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Old 04-28-2018, 09:03 AM
 
994 posts, read 667,679 times
Reputation: 3541

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
It was the fault of the nursing home. We don't know if this woman even had living family that she was close to. Since she was in her 90s, her own children were probably in their 70s and might have been in nursing homes too, or too frail themselves to provide care for their mom.
I'm not saying that the nursing home wasn't at fault and possibly her kids may not be healthy either but if my grandmother was in a home I will be checking up on her.
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Old 04-28-2018, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,129 posts, read 3,639,022 times
Reputation: 13529
Atrocious!!

THIS LINE IS A KEY to her "caring, loving" family
Quote:
It is not clear when the family last visited Zeni in the home
Yes, it's obviously clear to me...

They dumped her and obviously forgot about her. I blame the family as MUCH as the home and workers.
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Old 04-28-2018, 10:12 AM
 
10,090 posts, read 6,495,844 times
Reputation: 23714
Her family isn't going to get any money for this. First, huge pay outs are not the norm. And this isn't a personal loss issue. Its a licensing and legal issue.

I worked briefly in a nursing home. As a nursing assistant they wanted me to care for up to 30 residents at a time, all with significant health problems. It just wasn't possible to do that *and* be ethical, thorough, and kind. I saw a lot of abuse and reported it, including a nursing assistant slapping a 99 year old woman with severe dementia. But then got passive-aggressively punished by being given even more patients and tasks. I refused to do it. I was young and single so I had the flexibility to quit. But the sad thing was this wasn't a terrible nursing home, over all. Not great and very depressing, but not awful from the outside.

Basically...we aren't devoting enough resources to caring for our aging population. And as the population gets older, if that isn't changed, its going to get worse.
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Old 04-28-2018, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,129 posts, read 3,639,022 times
Reputation: 13529
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
I don't think they will get much if anything at all. My great Aunt was in a nursing home and died after being fed milkshakes when she refused solid food she had diabetes and that was clearly noted on her chart. They didn't call her doctor or check her blood sugar when she went into a coma. Her family talked to two attorneys who said that because of her age the settlement wouldn't even cover attorney fees. It seems they factor in the patients age in these cases and she was close to 100.

https://www.propublica.org/article/p...take-your-case
My sister in law's father had Alzheimer's, was in a nursing home, and almost died from dehydration. They put coffee????(a diuretic!) and water in front of him and because he never touched it, they took it away.

Rinse, repeat how many times?

No one was smart enough to realize that he didn't have a clue how to raise the cup to his mouth and drink it himself until my sister in law happened to drop by and sees the cups sitting there full in front of him. He looked very ill to her and the visit before that he'd looked fine. (maybe a change of staff?)

She immediately went to the nursing station and asked how much fluids he'd been drinking? They didn't have a record of his input/output. The nurse checked him and called the doctor who deemed the case critical, and immediately put him on IV to hydrate the poor old guy.

You pay SO much for a nursing home to care for your loved ones, and the staff can't even make sure of something so basically life sustaining as providing water/fluids!!!! It's disgusting and scary.

I fear for the day I might end up in an overcrowded home full of Baby-boomers.
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Old 04-28-2018, 10:35 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,676 posts, read 64,172,365 times
Reputation: 68458
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
I have some insider knowledge on this so let me explain.

Nursing homes pay and it's not always easy work.

When the economy is really good, it's much much harder to get good employees.

FOR PROFIT nursing homes in particular because they only get a fixed (low) amount of money for the poor residents because the state gives them $X per day instead of $3X per day from the people that have LTC insurance or assets etc.

I've seen claims from these situations 20 years ago and this is NOT NEW.

Heck, I've seen a few cases even worse than this.

Start hiring the dregs because you can't get people to do work for low wages in a good economy and the next thing you know they skip feedings, skip bed changing, abuse patients, steal from patients etc. etc. etc.
Horrific! What's the solution; more/better oversight? Who applies and enforces standards?
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Old 04-28-2018, 10:38 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,676 posts, read 64,172,365 times
Reputation: 68458
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
Her family isn't going to get any money for this. First, huge pay outs are not the norm. And this isn't a personal loss issue. Its a licensing and legal issue.

I worked briefly in a nursing home. As a nursing assistant they wanted me to care for up to 30 residents at a time, all with significant health problems. It just wasn't possible to do that *and* be ethical, thorough, and kind. I saw a lot of abuse and reported it, including a nursing assistant slapping a 99 year old woman with severe dementia. But then got passive-aggressively punished by being given even more patients and tasks. I refused to do it. I was young and single so I had the flexibility to quit. But the sad thing was this wasn't a terrible nursing home, over all. Not great and very depressing, but not awful from the outside.

Basically...we aren't devoting enough resources to caring for our aging population. And as the population gets older, if that isn't changed, its going to get worse.
Do you see a difference between private nursing homes, and ones with a lot of patients paid for by SS? (Are there "public" nursing homes, in that sense?) It sounds from Mathguy's post, that they all have similar staffing issues.
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Old 04-28-2018, 10:51 AM
 
17,229 posts, read 14,821,251 times
Reputation: 32782
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
Her family isn't going to get any money for this. First, huge pay outs are not the norm. And this isn't a personal loss issue. Its a licensing and legal issue.

I worked briefly in a nursing home. As a nursing assistant they wanted me to care for up to 30 residents at a time, all with significant health problems. It just wasn't possible to do that *and* be ethical, thorough, and kind. I saw a lot of abuse and reported it, including a nursing assistant slapping a 99 year old woman with severe dementia. But then got passive-aggressively punished by being given even more patients and tasks. I refused to do it. I was young and single so I had the flexibility to quit. But the sad thing was this wasn't a terrible nursing home, over all. Not great and very depressing, but not awful from the outside.

Basically...we aren't devoting enough resources to caring for our aging population. And as the population gets older, if that isn't changed, its going to get worse.
^^This. I've worked as an OT in nursing homes for almost 20 years, and have always thought if we treated kids like we do the elderly, it would be a front-page national scandal. It is going to get worse, as our budget priorities are going the opposite way at the same time the country is aging.
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Old 04-28-2018, 10:59 AM
 
17,229 posts, read 14,821,251 times
Reputation: 32782
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Do you see a difference between private nursing homes, and ones with a lot of patients paid for by SS? (Are there "public" nursing homes, in that sense?) It sounds from Mathguy's post, that they all have similar staffing issues.
Even private nursing homes take Medicaid patients, and nursing homes with many Medicaid patients still cost $10,000 a month or so. Facilities are generally better in wealthier areas, BUT I have seen plenty of awful care in the most beautiful facilities. In fact I am automatically suspect if the place is gorgeous, because my experience tells me they spend their money on appearances, not care. I have worked in many wealthy places that had poor care because they had poor pay to workers, constant turnover and were always short-staffed.


Never forget that private companies and most especially corporate-owned facilities first priority is to their shareholders, just like any other corporate entity.


The best places I have worked in were religious-affiliated places like United Methodist Homes, Lutheran Home, Jewish facilities, etc. You do NOT have to be of that religion to live there.
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Old 04-28-2018, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Montgomery County, PA
13,642 posts, read 8,664,774 times
Reputation: 11254
Don't get the "eaten alive" part.
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Old 04-28-2018, 11:04 AM
 
48,897 posts, read 39,392,211 times
Reputation: 30554
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
Even private nursing homes take Medicaid patients, and nursing homes with many Medicaid patients still cost $10,000 a month or so. Facilities are generally better in wealthier areas, BUT I have seen plenty of awful care in the most beautiful facilities. In fact I am automatically suspect if the place is gorgeous, because my experience tells me they spend their money on appearances, not care. I have worked in many wealthy places that had poor care because they had poor pay to workers, constant turnover and were always short-staffed.


Never forget that private companies and most especially corporate-owned facilities first priority is to their shareholders, just like any other corporate entity.


The best places I have worked in were religious-affiliated places like United Methodist Homes, Lutheran Home, Jewish facilities, etc. You do NOT have to be of that religion to live there.
Yes. The not-for-profits would generally be better.

As for the lawsuit angle, I probably shouldn't have made an estimate because there are so many variables.

Please keep in mind though that MISTAKES are another animal entirely from abuse and neglect in terms of lawsuit viability.
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