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Old 06-16-2016, 02:04 PM
 
11,981 posts, read 9,778,590 times
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I don't think the "no swimming" signs are attempts to downplay alligators. Floridian and other Southern freshwater lakes are breeding grounds for bacteria and brain eating amoebas. A little boy died in the 80s from an amoeba after being at one of Disney's former water parks on Bay Lake, River Country. And that water had gone through a filter system. So clearly the water itself poses risks, not unlike many other Southern freshwater lakes. At least one person dies each year after contracting a deadly amoeba from a lake in the (usually Southern) US, not to mention other waterborne infections. Yet the sign does not say "warning: brain eating amoebas" (though some will probably think it should).

Additionally, the water is not the cleanest (anymore). It looks kind of gross, to be frank. Some have claimed there are oil slicks on top of it. It's probably been polluted. Also, they have no lifeguards on duty at the beach, since they clearly don't want you swimming, so they need to put up signs telling you not to swim so you don't drown. So it's probably a general "no swimming" sign for a variety of reasons. I don't think it's a thinly veiled attempt to hide an alligator problem. They don't want you swimming - period. Perhaps they should change the signs to "do not enter the water or come within three feet of the shoreline."
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Old 06-16-2016, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Deep 13
1,007 posts, read 729,127 times
Reputation: 2949
Quote:
Originally Posted by dman72 View Post
they are going to put up fences to keep people away from the water now, without doubt. They will not take any chances.
I would think that an underwater fence off shore from the beach would be the logical choice. Something that's about 4-6 underwater and has a 'motion-detector' on it. Anything that bumps into the fence would trigger one alarm, any pressure on the fence from something crawling over it would set off another alarm.

This would at least keep the beach views the same.
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Old 06-16-2016, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Groveland, FL
1,271 posts, read 2,040,674 times
Reputation: 1759
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
The lifeguard was at a pool...not on the beach.
That explains it, thanks!
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Old 06-16-2016, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles County
11,157 posts, read 9,199,165 times
Reputation: 29341
I saw some signs posted in various news articles and one of them said "No swimming, steep drop off" so I'm not sure Disney was using this as a generic cover for no swimming - alligators. Everything will change now though because of one incident in 50 years. Some of the signs did just saying no swimming though, so who knows.
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Old 06-16-2016, 02:16 PM
 
6,164 posts, read 3,397,737 times
Reputation: 13103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobdreamz View Post
I just wonder what part of this sign that is posted around the beaches of Disney World do people not understand?


http://www.safetysign.com/images/cat...arge/F7720.png

The Darwin Award goes too...
swim

[swim] /swɪm/
Spell Syllables
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
verb (used without object), swam, swum, swimming. 1. to move in water by movements of the limbs, fins, tail, etc.

2. to float on the surface of water or some other liquid.

3. to move, rest, or be suspended in air as if swimming in water.

4. to move, glide, or go smoothly over a surface.


There has been no indication that the victim was doing any of these things.
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Old 06-16-2016, 02:21 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
73,593 posts, read 65,291,354 times
Reputation: 69904
Quote:
Originally Posted by reed067 View Post
This is true. Odds are they are watching the Kardashians.


Why watch something intelligent?
Not everyone's preference for "something intelligent" is Animal Planet. There are a couple of channels that have cool science shows, archaeology, etc. There are news talk shows and things like Bill Moyers. There's a variety of "intelligent" programming out there.
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Old 06-16-2016, 02:25 PM
 
13,490 posts, read 9,742,860 times
Reputation: 17460
Quote:
Originally Posted by yspobo View Post
In Disney's promo ad for the beach area, Disney shows people wading into the water on their beach. This greatly infers to the public that it is safe to wade into the water.
The lawyer will have a FIELD DAY with that photo.
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Old 06-16-2016, 02:27 PM
 
4,263 posts, read 3,072,427 times
Reputation: 7037
Quote:
Originally Posted by dman72 View Post
First of all, I don't think Disney knowingly did this. They were ignorant. The last alligator attack on Disney property was decades ago.
There is no way that Disney was ignorant about alligators in its artificial lake. Just because these tragedies happen rarely does not make them impossible. A corporation the size of Disney has lots of in-house counsel whose job it is to be informed about all liabilities and the potentiality for law suits. If there's even an inkling of a hazard to the public, it is these lawyers' job to notify the parent company.

Disneyworld has been around since 1971. So they know the area well. Resorts consult with and hire all sorts of wildlife experts in planning and maintaining their parks in order to minimize danger to their patrons. Obviously Disney was informed about the high population of alligators in the area and their entry into the artificial lakes. Other resorts in the area know about the dangers of alligators and post warning around bodies of water on their properties. If the smaller resorts in Orlando do this, do you really think the biggest one of them all would be unaware of this?

“There isn’t a waterway in Florida that doesn’t have an alligator in it,” said Kenneth Krysko, herpetology collections manager at the Florida Museum of Natural History and an expert on the state’s alligators and crocodiles.

Did Disney do enough to warn its guests about alligators? | On Air Videos | Fox News

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.6648ad1ad5f4


Quote:
Originally Posted by dman72 View Post
The last thing Disney wants is toddlers being killed on their property, trust me, and they will do everything in their power now to make sure it doesn't happen again. They can afford to pay this family off more money then they've would have ever seen in their lifetime, and probably will. That won't bring their son back and that is tragic and I'm sure that poor family will never be the same.
^^ Agreed.
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Old 06-16-2016, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Type 0.7 Kardashev
10,577 posts, read 6,920,727 times
Reputation: 37369
Quote:
Originally Posted by NLVgal View Post
The lawyer will have a FIELD DAY with that photo.
Yes, but not in court. This case will never get to trial, assuming one is filed (they may even make sure it doesn't go that far). Disney will deal with it as quietly and quickly as possible, no matter how much it costs.
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Old 06-16-2016, 02:33 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
73,593 posts, read 65,291,354 times
Reputation: 69904
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobdreamz View Post
I just wonder what part of this sign that is posted around the beaches of Disney World do people not understand?


http://www.safetysign.com/images/cat...arge/F7720.png

The Darwin Award goes too...
The child wasn't swimming. The child isn't old enough to swim. He was sitting in the water. The sign doesn't say "no wading", or "keep out of the water". It very graphically says "no swimming". That's undoubtedly part of the problem. The other part of the problem is that the parents didn't want to leave the kid at home with a sitter, so they dragged him everywhere they went on vacation, including to night-time entertainment. As if a 2-year-old could enjoy a movie, or whatever the program was.
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