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Old 06-01-2017, 04:42 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
7,994 posts, read 3,944,881 times
Reputation: 4762

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The State of Ohio filed a lawsuit on Wednesday against the pharmaceutical industry over the opioid epidemic, accusing several drug companies of conducting marketing campaigns that misled doctors and patients about the danger of addiction and overdose.

The drugs were once used primarily for acute, or short-term pain, but over the last two decades, doctors have increasingly prescribed them to treat chronic pain, giving them to patients for months or years at a stretch. Drug makers promoted that change, Mr. DeWine charged in his suit, spending “millions of dollars on promotional activities and materials that falsely deny or trivialize the risks of opioids while overstating the benefits of using them for chronic pain.”
Ohio Sues Drug Makers, Saying They Aided Opioid Epidemic


Wouldn't it make more sense to sue the true culprits~ the dope pushing doctors? And how about suing all those Big Pharma dope pushers who bring the free samples into our doctor's offices getting into the doctors before all the patients with appointments waiting in the waiting room?
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Old 06-01-2017, 04:52 AM
 
4,766 posts, read 1,879,033 times
Reputation: 4823
The city of Everett in Was state is suing also. I think it's a good thing. There's been too much abuse of the stuff and the profit driven industry needs to be put in it's place.
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Old 06-01-2017, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles County
11,085 posts, read 9,019,566 times
Reputation: 29061
This should be in the good news thread.

We are one of the very few (I think 2 left) countries that allows advertising of drugs. I'm amazed with as PC as our country is that we still allow this.
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Old 06-01-2017, 07:42 AM
bg7
 
7,698 posts, read 7,645,830 times
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The downside is, as has happened before, because of all the losers, people who end up in genuine need of temporary pain relief will ultimately find it harder to get there.
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Old 06-01-2017, 07:44 AM
 
2,953 posts, read 1,395,524 times
Reputation: 5292
I agree. Oh the stories I could tell from my RX working friends. I even have a friend who quit her job, she said she felt like a drug dealer and went to Yoga school. Now she can sleep at night.
No wonder our drug prices are so high.
Evil greedy industry.

Why should a national account manager be making millions a year. (including his stock options) $600,000 + in salary.
He didn't invent this stuff now does he own the patent. If they are indebted to the stock holders, they shouldn't be paying this kind of money.
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Old 06-01-2017, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Phoenix AZ
5,920 posts, read 10,459,834 times
Reputation: 9227
Quote:
Originally Posted by i_love_autumn View Post
The State of Ohio filed a lawsuit on Wednesday against the pharmaceutical industry over the opioid epidemic, accusing several drug companies of conducting marketing campaigns that misled doctors and patients about the danger of addiction and overdose.

The drugs were once used primarily for acute, or short-term pain, but over the last two decades, doctors have increasingly prescribed them to treat chronic pain, giving them to patients for months or years at a stretch. Drug makers promoted that change, Mr. DeWine charged in his suit, spending “millions of dollars on promotional activities and materials that falsely deny or trivialize the risks of opioids while overstating the benefits of using them for chronic pain.”
Ohio Sues Drug Makers, Saying They Aided Opioid Epidemic


Wouldn't it make more sense to sue the true culprits~ the dope pushing doctors? And how about suing all those Big Pharma dope pushers who bring the free samples into our doctor's offices getting into the doctors before all the patients with appointments waiting in the waiting room?
Sounds like bull crap to me. Opioids are the only thing that works for many patients- they're actually cheap & extremely effective & "addiction" can be managed pretty easily in a healthcare setting. Expensive & opioid aren't words that go together - the only expensive opioids are the ones designed to be harder to misuse. Addicts get around that & patients in pain don't need that "feature".

The only thing worse than "addicts" is intentionally having untrained government agents /with an axe to grind/ between patients & doctors counting pills & deciding for themselves how much is "enough".

For patients in extreme intractable pain, there is effectively /no/ limit to how much morphine you can (or should) give as long as they're still breathing. If I'm in pain, I want stuff that works, and I want *enough* of it. I don't want some pencil-neck-government-agent counting my doses & inserting his *not medically trained* opinion into my decision to /not/ suffer.

Funny that the people leading the charge against effective pain management are the same ones that would deny you the right to end your own suffering, take away a woman's right to choose whether or not to get (or stay pregnant), and then harp for hours about "big government". Spend an hour in a burn unit then tell me how we need to restrict the use of opioids.
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Old 06-01-2017, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Georgia
3,516 posts, read 1,213,052 times
Reputation: 2646
I don't doubt that these drug companies are more concerned with making money than helping people. However, they are NOT responsible for addiction- addicts are. People are warned about the addictive nature of these type of drugs, and they are also well aware when they are taking more than is prescribed. Once addicted, there are two choices- practice your addiction- the easy choice. Or, get help, and get clean- the hard choice. Practicing addicts generally want what's easiest. By the way, I'm a recovering addict. I am responsible for my addictions, and for my recovery.
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Old 06-01-2017, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Concord NC
1,686 posts, read 921,782 times
Reputation: 4618
What ever happened to personal responsibility?
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Old 06-01-2017, 11:52 AM
 
5,660 posts, read 3,204,284 times
Reputation: 6637
Quote:
Originally Posted by i_love_autumn View Post
The State of Ohio filed a lawsuit on Wednesday against the pharmaceutical industry over the opioid epidemic, accusing several drug companies of conducting marketing campaigns that misled doctors and patients about the danger of addiction and overdose.

The drugs were once used primarily for acute, or short-term pain, but over the last two decades, doctors have increasingly prescribed them to treat chronic pain, giving them to patients for months or years at a stretch. Drug makers promoted that change, Mr. DeWine charged in his suit, spending “millions of dollars on promotional activities and materials that falsely deny or trivialize the risks of opioids while overstating the benefits of using them for chronic pain.”
Ohio Sues Drug Makers, Saying They Aided Opioid Epidemic


Wouldn't it make more sense to sue the true culprits~ the dope pushing doctors? And how about suing all those Big Pharma dope pushers who bring the free samples into our doctor's offices getting into the doctors before all the patients with appointments waiting in the waiting room?
Oh, I definitely agree with your last paragraph because I have seen it. How long should a patient be taking Oxycotin after back surgery or hip replacement? 10 days? 2 weeks? 2 months? 2 years? Elderly people are getting addicted after these surgeries, and the doctors are enabling this because they cannot see a person "in pain", or check to see that maybe something went WRONG with the surgery?

My husband's former boss got addicted after back surgery. When the original doctor, after months, refused to give him any more scripts, he found another willing doctor. He lost his job, and ended up on the streets getting his drugs from dealers. He is in his 50's.

My husband had hip replacement surgery. 10 days of Oxycotin. Doctor asked if he was still in pain. Here is another 10 day script. He would nod out all the time. Driving to work? DANGEROUS. Repeating the history of his former boss? I told him bluntly that he was becoming an addict, just like his boss. That was enough to scare him. After only approximately 2 WEEKS on it, he went through withdrawal; sweats, shaking, vomiting. Instead of asking for MORE medication, he switched doctors. He was in pain because his hip replacement FAILED, and had to be replaced. The other doctor looked for the CAUSE of the pain, not masking the symptoms of the pain. When he was given medication for the 2nd surgery, he told the new doctor, "Do not give me any of that Oxycotin crap". My husband was in his 60's during this.

Yes, even Dentists push pain pills. I have had numerous dental surgeries going back to my childhood. I know what my pain level is with them. Few years go I needed two teeth and a cyst removed, which I've had once before. Dentist gave me some pain script. I told him I didn't need it. Take it you WILL need it. I left without it. His Receptionist followed me to my car with the script in hand. Doctor SAYS you will NEED this. I told her too that I didn't need it or want it. She started ARGUING with me in the parking lot. You want to talk about PUSHING Pain Pills when the Patients doesn't even want them????? Please don't attempt to tell me doctors themselves don't push pain meds. After years of experience I know a couple of Tylenol works fine with me.

It has changed over decades. When I was in the hospital 30 years ago for surgery for a ruptured ectopic pregnancy and massive internal bleeding, I was only given narcotics for the first 24 hours after surgery. After that it was only Tylenol in the hospital, and definitely no Pain Meds when I went home. Today that would have warranted narcotics for weeks.

A crackdown on this is definitely in order.
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Old 06-01-2017, 01:37 PM
 
9,298 posts, read 5,797,074 times
Reputation: 7556
Quote:
Originally Posted by i_love_autumn View Post
The State of Ohio filed a lawsuit on Wednesday against the pharmaceutical industry over the opioid epidemic, accusing several drug companies of conducting marketing campaigns that misled doctors and patients about the danger of addiction and overdose.

The drugs were once used primarily for acute, or short-term pain, but over the last two decades, doctors have increasingly prescribed them to treat chronic pain, giving them to patients for months or years at a stretch. Drug makers promoted that change, Mr. DeWine charged in his suit, spending “millions of dollars on promotional activities and materials that falsely deny or trivialize the risks of opioids while overstating the benefits of using them for chronic pain.”
Ohio Sues Drug Makers, Saying They Aided Opioid Epidemic


Wouldn't it make more sense to sue the true culprits~ the dope pushing doctors? And how about suing all those Big Pharma dope pushers who bring the free samples into our doctor's offices getting into the doctors before all the patients with appointments waiting in the waiting room?
How about a little more personal responsibility on the part of patients and their physicians. In some parts of the country, it's already difficult for patients with short term pain to get prescribed medication. On the western slope of Colorado, after a friend gave birth, she got one pain pill and she had to beg for it. They told her their community had too many addicts, so they didn't hand them out. I think the state of Ohio may be barking up the wrong tree, a marketing campaign wouldn't sway an intelligent physician's actions.
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