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Old 04-26-2018, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
2,183 posts, read 800,407 times
Reputation: 4348

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
Much better article but still misses the mark for good reporting.

It sounds like the family doesn't understand the rules and the details.

Exactly. This whole thing says a great deal more about the despicable and deplorable state of American journalism and news reporting, than about airlines.
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Old 04-26-2018, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Santa Monica, Ca
5,748 posts, read 3,185,977 times
Reputation: 13507
When i worked for the airlines as a ticket/gate/ dispatch agent we had specially designed " stair chairs" that were narrow enough to navigate the isles on the aircraft in order to assist disabled passengers on and off the plane. They had straps that crossed over the chest so that the passenger didn't fall. Kind of like a dolly with a seat. They sat, were strapped in and asked to keep their arms crossed over their chest to keep from bumping the seats on either side of them while being moved. I can't see Delta "strapping" a passenger into a wheelchair unless it for their safety while either boarding or exiting the the A/C.
Imagine the outrage had the disabled passsenger NOT been strapped in and was injured.
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Old 04-27-2018, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
772 posts, read 1,014,419 times
Reputation: 912
The photo won't load for me but I can tell a lot is being left out of the article.

First of all and small point...but this is Atlanta. Nine times out of ten, Delta employees do not handle wheelchair assistance in the airport or onto the plane. Delta pays a contract company to assist passengers in wheelchairs within the airport and onto/off of the plane. The only time a Delta employee would get involved is if they could not find an employee from the contract company. That happens more in smaller airports but rarely happens in Atlanta.

Second, and most important. This wasn't her wheelchair as the article says. Why would they do that when personal wheelchairs (especially for someone with MS) would have arms. If they were assisting her on the airplane than she was moved from her personal wheelchair to an aisle chair. The aisle chair is purposely slim in order to fit down the aisles of an aircraft. Some have straps and some don't. The passenger is pushed to their row, and moved into their seat (either by their own strength or lifted by the employees). The whole process takes less than five minutes.

Finally, if the chair did not have straps than they had to improvise if she was falling out of the chair. I seriously doubt the blanket was dirty (more likely it was pulled off the plane for this purpose or was in a closet at the gate) and never would someone just start wrapping her up with the blanket. They probably said to her that the chair didn't have straps but they could try using a blanket. If she or her family didn't like that idea than they should have spoken up and waited until a chair with straps could be located.

International flights board approximately 45 minutes before departure and they board passengers needing assistance first (if they are in the gate area in time). My point, they could have said no to the blanket idea and insisted the contract employee go find an aisle chair with straps and she could board at the end of the boarding process.
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Old 04-27-2018, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
772 posts, read 1,014,419 times
Reputation: 912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Retroit View Post
How would these people evacuate from a burning aircraft if necessary?

Flight attendants have a list of all passengers who have told the airline they have a disability. The flight attendant would either help them or assign another passenger to help them.
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Old 04-27-2018, 08:18 AM
 
Location: 39 20' 59"N / 75 30' 53"W
15,710 posts, read 22,767,205 times
Reputation: 17461
How does a go-fund-me account fit in here?
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Old 04-27-2018, 01:07 PM
 
1,104 posts, read 774,995 times
Reputation: 2166
Here’s where the story lost credibility for me.

It took place in Amsterdam, and supposedly the airport contracted employee told her to ‘shut the eff up’. Dutch people speak pretty good English, but I have a hard time imagining the average Dutch airport employee using slang like this. If they were irate, they’d curse in their own language.
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Old 04-27-2018, 01:10 PM
 
1,104 posts, read 774,995 times
Reputation: 2166
Quote:
Originally Posted by fly_widget View Post
The photo won't load for me but I can tell a lot is being left out of the article.

First of all and small point...but this is Atlanta. Nine times out of ten, Delta employees do not handle wheelchair assistance in the airport or onto the plane. Delta pays a contract company to assist passengers in wheelchairs within the airport and onto/off of the plane. The only time a Delta employee would get involved is if they could not find an employee from the contract company. That happens more in smaller airports but rarely happens in Atlanta.

Second, and most important. This wasn't her wheelchair as the article says. Why would they do that when personal wheelchairs (especially for someone with MS) would have arms. If they were assisting her on the airplane than she was moved from her personal wheelchair to an aisle chair. The aisle chair is purposely slim in order to fit down the aisles of an aircraft. Some have straps and some don't. The passenger is pushed to their row, and moved into their seat (either by their own strength or lifted by the employees). The whole process takes less than five minutes.

Finally, if the chair did not have straps than they had to improvise if she was falling out of the chair. I seriously doubt the blanket was dirty (more likely it was pulled off the plane for this purpose or was in a closet at the gate) and never would someone just start wrapping her up with the blanket. They probably said to her that the chair didn't have straps but they could try using a blanket. If she or her family didn't like that idea than they should have spoken up and waited until a chair with straps could be located.

International flights board approximately 45 minutes before departure and they board passengers needing assistance first (if they are in the gate area in time). My point, they could have said no to the blanket idea and insisted the contract employee go find an aisle chair with straps and she could board at the end of the boarding process.
It was in Amsterdam, they were transferring to another flight.
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Old 04-27-2018, 05:41 PM
 
48,898 posts, read 39,401,698 times
Reputation: 30554
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottgekko View Post
Delta Staff Tied Passenger With Multiple Sclerosis to Her Wheelchair, Family Claims

I'm not even sure where to start with this one....There has to be something additional here...Delta is disputing the customer's story....

Couple of immediate observations:

- Instead of helping his mother, he must stop and take pictures.
- They requested a wheelchair with straps - it wasn't there. OK. Would you like no wheel chair or see what we can do in the mean time? Did the family members attempt to assist or just watch all of this play out?
- If you need a very specific medical device, don't you bring it with you? You can gate check wheelchairs, strollers, etc. How was she to get around after leaving the airport?
- I would hope that Delta employees at the gate, who's job is customer service, would not treat someone like this. Seems a little over the top, even for airline employees....
The key word in the title is "family claims".

But newsweek is circling the drain so sensationalist stories to keep them in print in the internet era is where they've landed.

I'd caution that most print media at this point is in deep. Same goes for cable networks like CNN, ESPN etc.

Technology has screwed them over and more and more people are turning to the internet instead of print of cable.

As such, they're pandering for niche viewers\readers more and more to stay afloat.

We are currently in the worst media quality trough since the yellow journalism of 100 years ago. It's ugly to watch and clearly non-partisan.

Last edited by toosie; 04-28-2018 at 07:23 AM.. Reason: Profanity deleted
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Old 04-27-2018, 06:56 PM
 
2,512 posts, read 1,285,890 times
Reputation: 6680
The author of the AJC article has an English degree from Harvard and a journalism degree from Northwestern. She’s no slouch.
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Old 04-28-2018, 07:51 AM
 
2,512 posts, read 1,285,890 times
Reputation: 6680
The other thing that bugs me about this story is that, if the blanket was too tight, enough to cause bruising, why didn't she say "it's too tight" (or have her husband tell them) when it was put on her? If she were put into the wheelchair with straps, the straps could have been adjusted too tightly as well. The person putting it on for someone else has no idea if something is too tight or not.

And, the fact that a photo was taken. So husband, son or whoever is going to let her sit and cry so they can take a photo of this alleged issue, instead of taking off the blanket which is supposedly causing her pain?

I mean what, was it like "Sorry ma, gotta snap this photo for 'evidence' before we get this blanket off of you." It just seemed too staged.

It wasn't the most elegant solution, but really what was the harm of using a blanket as a strap when there was nothing available? She was intending to be strapped in, so it's not like she was restrained against her will. And it's not like she was expected to be wheeled all over Europe like this. It was a temporary solution to get her through the airport terminal after a long overseas flight.

My mother could not sit up on her own either. If I had just gotten her off an overnight flight, knowing she was tired, jet lagged, and maybe hungry, I'd want to get her through airport processing as quickly as possible and into whatever vehicle I had hired for transport outside the airport.

And I don't believe the son's account that someone said "shut the eff up" to her.
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