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Old 05-29-2016, 05:57 PM
 
Location: On the road
2,642 posts, read 1,826,196 times
Reputation: 2866

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It's always easy, after the fact, to second guess the people involved in such a thing.
When you're in the middle of a crisis situation, you have to make decisions with only what you know at the very second.

The zookeepers did what they believed necessary at the moment.

The Parents. we can blame the parents. But, anyone who has ever cared for kids that age knows that the little buggers can slip away with in the blink of an eye, and it takes superhuman effort to keep track of them, sometimes.
Yes, the parents, and whatever extended family was there "should have kept better control over the kid." What'dya want them to do? Use a leash? My kid brother was one of those kids. Mom DID use a leash a few times. People looked at here with horror. She said, "You try keeping up with him."

It was unfortunate. The zoo will figure out how they can keep another rugrat from getting through the fence, and life goes on.
The Parents, hopefully, will learn to keep an even tighter rein on their little darling, or one day, he will get in another jam, and not be so lucky.

 
Old 05-29-2016, 05:58 PM
AFP
 
6,058 posts, read 3,622,558 times
Reputation: 5229
Quote:
Originally Posted by shamrock4 View Post
I agree with this and also feel it was sad that the zookeepers had no choice under the circumstances. The child could have been harmed or killed in the blink of an eye, even if the gorilla had no actual intent.

All the screaming idiots watching also didn't help. Anyone who knows animals realizes that screaming and yelling will agitate animals at the very least. The general public should have been quickly removed from the area.

The parents are lucky to have their child back alive and unhurt. I only hope they cannot profit off this incident through a lawsuit. They actually should owe the zoo (which taxpayers support) the compensation for a valued animal.

Removing the pubic including the mother should have been done immediately. Perhaps the gorilla drug the child by the foot as a dominance display because he felt threatened by the crowd of screaming fools.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 06:00 PM
 
7,951 posts, read 3,862,498 times
Reputation: 27233
All of you who think the zoo employees should have used a tranquilizer need to stop getting your knowledge from cartoons.

It's not like they would shoot the gorilla and he would immediately go cross-eyed and fall over.

More accurately, they would shoot him, and the combination of the pain from the shot and the ensuing disorientation would make him more aggressive. It would take a few minutes for the drugs to take effect, and before the employees could get to him, he likely would have done something that would have killed the child.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
8,626 posts, read 16,240,717 times
Reputation: 5932
Quote:
Originally Posted by pennyone View Post
Maybe they were busy breeding more kids and forgot about the ones they already have.
My guess is cell phone, texting and selfies.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 07:06 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 3,754,809 times
Reputation: 6149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zen88 View Post
I'm at a loss for words when I see people feeling more for a gorilla than for a human being. Yes, it's sad that the animal had to be killed, and I'm sure it's caretakers are very upset (as I certainly would be), but it would be much, much more tragic if the child died. The takeaway is how to prevent this in future.
Amen to that. Humans>animals, any other opinion is a bunch of fruity nonsense.

As for the parents, as long as they instructed their child to stay close and made reasonable efforts to see to that, I don't think they did anything wrong. The 3 year old did, especially if the parents had told him to stay out of the area. In that scenario, HE goofed up by not obeying his parents' orders. He can't be held accountable for it but it's his fault. Yes it's common for small children to be curious and want to explore, but once they've been told NO then the response is supposed to be absolute obedience no matter how they feel about it. Period.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY
30,377 posts, read 9,081,069 times
Reputation: 28915
Quote:
Originally Posted by branDcalf View Post
I wasn't there so I can't judge for myself. But having several kids and our house was the gathering place, I know children can get themselves into the darnedest predicaments in little more than the blink of an eye.

Since gorillas (and many types of chimpanzee) can rip other animals apart with their bare hands and/or teeth, the gorilla's death was likely necessary.

Yes, kids do the darndest things, so why bother keeping both eyes and at least one hand on your three- or four year old while at the zoo.

1. The child isn't responsible.
2. The parent(s) should've watched the child.
3. The gorilla acted like a gorilla.
4. Get rid of zoos.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 07:31 PM
AFP
 
6,058 posts, read 3,622,558 times
Reputation: 5229
Quote:
Originally Posted by shyguylh View Post
Amen to that. Humans>animals, any other opinion is a bunch of fruity nonsense.

As for the parents, as long as they instructed their child to stay close and made reasonable efforts to see to that, I don't think they did anything wrong. The 3 year old did, especially if the parents had told him to stay out of the area. In that scenario, HE goofed up by not obeying his parents' orders. He can't be held accountable for it but it's his fault. Yes it's common for small children to be curious and want to explore, but once they've been told NO then the response is supposed to be absolute obedience no matter how they feel about it. Period.
At 3 years old the parents are 100% responsible for making him obey and keeping him safe. A three year old bears no responsibility, he is the product of his upbringing.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 08:11 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
9,480 posts, read 13,334,142 times
Reputation: 19899
Quote:
Originally Posted by shyguylh View Post
Amen to that. Humans>animals, any other opinion is a bunch of fruity nonsense.

As for the parents, as long as they instructed their child to stay close and made reasonable efforts to see to that, I don't think they did anything wrong. The 3 year old did, especially if the parents had told him to stay out of the area.
OMG, please!
So parents are totally faultless if they instruct their kids to behave, thus relieving them of the responsibility of actually watching out for their welfare... say around a busy road? A rushing river, a bonfire, the balcony on a high rise? Because we all know kids always do what their parents tell them, especially the little ones!
 
Old 05-29-2016, 08:16 PM
 
Location: The Jar
20,071 posts, read 13,744,602 times
Reputation: 36712
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delahanty View Post
Yes, kids do the darndest things, so why bother keeping both eyes and at least one hand on your three- or four year old while at the zoo.

1. The child isn't responsible.
2. The parent(s) should've watched the child.
3. The gorilla acted like a gorilla.
4. Get rid of zoos.
Great post!
 
Old 05-29-2016, 08:42 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,566 posts, read 21,741,355 times
Reputation: 44312
Quote:
Originally Posted by texas7 View Post
My guess is cell phone, texting and selfies.
I second your guess.
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