U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-19-2018, 07:03 AM
 
48,881 posts, read 39,370,650 times
Reputation: 30545

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
On the other hand, you aren't necessarily comparing like to like in different years because of differences in field composition. There was talk going in about how the women's elite field skewed more 'American' and how the US women had a better shot at a win than usual because so many internationals were targeting London or Rotterdam as their 2018 spring marathon instead. Course the buzz was on other athletes like Jordan Hasay (late DNS because of injury) Molly Huddle, and Shalane Flannigan to break the drought rather than Desi, but that's why you run the race.
If you're going to make that comment you should provide support for why the MENS field which is the one I looked at was weaker\stronger than prior....and not just anecdotally but perhaps show how top 15 AFricans from the last 2 years did this year?

If they didn't even run then you'd possibly be on to something. If they did and went from top 15 to 15- 30 then it would weaken the field weakening theory.

To REALLY do this correctly would take a full analysis of runners times throughout races this year and the deviation to their boston run correlated by other variables like what their normal deviation to Boston is from other key races etc. etc. but none of us is going to take all that time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-19-2018, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Central IL
13,341 posts, read 7,115,490 times
Reputation: 31024
Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
I'm sure you're aware that "African" is a location-specifier as well as a racial description.
Yes - which points to (at least) TWO different explanations for their success - climate and ethnicity. It could be these things independently of each other, in combination, or other things we're not even aware of.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2018, 08:11 AM
 
12,627 posts, read 12,065,272 times
Reputation: 17267
Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
Yes - which points to (at least) TWO different explanations for their success - climate and ethnicity. It could be these things independently of each other, in combination, or other things we're not even aware of.
Or it could be the big sport to do, thus a large pool of people and pipelines for training are in place and easily accessible, sort of like how Norway dominates in the Winter Olympics.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2018, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,007 posts, read 5,287,613 times
Reputation: 9647
Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
Is it racist to point out that large swaths of Africa are typically warm, dry places? And is it racist to posit that people who come from those places are not accustomed to cold, wet weather? And is it further racist to suggest that the conditions that might be particularly adverse for a large number of African runners might explain why they didn't perform as well as they otherwise might have?
It is not racist to refer to the general climatic nature of Africa. It is racist to make statements or post opinions based on the race or continent of origin of a person without any knowledge of them as individuals. The OP posits that someone from Africa cannot tolerate a COLD, DAMP,RAINY day in Boston because their ancestors were recently in Africa. They may, for all any of us here know, be residents of London.
It appears, anyway, anthropologically, we are all from Africa.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2018, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
4,928 posts, read 3,129,832 times
Reputation: 14819
This is the chain of comments in which I was involved:


Quote:
Originally Posted by miu View Post
The weather was really miserable in Boston today. Very chilly, windy and the rain was very heavy. At least it wasn't snow. Everyone said that it was the worst Boston Marathon weather ever. Hypothermia was a big concern for this race event. And at the end of the race, the runners were made to strip ALL of their wet clothing off, then wrapped in a Mylar blanket before they could walk to the buses that held their dry street clothing.

The unusually cold conditions was why the usual African winners didn't win today.

The bolded part engendered the following response:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
That is the most racist thing I have heard in 30 years. And look where I live. Sheesh.

To which I responded:

Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
Is it racist to point out that large swaths of Africa are typically warm, dry places? And is it racist to posit that people who come from those places are not accustomed to cold, wet weather? And is it further racist to suggest that the conditions that might be particularly adverse for a large number of African runners might explain why they didn't perform as well as they otherwise might have?

And then you answered:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
It is not racist to refer to the general climatic nature of Africa. It is racist to make statements or post opinions based on the race or continent of origin of a person without any knowledge of them as individuals. The OP posits that someone from Africa cannot tolerate a COLD, DAMP,RAINY day in Boston because their ancestors were recently in Africa. They may, for all any of us here know, be residents of London.
It appears, anyway, anthropologically, we are all from Africa.

Call me blind, but I see no racism in the first post. It seems to be common knowledge that runners from Africa tend to dominate marathons, and the first poster was suggesting a reason why they may not have done so this time. To me, it stands to reason that runners who are used to warm, dry weather would be less prepared for chilly, wet weather; and that this could affect their running abilities.

Where is the racism?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2018, 01:15 PM
 
Location: A place that's too cold
4,077 posts, read 4,046,849 times
Reputation: 10052
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
It is not racist to refer to the general climatic nature of Africa. It is racist to make statements or post opinions based on the race or continent of origin of a person without any knowledge of them as individuals. The OP posits that someone from Africa cannot tolerate a COLD, DAMP,RAINY day in Boston because their ancestors were recently in Africa. They may, for all any of us here know, be residents of London.
It appears, anyway, anthropologically, we are all from Africa.
Not because their ANCESTORS were from Africa, but rather, the runners themselves.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2018, 02:43 PM
 
2,215 posts, read 753,524 times
Reputation: 3734
Quote:
Originally Posted by coschristi View Post
I ran in 81, 82, 83, 90, 91 & 2004! My now 88 year old uncle has ran it every year ... It is very inspirational; especially finishing in Folsom Field, sort of makes you feel like a star for a minute.

Although I am way slow; definitely not Elite status. I don’t even care about beating my own best time; my goal is always to finish & have fun along the way.

I noticed that very few of those Elite athletes compete in the Pikes Peak Marathon, which goes from 6,000ft elevation to 14,115ft. In fact, the top 10 are almost always from Colorado (2015 first place was from Japan).

There are a few more who only run the ascent (you can register for just ascent or the full marathon), I wonder if that is out of concern for injury? My dad & sister have both done the PP but I’m afraid I’m not marathon material.

I do know that altitude conditioning is one reason the Olympic Training Center is here.

I think it’s strange that the narrative formerly known as: “Celebrate Diversity” has now changed to: “Deny it.”

Or that to acknowledge racial characteristics is now characteristically racist & we are going to have to revise all the science textbooks & get rid of all those offensive references to Adaptation, Natural Selection & Evolution.

It’s a good thing we don’t have to depend on ourselves to “Live off the land” anymore ... I can just see some enlightened yet bewildered rancher; wondering why his one-humped dromedary camel isn’t herding the sheep. Or an Inuit in Alaska whose Chihuahua dog sled team is performing underwhelmingly.
Hi there . That's terrific, you probably passed me when we both ran in 83, lol. I'm slow too, and am happy to just finish. My best time out of the 3x I ran it was 56min for the 10k (6.2miles). I think the last time I started in the Y group way towards the end. I didn't know my pace per mile so I guessed. It was exciting passing some of the folks who misjudged their pace per mile, and passing the walkers too . I practiced on hills so the final hill into Folsom field wasn't as bad as it could have been. And the hill at Casey jr high too. I think 83 had the light, misty rain which I liked. I miss Boulder, but couldn't afford it if I cried my eyes out. I did live there for 8yrs back then.

Yes, the PP marathon, and ascent are very cool. In general I think many of the people who do that are trail runners, and have to train much differently than road runners. A number of years ago I went to Manitou to hang out not knowing they were having that race. It was the time that gentleman passed away during the race. They also had to cancel the race because of a crazy storm that was coming in. I had hiked up a bit on the Barr trail but the race volunteers turned me around because the thundering herd was coming down, and I was in the way. There was a torrential downpour, and I took shelter at the Iron Springs. I think there was snow up higher, but can't remember for sure. I might be getting my stories mixed up. That has been known to happen lol. At any rate, that mountain is so massive it creates it's own weather system . A fair share of athletes live in Manitou to be close to all those trails, lucky them.

If I lived there I could train on the Barr trail with you, at least a little bit. I would be thrilled to be able to hike the whole darn thing to the top eventually. I've wanted to live in Manitou Springs for ages, but can't afford that either, sigh . Living on SS alone kind of bites the big one. I loved exploring all the cool little neighborhoods up there, and enjoying the mineral springs. You can get a great workout just doing that since the streets are so steep. Way back when, I used to live in Colorado Springs, and take the bus to Manitou, and walk all over for the day. Or get off early, and explore Red Rock Canyon across hwy 24 from Garden of the gods. It's like a baby Garden of the gods, but less busy.

I've done the incline 2 1/2 times woohoo! I used to have photos of it in my profile that I took before taking them all down. I'd love to be able to do that more often, although I feel like dying for a couple weeks after. I have fibro/cfs so in order to do anything I have to work myself up into a frenzy just to get out of the apartment. I already have 24/7 body wide pain for 21yrs, and any kind of exercise just adds to it. Being 70 doesn't help much either. I envy your uncle. He's on a roll .

I was able to mostly walk two 10k's, and one 12k in 2017 up in the Olympic Peninsula when I lived there. I'm in E. Oregon now, and in kind of a relapse which always happens with too much stress of any kind, and I've had a bucket load. But last night I made myself go for a walk a block, run a block for 40 min to try to start running again. All the Boston talk got me somewhat motivated. That felt pretty awful. I think 40 min was too much to begin with. 30 min would be better. Sorry for writing so much.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2018, 02:53 PM
 
4,618 posts, read 10,494,859 times
Reputation: 10291
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Growing up in Chula Vista is warm sunny climate....so I wouldn't think this weather condition was ideal for her. All I can think about are their joint damage in time.

The LA Marathon goes down my street to the finish line and I can't watch it anymore...and pain I see on these people..people falling down and laying in the street, that's one thing I didn't get into, but pushed my body enough and pay today.
Seeing as marathon runners as a group are MUCH LESS LIKELY to have joint problems and the rate of joint replacement is MUCH LESS in marathon runners you really don't need to think about "their joint damage"....since there isn't any going on...



...marathon running is actually protective for your knees. There's been a few long-term studies. Meaning they followed runners who run marathons and run marathons on a regular basis, and then they come back to them 20-30 years later.

It actually decreases all-cause mortality, meaning these people are living longer. They have fewer diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes. But it's actually protective for their knees. They have fewer instances of osteoarthritis. Which is when the bones wear away.
What running a marathon does to your knees and other health benefits - Business Insider
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2018, 02:54 PM
 
2,215 posts, read 753,524 times
Reputation: 3734
Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
Yes - which points to (at least) TWO different explanations for their success - climate and ethnicity. It could be these things independently of each other, in combination, or other things we're not even aware of.
Don't forget to include methods of training, and diet which have an effect also. Years ago I read an article on the Kenyans diet which was interesting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2018, 03:03 PM
 
2,215 posts, read 753,524 times
Reputation: 3734
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
Or it could be the big sport to do, thus a large pool of people and pipelines for training are in place and easily accessible, sort of like how Norway dominates in the Winter Olympics.
Yes, that goes back to that movie on the Ethiopians I mentioned earlier. They had running schools that drew in scads of young runners. I'll have to look for that. It was a very neat movie from a runners perspective. More of a documentary.

As an aside, I've wondered for a long time why more American blacks don't get into long distance racing instead of mostly sprinting. They would probably be pretty good at it. All they really need are shoes. Work off some stress.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top