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Old 11-01-2017, 10:50 AM
 
23,873 posts, read 17,571,986 times
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makes sense..

Quote:
Autism genes may have been conserved during human evolution because they make us smarter, say scientists.
More inherited genetic variants linked to autism have been naturally selected than would be expected by chance, a study has shown.
https://geneticliteracyproject.org/2...ke-us-smarter/
Quote:
Previous genetic studies demonstrated that ASD positively correlates with childhood intelligence, college completion, and years of schooling. Accordingly, we hypothesize that certain ASD risk alleles were under positive selection during human evolution due to their involvement in neurogenesis and cognitive ability.
Widespread signatures of positive selection in common risk alleles associated to autism spectrum disorder
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Old 11-02-2017, 07:42 AM
 
Location: NJ
502 posts, read 676,929 times
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I think over the next two or three generations, we will observe a reversion to mean in these genes. My theory is the "intelligence" genes accumulate in a sub population for generations, helping the carriers in their daily lives (being "smarter" than average) until the genes mutate into full diagnosed autism. Then it becomes a hindrance (esp. in social ability needed to form/raise a family) so the mutated genes will decrease.

Some argue that better diagnosis has led to explosion in autism rates, but as a mother of an ASD, I genuinely observe more kids affected than when I was growing up. It has nothing to do with screen time or breastmilk or w/e. the latest fad is. It might be the accumulation of genes or environmental factors causing more mutations or stress in mothers during pregnancy, who knows, but a lot of these poor children are born neurologically atypical now.
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Old 11-02-2017, 02:08 PM
 
Location: North Texas
23,599 posts, read 31,135,299 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsPiggleWiggle View Post
I think over the next two or three generations, we will observe a reversion to mean in these genes. My theory is the "intelligence" genes accumulate in a sub population for generations, helping the carriers in their daily lives (being "smarter" than average) until the genes mutate into full diagnosed autism. Then it becomes a hindrance (esp. in social ability needed to form/raise a family) so the mutated genes will decrease.

Some argue that better diagnosis has led to explosion in autism rates, but as a mother of an ASD, I genuinely observe more kids affected than when I was growing up. It has nothing to do with screen time or breastmilk or w/e. the latest fad is. It might be the accumulation of genes or environmental factors causing more mutations or stress in mothers during pregnancy, who knows, but a lot of these poor children are born neurologically atypical now.
I'm neurologically "diverse" (I don't like the term "atypical") and you'd think with all the awareness of neurodiversity, people would be more understanding with people like me.


Sadly not.


Full disclosure: I do not have nor will I ever have my own genetic children. Not my choice.
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Old 11-02-2017, 02:17 PM
 
48,884 posts, read 39,370,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsPiggleWiggle View Post
I think over the next two or three generations, we will observe a reversion to mean in these genes. My theory is the "intelligence" genes accumulate in a sub population for generations, helping the carriers in their daily lives (being "smarter" than average) until the genes mutate into full diagnosed autism. Then it becomes a hindrance (esp. in social ability needed to form/raise a family) so the mutated genes will decrease.

Some argue that better diagnosis has led to explosion in autism rates, but as a mother of an ASD, I genuinely observe more kids affected than when I was growing up. It has nothing to do with screen time or breastmilk or w/e. the latest fad is. It might be the accumulation of genes or environmental factors causing more mutations or stress in mothers during pregnancy, who knows, but a lot of these poor children are born neurologically atypical now.
Autism heavily correlates with age of the parents at birth.

With the average birth age in the US climbing and climbing over the years I suspect that is the main driver along with more diagnosis of it.
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Old 11-02-2017, 02:19 PM
 
15,847 posts, read 8,428,912 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsPiggleWiggle View Post
I think over the next two or three generations, we will observe a reversion to mean in these genes. My theory is the "intelligence" genes accumulate in a sub population for generations, helping the carriers in their daily lives (being "smarter" than average) until the genes mutate into full diagnosed autism. Then it becomes a hindrance (esp. in social ability needed to form/raise a family) so the mutated genes will decrease.

Some argue that better diagnosis has led to explosion in autism rates, but as a mother of an ASD, I genuinely observe more kids affected than when I was growing up. It has nothing to do with screen time or breastmilk or w/e. the latest fad is. It might be the accumulation of genes or environmental factors causing more mutations or stress in mothers during pregnancy, who knows, but a lot of these poor children are born neurologically atypical now.
Interesting.

IQ genes are on the X chromosome making mothers most important. High IQ mothers have less kids and later in life. Low IQ women the most. This is a recent trend in human history. Perhaps high IQ women feel kids will stunt their career.
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Old 11-02-2017, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Texas
42,203 posts, read 49,740,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michiganmoon View Post
Interesting.

IQ genes are on the X chromosome making mothers most important. High IQ mothers have less kids and later in life. Low IQ women the most. This is a recent trend in human history. Perhaps high IQ women feel kids will stunt their career.
High IQ women have more choices in general.
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Old 11-02-2017, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Independent Republic of Ballard
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Correlation does not equal causation.
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Old 11-02-2017, 08:08 PM
 
15,847 posts, read 8,428,912 times
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Originally Posted by CrazyDonkey View Post
Correlation does not equal causation.
That is true that correlation does not necessarily equal causation.

However...

Scientifically speaking, IQ is largely genetically inherited from many different genes, period. Yes, other factors play a role as well, by genetics is the biggest for adults in study after study. Genetics largely controls the physical structure of the brain - shape, size, connections, etc of the brain. The different structures are scientifically shown to impact IQ, memory, etc...

Scientifically speaking, a person needs certain genes to have autism, period. Autistic people have a different structure in a variety of ways. Different structures makes an impact on brain performance.


The population that has autism scores higher on non-verbal IQ tests than those who don't have it. Of course with plenty of exceptions.

What is interesting is that those with some of the autism genes but who didn't acquire autism itself - also score higher on IQ tests than those who no autism genes.

This is replicated in different countries.
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Old 11-03-2017, 07:09 AM
 
Location: NJ
502 posts, read 676,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
Autism heavily correlates with age of the parents at birth.

With the average birth age in the US climbing and climbing over the years I suspect that is the main driver along with more diagnosis of it.
I hear this a lot (along with IVF leading to higher rates, not sure if proven though because anecdotally I have not yet met an IVF child with developmental issues), but I want to see recent statistics breaking down autism diagnosis by different variables. It's so hard to find reputable data and studies these days...

NJ has a autism registry when your child is diagnosed, but the info they collect is very sparse (basically DOB of child, gender, and county if I remember. So that's not really useful. Our clinician told me that among the children she has evaluated, the maternal age was not a clear variable. Furthermore, when I take my son for his therapies, the mothers in the waiting room seem mostly in their early to mid 30's, which is a lot younger than the mom age distribution I see in my local parks.

Also keep in mind there are many types of autism--not all have increased raw intelligence. When I view the family members of some lower functioning kids, I don't think this study applies whatsoever. Where's the research on that, because those are the most unfortunate kids who end up needing the most public resources as they grow up.
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Old 11-03-2017, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
18,975 posts, read 10,032,914 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsPiggleWiggle View Post
I hear this a lot (along with IVF leading to higher rates, not sure if proven though because anecdotally I have not yet met an IVF child with developmental issues), but I want to see recent statistics breaking down autism diagnosis by different variables. It's so hard to find reputable data and studies these days...

NJ has a autism registry when your child is diagnosed, but the info they collect is very sparse (basically DOB of child, gender, and county if I remember. So that's not really useful. Our clinician told me that among the children she has evaluated, the maternal age was not a clear variable. Furthermore, when I take my son for his therapies, the mothers in the waiting room seem mostly in their early to mid 30's, which is a lot younger than the mom age distribution I see in my local parks.

Also keep in mind there are many types of autism--not all have increased raw intelligence. When I view the family members of some lower functioning kids, I don't think this study applies whatsoever. Where's the research on that, because those are the most unfortunate kids who end up needing the most public resources as they grow up.
I know many families who used IVF to conceive and have kids with developmental issues. I don't have stats in front of me but I know I've seen them to suggest that.

But your final paragraph was the point I was going to make. For every Sheldon Cooper, there is a non-verbal person with autism who will never live independently, never mind finish college.
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