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Old 09-20-2015, 04:44 PM
 
3,730 posts, read 2,136,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rugrats2001 View Post
Wow. Just wow.

I'm in my 50's, and I can remember when Veterans Day parades had LOTS of World War I soldiers marching in them. Now they are all gone...
Almost all of the World War II soldiers are now gone.
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Old 09-20-2015, 05:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livingandmoving View Post
That is because the maximum life expectancy is approximately 120 years. 1900 was almost 116 years ago.
If my paternal grandfather were still alive (I think I remember that he was born in 1892), he would be 123 now. He died in the mid 1980s.

If my maternal great grandfather were still alive (I calculated that he was born in 1873), he would be 142 now. He died in 1962 (if I recall correctly).

I knew and interacted enough with both of them personally and have varied photographs of myself with each of them.
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Old 09-20-2015, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Northern Appalachia
5,167 posts, read 6,355,195 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rugrats2001 View Post
Wow. Just wow.

I'm in my 50's, and I can remember when Veterans Day parades had LOTS of World War I soldiers marching in them. Now they are all gone...
I'm 60 and can remember both WWI vets and Spanish-American War veteran marching in Veterans Day and Memorial Day parades back in the 1960s. A Spanish-American War vet who was 18 during the war would have been 85 in 1965, so it was not that remarkable.

I bought a house in 1988 and soon after woke up one Saturday morning to hear a sound coming from my next door neighbor. He was cutting his grass with a manual reel mower. I later found out he had been a pilot in France during WWI. He was in his early 90s and still driving.

I was once told a story that seems difficult to believe. In 1967 I was in 6th grade and going door to door to raise money for a school field trip to Gettysburg. I knocked on the door of a house and a very old lady came to the door. She told me she had two brothers who died at the battle of Gettysburg. I think she donated a quarter for our trip. She was very hard of hearing so I never found out her age. My calculations say her brothers would have had to have been at least 30 years older than her. I guess it was possible. I later delivered her newspaper and mowed her grass. She paid me a dollar to mow her grass.
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Old 09-20-2015, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
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A long time ago, much earlier in my ministry, I had a lovely congregant who had been born in 1878 … Some of the church ladies were at a Tupperware party in which the latest burp*seal containers were being passed around and Great Grandma joked, "I need a coffin … " … She was a real HOOT ...
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Old 09-20-2015, 10:20 PM
 
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Great Grandmother died at 100 in 1994, I was 25 when she died. I remember when she told me about the first time she saw an airplane when she was a girl and didn't know what it was because they were country folks. She said she thought it was judgment day and she jumped in a ditch and began to pray.....thought it was a giant Iron bird breathing fire!
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Old 09-20-2015, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Japan
10,727 posts, read 4,424,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmac1 View Post
Great Grandmother died at 100 in 1994, I was 25 when she died. I remember when she told me about the first time she saw an airplane when she was a girl and didn't know what it was because they were country folks. She said she thought it was judgment day and she jumped in a ditch and began to pray.....thought it was a giant Iron bird breathing fire!
Ha ha, good story. I wonder if your great grandmother was a Beverly Hilbillies fan.

Granny sees a helicopter at 7:00.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBmYkXVteaU
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Old 09-20-2015, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,520 posts, read 7,461,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
I'm 60 and can remember both WWI vets and Spanish-American War veteran marching in Veterans Day and Memorial Day parades back in the 1960s. A Spanish-American War vet who was 18 during the war would have been 85 in 1965, so it was not that remarkable.

I bought a house in 1988 and soon after woke up one Saturday morning to hear a sound coming from my next door neighbor. He was cutting his grass with a manual reel mower. I later found out he had been a pilot in France during WWI. He was in his early 90s and still driving.

I was once told a story that seems difficult to believe. In 1967 I was in 6th grade and going door to door to raise money for a school field trip to Gettysburg. I knocked on the door of a house and a very old lady came to the door. She told me she had two brothers who died at the battle of Gettysburg. I think she donated a quarter for our trip. She was very hard of hearing so I never found out her age. My calculations say her brothers would have had to have been at least 30 years older than her. I guess it was possible. I later delivered her newspaper and mowed her grass. She paid me a dollar to mow her grass.

I remember when I was a child in the 70s I saw some very old Spanish American war vets marching in a Memorial day parade. They obviously were well into their 90s. If I remember there were just a couple of them and they were being pushed in wheelchairs. I also had a great grandmother born in the 1880s and she passed in the early 1980s. She lived quite a life and saw so much happen. It was pretty common in the 1980s and before to come into contact with some very old members of the nineteenth century. If you were willing to listen to their stories you got a first hand account of a world that is only in history books now. Today it is the World War two generation that is disappearing at a rapid rate, although a very few of them will be around for another ten years or so. It was just a few years ago that the last WW1 veteran passed on.
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Old 09-21-2015, 01:38 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
23,411 posts, read 28,257,722 times
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Many of us who are researching our family histories regret that we never sat down with our elders and asked them to tell us about their lives and the family members they remembered. If you have not done so, I highly recommend doing it while you can. Make videos. The genealogists in your family will treasure them.

My father was a sailor on an LST during the Normandy invasion. He never spoke much about WWII until he discovered the LST Association and attended a reunion. I went with him and my mother to a later reunion during which we got to tour the LST 325, which was in Mobile at the time.

LST Memorial 325
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Old 09-21-2015, 01:57 AM
 
9,254 posts, read 10,909,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Many of us who are researching our family histories regret that we never sat down with our elders and asked them to tell us about their lives and the family members they remembered. If you have not done so, I highly recommend doing it while you can. Make videos. The genealogists in your family will treasure them.

My father was a sailor on an LST during the Normandy invasion. He never spoke much about WWII until he discovered the LST Association and attended a reunion. I went with him and my mother to a later reunion during which we got to tour the LST 325, which was in Mobile at the time.

LST Memorial 325
Yes, people should do this! I don't have the vet stories in my family, dad was just a smidge too young for WWII and I lost him when I was 18, before I was interested in hearing about the old days. My mother was a depression baby, and also wrote as an adult. She told me stories dating back as far as the 1930s, and I also have some of her writings.
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Old 09-21-2015, 02:39 AM
 
634 posts, read 489,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UsAll View Post
And I believe I recall it being conveyed in the media and on the web in the past few years or less that biological/life scientists reasonably surmise or predict that life expectancy can prospectively be increased to have some people (or more than some) live to previously unaccomplished ages (perhaps 150 to 180 or 200 or more years?) . . . with advances in medical science. That is, at least in the "foreseeable" future. As to the more distant future (re: centuries ahead), who knows what could be possible?
Yet, so far as can be established through documentation, only one human being has ever lived as long as 120 years, and that was a Frenchwoman who died about thirty years ago. The oldest person on earth has consistently been about 115 years old ever since reliable records have been kept. Average life expectancy has been increasing because more people live out their full life spans. It can be easily seen in the case of lower animals such as pets that no amount of care is going to make them live beyond a certain point, and the same is true with humans.
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