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Old 06-04-2016, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
19,618 posts, read 13,224,327 times
Reputation: 14303

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Quote:
Originally Posted by catdad7x View Post
I have a hard time classifying anything that requires irritating/pissing off an animal for human entertainment a sport, but that's just my opinion. It's sad this person died as result of his 'sport', but a small part of me doesn't feel all that sorry for him.
The animals aren't angry. The bucking stock are all doing what they do reflexively, a natural reaction that comes from the wild; when a predator leaps on the back of a prey animal, the prey bucks. Domestic horses and cattle (although cattle aren't commonly ridden) all buck when first ridden unless they have been de-sensitized from infancy by touching them very frequently.

The bucking stock are just like the humans in a rodeo. Both know what's coming, and both become charged full of adrenalin, and both perform from learned experience.

Even so, there are lots of bulls and horses that don't buck and all, or buck very weakly when the gate opens. Those animals are sold off quickly, as both the animal and rider are counted in points to determine the winner. The less the animal bucks, the lower the points, so the rider gets shut out of a pay day.

That's why, on the top level of the sport, only the fiercest bucking stock and only the best riders compete. Since bulls are ridden, testosterone can take them over and cause them to go after a cowboy once thrown. But a bull that comes out of the gate with the intention of trying to kill a rider is rare. Once the bucking reflex starts, it always takes a while for it to wind down and stop, but most bulls begin looking for the open gate to the corral once a rider is thrown.

Relatively few stallions are used for bucking stock, as stallions are quick to fight each other in close quarters and bulls are not. Most bucking horses are geldings, and they too start looking for the gate as soon as their job is done.

Sundown, one of the most famous bucking horses ever, was never rode, but famous for being very relaxed before the bucking chute was opened, and then would explode with every trick in a horse's arsenal of self-defense. Then as soon as he threw his rider, he would stand calmly in the arena, waiting to be let out. Sometimes he would go over and check the rider he just threw. Sundown bucked riders off when he was in his late 20s, and lived well into his 30s, very old age for a horse.

Violent? Sure. So is MMA, stock car racing, football, basketball, pro wrestling, boxing, and other sports. Some I mentioned have expected violence as their main attraction, but in others, its the action that attracts audiences. That's true with rodeo.

Like horse racing, folks love to watch the animal and the human perform, but they don't come expecting to see injury or death as a primary attraction. Folks don't go to car races to watch drivers die, either, or football players. Or weight lifters. But injury and/or death occur in them all.
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Old 06-05-2016, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,054 posts, read 22,650,428 times
Reputation: 33307
Quote:
Violent? Sure. So is MMA, stock car racing, football, basketball, pro wrestling, boxing, and other sports. Some I mentioned have expected violence as their main attraction, but in others, its the action that attracts audiences. That's true with rodeo.
But in each of your examples here, it's all humans choosing to participate. No one asks the horses or bulls if they want to join in. They don't get a choice.
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Old 06-05-2016, 11:30 PM
 
13,220 posts, read 5,520,263 times
Reputation: 8163
I didn't realize they had rodeos in New Jersey. Sorry for the family of the guy who got killed, and especially sorry for his parents who witnessed it.
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Old 06-08-2016, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 6,991,460 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Your sympathy for the rodeo stock is misplaced. No animal on the planet is better treated than bucking stock. Those animals are super stars. They have their own sports statistics and their own physical therapists. They have their own fan clubs. They get the very best food and the very best medical care.

It's a days work for them... err, 8 seconds of work for them, probably no more than once a week. Most of them know their job well enough to stop bucking and head for the exit as soon as the buzzer blows.

If a horse kills the rider it is most likely an accident. Horses don't like stepping on people. Some of the bulls will go after people while their adrenaline is up, but then they are placid and easy to handle once they are not performing.

People like dangerous sports. Rodeo is no more dangerous than dozens of other soorts, including favorites like football.
^^^
Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
The animals aren't angry. The bucking stock are all doing what they do reflexively, a natural reaction that comes from the wild; when a predator leaps on the back of a prey animal, the prey bucks. Domestic horses and cattle (although cattle aren't commonly ridden) all buck when first ridden unless they have been de-sensitized from infancy by touching them very frequently.

The bucking stock are just like the humans in a rodeo. Both know what's coming, and both become charged full of adrenalin, and both perform from learned experience.

Even so, there are lots of bulls and horses that don't buck and all, or buck very weakly when the gate opens. Those animals are sold off quickly, as both the animal and rider are counted in points to determine the winner. The less the animal bucks, the lower the points, so the rider gets shut out of a pay day.

That's why, on the top level of the sport, only the fiercest bucking stock and only the best riders compete. Since bulls are ridden, testosterone can take them over and cause them to go after a cowboy once thrown. But a bull that comes out of the gate with the intention of trying to kill a rider is rare. Once the bucking reflex starts, it always takes a while for it to wind down and stop, but most bulls begin looking for the open gate to the corral once a rider is thrown.

Relatively few stallions are used for bucking stock, as stallions are quick to fight each other in close quarters and bulls are not. Most bucking horses are geldings, and they too start looking for the gate as soon as their job is done.

Sundown, one of the most famous bucking horses ever, was never rode, but famous for being very relaxed before the bucking chute was opened, and then would explode with every trick in a horse's arsenal of self-defense. Then as soon as he threw his rider, he would stand calmly in the arena, waiting to be let out. Sometimes he would go over and check the rider he just threw. Sundown bucked riders off when he was in his late 20s, and lived well into his 30s, very old age for a horse.

Violent? Sure. So is MMA, stock car racing, football, basketball, pro wrestling, boxing, and other sports. Some I mentioned have expected violence as their main attraction, but in others, its the action that attracts audiences. That's true with rodeo.

Like horse racing, folks love to watch the animal and the human perform, but they don't come expecting to see injury or death as a primary attraction. Folks don't go to car races to watch drivers die, either, or football players. Or weight lifters. But injury and/or death occur in them all.
^^^
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
But in each of your examples here, it's all humans choosing to participate. No one asks the horses or bulls if they want to join in. They don't get a choice.
If these horses weren't bucking stock in rodeos, they'd be pet food because they won't let people ride them. The ones that "wash out" -- aren't good enough -- get shipped out to Mexico or Canada for slaughter like thousands of other unwanted horses. The bulls who aren't good enough eventually end up in slaughter pens as well, only in the US, just like millions of head of other cattle.
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Old 06-10-2016, 12:17 AM
 
Location: the Permian Basin
4,112 posts, read 2,864,566 times
Reputation: 5699
It's real obvious that some people in this thread couldn't tell a bucking chute from a roping chute if their life depended on it.

As to the original post, my sympathies go to the friends and family of the cowboy who passed. Unfortunately, wrecks are part of rodeo, particularly in rough stock events.
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Old 06-10-2016, 08:47 AM
 
17,497 posts, read 10,231,898 times
Reputation: 6744
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Freddy View Post
A rodeo where nobody gets bucked off and stepped on is like a stock car race with no crashes.
All along I thought it was about the tight jeans.


This is sad and I usually put things like this in the category, it was his time to exit the planet. I am sorry the parents had to see this, this would have been horrific.
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Old 06-10-2016, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,054 posts, read 22,650,428 times
Reputation: 33307
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
^^^

^^^


If these horses weren't bucking stock in rodeos, they'd be pet food because they won't let people ride them. The ones that "wash out" -- aren't good enough -- get shipped out to Mexico or Canada for slaughter like thousands of other unwanted horses. The bulls who aren't good enough eventually end up in slaughter pens as well, only in the US, just like millions of head of other cattle.
What happens to these horses when their bucking days are over? How many years are they used for this purpose? It seems to me that putting them in rodeos just prolongs the inevitable just a little bit longer for them.
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Old 06-10-2016, 10:05 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
12,989 posts, read 6,563,022 times
Reputation: 4608
Hats in hand, N.J. rodeo remembers young rider killed during opening night | NJ.com
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Old 06-10-2016, 05:15 PM
 
26,163 posts, read 14,616,783 times
Reputation: 17235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowhound
Horse tosses rodeo performer off back, tramples him to death
Thats sad but thats what happens when you abuse horses!! (They do not like to be ridden really)
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Old 06-10-2016, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Dallas
5,480 posts, read 4,635,261 times
Reputation: 15644
Quote:
Originally Posted by 11thHour View Post
Rodeos should be banned, imo.
I agree. Rodeos are inhumane, and IMO should be banned. Some facts that lovers of this sport may not know:

Rodeo Facts: The Case Against Rodeos | Animal Legal Defense Fund
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