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Old 05-17-2016, 03:43 PM
 
3,211 posts, read 2,828,451 times
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I suspect Smokey the Bear might have been given a second chance even in this day and age. The Living Desert Zoo in Carlsbad, NM often takes in orphaned and other animals. They had a big black bear there for several years named El Patron. I believe he was kept there because he was becoming too intimate with the human lifestyle. After he died, they brought in an orphaned bear cub named Maggie. They keep the bears well fed to minimize the threat to humans.

This bison was more of a potential threat because of disease. Bears, particularly black bears are relatively docile and do seem to accept some training. Not so sure about bison. They appear to be more aggressive.
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Old 05-17-2016, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
6,335 posts, read 3,509,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2mares View Post
Why dont you copy and past the relevant parts concerning brucellosis outbreaks and quarantine of bison in yellowstone. I assume you read all of it?
Yes, I read all of it. Did you? Animals coming from a known infected herd (like the herd in Yellowstone) still need to be quarantined.

Quote:
What exactly is my sources agenda and what is incorrect information.
Your agenda's source is right there below its name:" Working in the field every day to stop the slaughter of Yellowstone's wild free roaming buffalo." And so they attempt to downplay the significance of the fact that the bison herd in Yellowstone (as well as the elk herd) are a known reservoir of Brucella abortans, a bacterium that causes a very serious chronic disease we've largely managed to eradicate from domestic herds. Even their own fact sheet admits that up to 20% of the Yellowstone bison may be infected with Brucellosis.

Now, I don't wish to see the Yellowstone animals wiped out because they are disease carriers (especially since it's the fault of humans that they became infected with Brucellosis in the first place). And the Yellowstone bison are genetically valuable, as they're one of the few "pure" herds without introduced cattle genes left in the US. But requiring them to undergo a long quarantine period and repeated testing for Brucellosis (both serologic and cultures) if they're going to be removed from the park and added or exposed to a domestic herd makes sense.
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Old 05-17-2016, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
19,306 posts, read 20,199,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
Yes, I read all of it. Did you? Animals coming from a known infected herd (like the herd in Yellowstone) still need to be quarantined.

Your agenda's source is right there below its name:" Working in the field every day to stop the slaughter of Yellowstone's wild free roaming buffalo." And so they attempt to downplay the significance of the fact that the bison herd in Yellowstone (as well as the elk herd) are a known reservoir of Brucella abortans, a bacterium that causes a very serious chronic disease we've largely managed to eradicate from domestic herds. Even their own fact sheet admits that up to 20% of the Yellowstone bison may be infected with Brucellosis.

Now, I don't wish to see the Yellowstone animals wiped out because they are disease carriers (especially since it's the fault of humans that they became infected with Brucellosis in the first place). And the Yellowstone bison are genetically valuable, as they're one of the few "pure" herds without introduced cattle genes left in the US. But requiring them to undergo a long quarantine period and repeated testing for Brucellosis (both serologic and cultures) if they're going to be removed from the park and added or exposed to a domestic herd makes sense.
Check your facts:

Brucellosis in Wild Bison Fact Sheet
Pl

'Yellowstone bison are vaccinating themselves for brucellosis, developing an immune response, and clearing the bacteria. There has never been a documented case of brucellosis transmission between buffalo and domestic cattle under natural conditions. In Grand Teton National Park, where vaccinated cattle and brucellosis exposed buffalo have been commingling for decades, no transmission has ever occurred. The chances of transmission between wild buffalo and vaccinated domestic cattle have been characterized as “very low”.'

Last edited by Yeledaf; 05-17-2016 at 06:13 PM..
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Old 05-17-2016, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
6,335 posts, read 3,509,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeledaf View Post
Check your facts:

Brucellosis in Wild Bison Fact Sheet
Pl

'Yellowstone bison are vaccinating themselves for brucellosis, developing an immune response, and clearing the bacteria. There has never been a documented case of brucellosis transmission between buffalo and domestic cattle under natural conditions. In Grand Teton National Park, where vaccinated cattle and brucellosis exposed buffalo have been commingling for decades, no transmission has ever occurred. The chances of transmission between wild buffalo and vaccinated domestic cattle have been characterized as “very low”.'
I did - the infection rate I quoted comes directly from that very fact sheet. "Very low" is not zero, and there are serious financial consequences if a herd of domestic cattle becomes infected with Brucellosis. That's the reason for the quarentine requirements.
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Old 05-17-2016, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
19,306 posts, read 20,199,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
I did - the infection rate I quoted comes directly from that very fact sheet. "Very low" is not zero, and there are serious financial consequences if a herd of domestic cattle becomes infected with Brucellosis. That's the reason for the quarentine requirements.
I understand your point: the financial enrichment of cattlemen trumps all other considerations. All I can do is requote the passage. I'll bold it this time:


There has never been a documented case of brucellosis transmission between buffalo and domestic cattle under natural conditions. In Grand Teton National Park, where vaccinated cattle and brucellosis exposed buffalo have been commingling for decades, no transmission has ever occurred.
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Old 05-17-2016, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
6,335 posts, read 3,509,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeledaf View Post
I understand your point: the financial enrichment of cattlemen trumps all other considerations. All I can do is requote the passage. I'll bold it this time:


There has never been a documented case of brucellosis transmission between buffalo and domestic cattle under natural conditions. In Grand Teton National Park, where vaccinated cattle and brucellosis exposed buffalo have been commingling for decades, no transmission has ever occurred.
Recite the passage all you like, it changes nothing.

Until the USDA changes the quarantine regulations, any animal from a Brcellosis-positive herd (which includes the Yellowstone bison and elk herds) has to undergo a lengthy quarantine (which you can find in the APHIS document I posted earlier) before it can be transported anywhere except directly to a slaughterhouse. The National Park Service is not free to ignore that law. So what would you have them do? Transporting the bison calf to a location outside the park was NOT an option.

Last edited by Aredhel; 05-17-2016 at 09:13 PM..
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Old 05-17-2016, 09:06 PM
 
17,649 posts, read 12,279,078 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
Require the passage all you like, it changes nothing.

Until the USDA changes the quarantine regulations, any animal from a Brcellosis-positive herd (which includes the Yellowstone bison and elk herds) has to undergo a lengthy quarantine (which you can find in the APHIS document I posted earlier) before it can be transported anywhere except directly to a slaughterhouse. The National Park Service is not free to ignore that law. So what would you have them do? Transporting the bison calf to a location outside the park was NOT an option.

This is pretty simple and clear. Others must have emotional objections instead of logical ones here
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Old 05-17-2016, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
8,870 posts, read 10,347,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LLCNYC View Post
You are so heartless! Some animal lover could have adopted it, named it "Bissy", cuddled & bottle fed it all while keeping it in a warm bed made of fluffy feathers.....................


until it became 1400 lbs.
Or the tourists who "rescued" it could have kept it and taken it home, right?
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Old 05-17-2016, 09:58 PM
 
1,168 posts, read 680,677 times
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The typical ending of this story is "Bison shiskabobs tourists"
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Old 05-17-2016, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
19,306 posts, read 20,199,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
Recite the passage all you like, it changes nothing.

Until the USDA changes the quarantine regulations, any animal from a Brcellosis-positive herd (which includes the Yellowstone bison and elk herds) has to undergo a lengthy quarantine (which you can find in the APHIS document I posted earlier) before it can be transported anywhere except directly to a slaughterhouse. The National Park Service is not free to ignore that law. So what would you have them do? Transporting the bison calf to a location outside the park was NOT an option.
I never said it was. My concern is the lack of genetic diversity and eventual extinction of our national mammal, in the interest of the cattle industry, whose abuses and shady practices are well-known.
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