U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-19-2015, 07:34 PM
 
2,415 posts, read 2,431,053 times
Reputation: 2854

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
I am 67.

I knew several of my great aunts and uncles who were born in the 1890s.

My mother's mother's father was born in 1872. I was four when he died, but I do not have personal memories of him. I do have a picture of him holding me when I was a small infant.

My husband's mother's mother was born in 1895. Not only do I remember her, so do my children. His father's mother was born in 1893. She was already very ill when I met her the first time and died soon after that.

If you think about it, all of us who are now in our 60s must have met people when we were small who were born in the nineteenth century, even if we do not remember them.

Your thread is timely. I was just thinking recently that my grandchildren stand a good chance of living into the 22nd century.

And I believe I recall it being conveyed in the media and on the web in the past few years or less that biological/life scientists reasonably surmise or predict that life expectancy can prospectively be increased to have some people (or more than some) live to previously unaccomplished ages (perhaps 150 to 180 or 200 or more years?) . . . with advances in medical science. That is, at least in the "foreseeable" future. As to the more distant future (re: centuries ahead), who knows what could be possible?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-19-2015, 08:19 PM
 
2,415 posts, read 2,431,053 times
Reputation: 2854
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass Chalice View Post
This seems quite far fetched, as any former slaves you would have come into contact with after 1960 would be at least 95 years old, assuming they were born in the last year of the civil war, 1865.
It is not uncommon for multiple persons (even within our own lifetimes) to live to 95 or more (even over 100). I have known a host of them personally and then, through the media over the years, we learn of others (e.g., celebrities, entertainers, politicians, just common everyday folks) who reached or even passed 100. I have some in my greater family tree who are already deceased that lived past 95 and then some still alive who are that age or older. And I'm sure so do a goodly number of other people know of such people personally.

Last edited by UsAll; 09-19-2015 at 08:43 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2015, 08:47 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,749 posts, read 9,053,224 times
Reputation: 11169
This is interesting. I remember being in 5th grade on a field trip to interview people at an assisted living home. We interviewed a guy who was born in 1896. We were fascinated as 11 year olds to be talking to someone born in the 1800s. He was almost 97 at the time and I think he lived to be 100. I have a centenarian great aunt who is 102 and has memories of the 1920s and was living on a farm during the Depression.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2015, 08:56 PM
 
2,415 posts, read 2,431,053 times
Reputation: 2854
Quote:
Originally Posted by HOSS429 View Post
i remember my mothers father well ..
To think that John Hyatt was born just a smidgeon after the U.S. Civil War ended and he lived into the era of rock n' roll and the hippies, the beatniks, lived before the electric light or radio or TV or automobile etc. was invented, and other notable milestones in human history that came since that changed the course of human history. What a perspective he must have had!

Last edited by UsAll; 09-19-2015 at 09:05 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-20-2015, 12:40 AM
 
Location: Retired in Malibu/La Quinta/Flagstaff
1,324 posts, read 1,331,096 times
Reputation: 4389
Both my paternal grandparents were born in 1882. My grandfather died when I was two. My grandmother died at the age of 94 in 1976. She remembered reading about the Wright Brothers first powered flight in 1903. 66 years later, I was sitting next to her as we watched TV and witnessed Neil Armstrong take his first step on the Moon.

Both my maternal grandparents were born in 1887. My grandfather died in 1973 at the age of 86. My grandmother died in 1989 at the age of 102.

Growing up, I lived across the street from an elderly widower, who immigrated with his family from Germany. One summer day in 1958 when I was seven years old, I was sitting on our front porch, reading a book about General Custer. My neighbor walked by and joined me on our front porch. I told him who I was reading about and he told me he remembered reading about Custer's Last Stand in the newspaper. I asked him what year he was born and he said 1863. He was 95 years old!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-20-2015, 01:07 AM
 
2,415 posts, read 2,431,053 times
Reputation: 2854
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrolman View Post
Both my paternal grandparents were born in 1882. My grandfather died when I was two. My grandmother died at the age of 94 in 1976. She remembered reading about the Wright Brothers first powered flight in 1903. 66 years later, I was sitting next to her as we watched TV and witnessed Neil Armstrong take his first step on the Moon.

Both my maternal grandparents were born in 1887. My grandfather died in 1973 at the age of 86. My grandmother died in 1989 at the age of 102.

Growing up, I lived across the street from an elderly widower, who immigrated with his family from Germany. One summer day in 1958 when I was seven years old, I was sitting on our front porch, reading a book about General Custer. My neighbor walked by and joined me on our front porch. I told him who I was reading about and he told me he remembered reading about Custer's Last Stand in the newspaper. I asked him what year he was born and he said 1863. He was 95 years old!
Incredible! Speaking to someone born in 1863. Almost like being on a "Star Trek" episode and meeting a time traveller from the past or the future.

In recent times, I saw on the web (perhaps on YouTube?) a video from a old TV show from the late 1950s - early 1960s (I was born in 1954) called "What's My Line". They had a mystery guest come on the show (perhaps 1958 or 1959?) who was a quite-old man and the panel's job was to guess what his secret or life story was. It turns out that, as a young boy, he was at the Ford Theatre in Washington, D.C. in 1865 when John Wilkes Booth shot and assassinated Abraham Lincoln and then Booth jumped from the balcony down to the stage to escape. He witnessed all this as a young boy! And here he is talking about it to a studio audience on television in perhaps 1958 or 1959. Unbelievable!!


P.S.-- When I was a youth, I thought for a while that Abraham Lincoln was Jewish. You see, they said in class that he was shot in the temple. I thought to myself "What was he doing at a temple?" I figured that this indicated that he must have been Jewish (!). Talk about misconstruing what one is told!

Last edited by UsAll; 09-20-2015 at 01:49 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-20-2015, 02:55 AM
 
10,126 posts, read 6,335,849 times
Reputation: 8429
I remember several people that were born in the late 1880's or the 1890's. I don't recall knowing anyone born prior to that though. Some of my gg aunts and uncles that were born in the 1890's made it to the 1970's and 1980's. Talk about characters, they were a hoot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-20-2015, 03:22 AM
 
Location: Retired in Malibu/La Quinta/Flagstaff
1,324 posts, read 1,331,096 times
Reputation: 4389
Quote:
Originally Posted by UsAll View Post
In recent times, I saw on the web (perhaps on YouTube?) a video from a old TV show from the late 1950s - early 1960s (I was born in 1954) called "What's My Line". They had a mystery guest come on the show (perhaps 1958 or 1959?) who was a quite-old man and the panel's job was to guess what his secret or life story was. It turns out that, as a young boy, he was at the Ford Theatre in Washington, D.C. in 1865 when John Wilkes Booth shot and assassinated Abraham Lincoln and then Booth jumped from the balcony down to the stage to escape. He witnessed all this as a young boy! And here he is talking about it to a studio audience on television in perhaps 1958 or 1959. Unbelievable!![/b]
UsAll, you are referring to Samuel J. Seymour's appearance on "I've Got A Secret" which was hosted by Garry Moore. That episode was filmed in early 1956, two months before Mr. Seymour died. He was the last surviving witness to President Lincoln's assassination. I found it fascinating, too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-20-2015, 03:49 AM
 
2,415 posts, read 2,431,053 times
Reputation: 2854
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrolman View Post
UsAll, you are referring to Samuel J. Seymour's appearance on "I've Got A Secret" which was hosted by Garry Moore. That episode was filmed in early 1956, two months before Mr. Seymour died. He was the last surviving witness to President Lincoln's assassination. I found it fascinating, too.

Thank you for sharing this with me, Patrolman. Perhaps I can share the video of this TV show episode from 1956 with others to see how impressed they are by this event.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-20-2015, 04:19 AM
 
Location: Purgatory
6,322 posts, read 4,768,757 times
Reputation: 9765
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodrow LI View Post
Although I knew my Mother's Parents very well, I do not know the years they were born in, but both were young adults when they came to the USA in 1895. Probably born aroung 1875.

When I lived in Louisiana in the 1960s I met several people that had been slaves.

As a very young child in New Britain Ct I remember my school having a man, who was present when Liconln gave hin Gettysburg address, come and give a presentation.. I also met several Civil War veterans.

WOW! For some reason the 1900 thing is not surprising to me but actually MEETING ACTUAL FORMER SLAVES is crazy!!

I often think about how I am part of the last generation to know "life before the Internet" ( meaning it being used by the public as more than a novelty) just like I used to think of how crazy it was that my grandparents knew a time before TV!

I knew an old neighbor who died in 2010 at 103. It's amazing to me to think that she was alive during WWI. I wish I got to know her life story more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top