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Old 06-10-2016, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,307 posts, read 2,884,660 times
Reputation: 6768

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Klassyhk View Post
I get Fitness magazines and read a lot about diet and fitness so most of what I've read on this thread, I'm familiar with. However, your post is news to me and EYE-OPENING. I only buy wheat or whole grain bread and have done so for years. I'm not obese nor overweight but what you've shared concerns me because I've noticed that I tend to have sinus problems all year round, bloating as well. I'm wondering if wheat isn't the cause or a contributor. What alternatives did the book suggest, or have you found, to replace wheat?
Well, I'd suggest that you read up on the subject first to get a sense of what these authors say and to see what you think about what they say. Try reading Wheat Belly or a comparable title. I think Davis presents a pretty sound argument, and maybe you will, too.

Wheat might not be a cause of your sinus problems and bloating. But one way to determine if it could be a contributor is, as Davis says, to limit your consumption of it (or avoid it entirely) for a few weeks. Then, see how you feel. Slowly re-introduce it to your diet. See how you feel.

Davis suggests, among other things, substituting different flours for wheat flour. I've found that some alternatives are easy to incorporate, such as almond flour (almond meal); others maybe not so much. If nothing else, I think I've learned to be far less dependent on wheat as a go-to source of food, and to think more readily of other options.

 
Old 06-10-2016, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,307 posts, read 2,884,660 times
Reputation: 6768
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klassyhk View Post
It doesn't take a lot of money to buy fresh fruit vegetables whether at a supermarket or Walmart especially during warmer months. I've found even prices very similar to these at local farmer's markets. Yes, the prices are more in places like Alaska (I've lived there before), HI, CA, and NYC but if you were to go to smaller cities outside of those areas, you'll find fruit and vegetables very affordable which is why I don't buy this poor people can't afford to eat healthy or it's expensive for all socioeconomic levels to eat healthy. i say that's bull.

Approximate vegetable food prices:
1 lb bag of carrots .69+ cents
Pint of mushrooms $1.50
Squash .99 lb
Fresh spinach $1.99 bunch
Head of Lettuce $1.99
Cabbage .30 lb
Cucumbers 3 for $1
Tomatoes 2.99 for a pkg or less for loose tomatoes
Potatoes 5 lb bag for $2.99 - 3.99
Onion 2 lb bag $1
celery $1.69 a bunch

The packaged foods in the frozen aisles cost much more than these prices and a large bag of Potato Chips is $3.99-4.99 or more. Canned goods may be cheaper when on sale but that is not eating healthy. Most of the foods that I've noticed in people's basket are junk and cost more (sodas, sweeten cereals, cookies, hot pockets, frozen waffles/pancakes, etc.) than what I've listed for fresh fruit and vegetables.

The "gourmet" healthy foods (seasoned salmon fillets, sweet-potato chips in which the potatoes were harvested by poor women in India, pastoral European cheese for $10 for a small block, $6 bag of eight cookies made with molasses from Vermont, etc) and "organic" foods are expensive and you're basically paying for the elite feeling of getting food by way of Asia, India, or supposedly grown by a vegan farmer with flawless skin in New England or Oregon. Organic cranberry juice is $7 for a 32 ounce bottle. Organic tart cherry juice even more, rinse, repeat.

I won't name the expensive grocers who supposedly sell healthy food but we know who they are plus the ones local to your area. If you shop there you're paying for the "experience" of shopping there and the feeling of being elite. The organic labeling is often a charade which has been documented by studies and research. If your wallet can't handle the expensive healthy food stores then go to a regular grocer or Walmart and shop for healthy food. It is very affordable. Don't forget farmer's markets which provide fresh food which taste much better than what you'll find in stores.



Or you can subscribe to a local CSA (community-supported agriculture) to get locally grown, fresh produce. Unless you're growing the fruit and vegetables yourself, you can't get much more fresh than that.
 
Old 06-11-2016, 12:05 AM
 
Location: In a little house on the prairie - literally
10,202 posts, read 5,728,234 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by newdixiegirl View Post


Or you can subscribe to a local CSA (community-supported agriculture) to get locally grown, fresh produce. Unless you're growing the fruit and vegetables yourself, you can't get much more fresh than that.
Most farmer's markets I go to the produce is more expensive than at Aldi's. By far. I keep trying, wanting to support local, but will not pay the huge premium demanded.
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