling jerk ASAP. They should just walk away and let him get old alone.
One way or the other - no grandkids for him!

Seriously this is the dumbest thing I've ever heard of. The faster this jerk gets shut down, the better. Hopefully his daughters get the lay of the land and cut him out of their lives forever.
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Old 07-22-2015, 08:02 AM
 
Location: St Louis, MO
4,677 posts, read 4,818,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Are you telling me that a parent can legally force an adult child to remain on their insurance plan? Are you saying that an adult child cannot buy their own insurance plan if their parent, for some reason, has them on their plan?
They can buy their own plan. But their parents can keep them on their plan and choose to have that plan as primary. The new plan becomes a secondary plan, which still has all of the same complications as above; the child is still taking an off-plan prescription drug for their primary plan.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I think this could be fixed with about two phone calls. They'd go something like this:
"Parents' insurance plan provider, I am an adult and do not want to be on this insurance plan. Remove me."
"New insurance provider, I'd like to purchase health insurance from you."
It should be that easy. Dealing with a parent who claims you as a dependent or refuses to file financial aid info should be that easy too. It isn't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
By the way, married people under age 26 can still be on their parents' plans.
Yes, but getting married, pregnant, or entering the military removes that pseudo-dependent status allowing you to choose to remove yourself from their insurance.
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Old 07-22-2015, 08:02 AM
 
508 posts, read 551,953 times
Reputation: 1398
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
I suspect they are under 26 and therefore able to stay on their father's insurance while they are in college or getting their feet on the ground with a career. Many entry level jobs do not provide health insurance.

It is unclear if they expect their father to provide birth control. The father wants insurance companies to not cover birth control for his daughters or anyone else's daughters either.

IMO, this is a bridge too far.

If he does not want his insurance to provide birth control for his daughters, then tell the daughters if they use the insurance for birth control, they lose their insurance through him. Seems simple enough way to control behavior he does not approve of.
Actually he has no way of knowing what medical care his daughters get as - since they are adults - privacy laws prevent his access to their medical records, INCLUDING what insurance is paying for.

Yay, HIPPA!
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Old 07-22-2015, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,721 posts, read 36,145,910 times
Reputation: 63325
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
I suspect they are under 26 and therefore able to stay on their father's insurance while they are in college or getting their feet on the ground with a career. Many entry level jobs do not provide health insurance.

It is unclear if they expect their father to provide birth control. The father wants insurance companies to not cover birth control for his daughters or anyone else's daughters either.

IMO, this is a bridge too far.

If he does not want his insurance to provide birth control for his daughters, then tell the daughters if they use the insurance for birth control, they lose their insurance through him. Seems simple enough way to control behavior he does not approve of.
The father isn't trying to stop all coverage for birth control from all insurance companies.

I agree that he should tell his adult daughters that if they don't like the insurance he's providing, then they should pay for their own insurance.

If they are truly unable to afford health care coverage then they will qualify for subsidies via the ACA. Of course, they may not WANT to buy their own coverage but that's a whole other story. Or maybe it's not.
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Old 07-22-2015, 08:09 AM
 
508 posts, read 551,953 times
Reputation: 1398
Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
<snip>
It should be that easy. Dealing with a parent who claims you as a dependent or refuses to file financial aid info should be that easy too. It isn't.
<snip>
Tell me about it. I was kicked out by my mother when I was 17, just before I graduated from high school. I then had to work my way through college on my own, as my mother continued to claim me as a dependent for however long that was allowed back then (early 70's).

In the meantime, I could not get financial aid as an independent student because my parents were claiming me as a dependent.

Yes, I could have turned them in for tax fraud - but then my FATHER would have gone to jail (not my mother).

Even if they HADN'T been claiming me as a dependent, I would have had to provide an affadavit signed by them that they were not providing support for me until I attained the age of 21, which in that state at that time was the age of full legal adulthood - which I couldn't get as I had been turned out of the house and my mother refused to have anything to do with me - and I couldn't get to my dad without going through her first.
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Old 07-22-2015, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,721 posts, read 36,145,910 times
Reputation: 63325
Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
They can buy their own plan. But their parents can keep them on their plan and choose to have that plan as primary. The new plan becomes a secondary plan, which still has all of the same complications as above; the child is still taking an off-plan prescription drug for their primary plan.


It should be that easy. Dealing with a parent who claims you as a dependent or refuses to file financial aid info should be that easy too. It isn't.

Please provide a source showing that parents can force an adult child to remain on their plan or carry their plan as the primary plan, if the adult child wants their own plan.

Adult children do not have to stay on their parents' plans. Or on their parents' tax returns. Of course, this may require a confrontation or even reporting the parents to the IRS. But sometimes adults have to make adult decisions and establish healthy boundaries with other adults - including their parents.

Quote:
Yes, but getting married, pregnant, or entering the military removes that pseudo-dependent status allowing you to choose to remove yourself from their insurance.
My point is that you don't have to do any of those things to remove yourself from a parents' insurance, or to purchase your own primary plan. Parents do not have the right or obligation to force an insurance plan on their adult children. Adults can purchase their own insurance if they don't want to be covered by their parents' plan.
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