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Old 05-23-2016, 03:50 PM
 
6,307 posts, read 7,149,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forum_browser View Post
That dress was not made for a skinny person with a tiny cup size. I was a string bean and couldn't have worn that dress without a wardrobe malfunction. The dress was for someone who was curvy and on the larger side.

That dress was perfect for that girl. It was in excellent taste.
Without a doubt.

Someone without the "curves" to fill this out would be SOL.
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Old 05-23-2016, 03:51 PM
 
5,528 posts, read 3,383,018 times
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My 16-year-old daughter is slim but tall (5'9") with long legs. She goes to a private school with a fairly strict dress code. Finding dresses that fit the code is problematic for her, not because of the bust, but because of the length. Dresses and skirts run short these days to begin with. In every other way, daughter may fit into the exact same dress as one of her 5'3" friends, but while the skirt is fine on the shorter girl, it is inches too short on daughter. Frankly, she looks great in a short skirt, there is no "body shaming" involved, but she would not be allowed to attend a school dance in a dress that barely covers her derriere.

Is it "fair" that her friend can grab a dress right off the rack and she can't; well, no, but in the "life is not fair" sense, not the "we need to do something about this!" sense. There is no way that shops can carry sizes to suit every possible body style. The way it works is that the people who are "average-size" luck out in this regard, while those who are unusually busty/long-legged/wide-hipped/whatever may have to have their outfit altered.

In the case under discussion, we don't know what the school's official dress code, if any, was. I definitely agree that the standard need to be clear and uniform. Still, for example, if the rule is "no visible cleavage," that is pretty easy for small-chested girls but more difficult for the curvy ones. Just as it is easy for short girls to find a dress no more than two inches about the knee, but practically impossible for my daughter. That's life. It's too bad if it all translates for some people to "fat shaming," being judgmental, or having a double standard.
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Old 05-23-2016, 03:58 PM
 
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If they have a "no cleavage" rule, that is straightforward. If they have an "us larger girls need to cover up" rule, that is completely different.
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Old 05-23-2016, 04:05 PM
 
1,745 posts, read 2,037,005 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mishigas73 View Post
And apparently "taste" is highly subjective.

Be that as it may though, if you've been alive and breathing for about, gee, the past 7, 8 years or so, you'd realize that "fashion" has moved from having a size zero as the sample size. All of the major designers that I know of have come to accept this reality.

Sure, there are some designers that are holding out to this completely unrealistic ideal, but most have come to understand that, nope, that's not where the money is.

Have at your ideals. "Fashion" in general, has moved from the ideal of size zero. Move with the times, or not. But don't think for a moment that what you think is what "fashion" is these days.
Last time I checked Humpty Dumpty wasn't strutting the catwalk at Fashion Week.
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Old 05-23-2016, 04:09 PM
 
6,307 posts, read 7,149,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastBoundandDownChick View Post
Last time I checked Humpty Dumpty wasn't strutting the catwalk at Fashion Week.
Yup, and the vast majority of good designers got their heads out of their butts years ago, and didn't limit their designs to the "tall and thin".

Care to go further on this?
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Old 05-23-2016, 04:26 PM
 
6,307 posts, read 7,149,986 times
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I have no doubt that what I am about to write will fall on certain deaf ears, but in the interest of full disclosure, here it is.

As I've said previously, I'm a bigger gal. When I graduated from school, and needed to find some professional clothing, my mom (who worked in high-end retail for years) had one simple suggestion for me. Don't go for the cheap stuff. The expensive lines will fit you better.

Sure enough, she was right. A "12" from Armani was different from a "12" from a less expensive designer. Gasp. Sure enough, it fit better. What????

"Fashion Week" means jack. What does matter is what these designers produce in their "ready to wear" lines. And, yes, for the most part, it is quality that is meant to fit well and last for a long time.

Over the past 15 years, since I've graduated from school, I've had the opportunity to make quite a few clothing purchases. What my mom said has proven to be correct. Going with established designers has been a great move for me. Escada and Akris are my personal favorites when it comes to suit jackets. If they are meant only for "tall and thin" gals, I can't see it.

I guess though, if one goes for the intermediary stuff, the "designing for size zero" would apply.

Kinda sad, if you ask me.
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Old 05-23-2016, 04:30 PM
 
17,645 posts, read 12,272,160 times
Reputation: 12883
Well I guess there's this


Quote:
update.

“The teen’s father told WATE 6 that an alteration to her dress broke after this picture was taken, causing the dress to be much more revealing once she was at the prom. The picture in the post shows a piece of lace that was added to make the dress more conservative. The girl’s parents said that the lace broke off, which made the neckline several inches lower and wider than in the picture. That’s when a teacher asked her to wear a jacket.

WATE 6 will not publish the photos of the teen in the dress after the alterations broke, at the request of her parents. Anglim added that the neither the girl nor her parents complained to the school district about the incident.”
http://fox13now.com/2016/04/27/tenne...or-prom-dress/
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Old 05-23-2016, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Renton - Fairwood, Washington
759 posts, read 380,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woxyroxme View Post
Not the most revealing prom dress I have ever seen.
Me neither.

She's a little chunky and not at all what I was expecting when I clicked the link.
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Old 05-23-2016, 04:37 PM
 
1,745 posts, read 2,037,005 times
Reputation: 3678
Quote:
Originally Posted by mishigas73 View Post
Yup, and the vast majority of good designers got their heads out of their butts years ago, and didn't limit their designs to the "tall and thin".

Care to go further on this?
What is your definition of a "good" designer? Someone who mass produces and caters to the Layne Bryant crowd? That's called making money. Not fashion.
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Old 05-23-2016, 04:42 PM
 
6,307 posts, read 7,149,986 times
Reputation: 8048
Quote:
Originally Posted by EastBoundandDownChick View Post
What is your definition of a "good" designer? Someone who mass produces and caters to the Layne Bryant crowd? That's called making money. Not fashion.
Oh, I love that you asked me this.

Let me see:

Badgley Mishka
Armani
Escada
Akris

Ever heard of those?
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