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Old Yesterday, 08:26 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
7,142 posts, read 12,611,312 times
Reputation: 30006

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harpaint View Post
Not so funny for the lady though. UPS may refuse to deliver there now.
Once her knees quit knocking the neighbor dog owner told her about the invisible fence, once he quit laughing. She laughed along with him after that.
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Old Today, 08:14 AM
 
Location: 912 feet above sea level
1,931 posts, read 703,038 times
Reputation: 10688
Does anyone else think that they term 'porch pirate' is an insipid euphemism?

Someone who steals an automobile is not a 'car klepto'.
Someone who steals at Barnes and Noble is not a 'book buccaneer'.

Good Lord, people...
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Old Today, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,567 posts, read 5,584,781 times
Reputation: 10395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hulsker 1856 View Post
Does anyone else think that they term 'porch pirate' is an insipid euphemism?

Someone who steals an automobile is not a 'car klepto'.
Someone who steals at Barnes and Noble is not a 'book buccaneer'.

Good Lord, people...
No, the thievery of packages from porches at a frequency great enough to enter the cultural lexicon is a relatively recent phenomenon brought on by Amazon's increased presence in our lives. I was recently reading an article about an Amazon driver who while in training with a more experienced driver, was taught how to recognize them tailing the vans.

And we do have a term for car thieves...Carjackers.
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Old Today, 08:56 AM
 
2,754 posts, read 515,016 times
Reputation: 1434
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
Final score:

Family Dog = 1
Porch Pirate = Zero!
If the dog was a Mastiff-type dog, especially an English Mastiff, I would feel even more intimidated.
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Old Today, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Deep 13
1,031 posts, read 754,012 times
Reputation: 3021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hulsker 1856 View Post
Does anyone else think that they term 'porch pirate' is an insipid euphemism?

Someone who steals an automobile is not a 'car klepto'.
Someone who steals at Barnes and Noble is not a 'book buccaneer'.

Good Lord, people...
It's just a label that's easy to remember and/or rolls off the tongue. Can't say if the media came up with it or someone on a forum somewhere. 'Snowpocalypse', 'snowmageddon', 'poopalooza', 'Golfcart Gail', 'BBQ Becky' are all terms which roughly describe an event without exacting details.

'Porch', because there isn't a better term to describe the front of a house where the packages are usually left. Pirates were at times opportunistic thieves that would prey upon ships that they came across that seemed as easy pickings, just as seeing a package in an entryway is an unguarded target. They also stalked targets, just as people follow delivery vans around.

Even 'Jack the Ripper' could be considered an insipid euphemism for the time.
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Old Today, 09:31 AM
 
331 posts, read 506,237 times
Reputation: 202
Good boy!
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Old Today, 09:48 AM
 
10,789 posts, read 6,128,635 times
Reputation: 11221
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
No, the thievery of packages from porches at a frequency great enough to enter the cultural lexicon is a relatively recent phenomenon brought on by Amazon's increased presence in our lives. I was recently reading an article about an Amazon driver who while in training with a more experienced driver, was taught how to recognize them tailing the vans.

And we do have a term for car thieves...Carjackers.
"Porch pirate" sounds cutesy. We all think of Johnny Depp in his pirate costume, not Somalians slicing up people at sea.

We could easily call them package thieves which used to be the common term until some decided property crime is no big deal, along recent relaxation of property crime penalties. It is part of our changing society, someday stealing won't even be a crime, we will be told to just share.
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Old Today, 10:22 AM
 
8,001 posts, read 1,999,130 times
Reputation: 5619
Quote:
Originally Posted by tamajane View Post
"Porch pirate" sounds cutesy. We all think of Johnny Depp in his pirate costume, not Somalians slicing up people at sea.

We could easily call them package thieves which used to be the common term until some decided property crime is no big deal, along recent relaxation of property crime penalties. It is part of our changing society, someday stealing won't even be a crime, we will be told to just share.
Im not sure when they started calling them 'porch pirates', I think some small local news station somewhere probably used the term for a story and it stuck. These crimes are nothing new though, people used to steal packages back in the 80s and 90s too.
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Old Today, 12:28 PM
 
13,870 posts, read 12,669,231 times
Reputation: 18783
"Porch pirate" is a perfect term to use.

I think it should be one year in prison mandatory if convicted of doing this.
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Old Today, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,567 posts, read 5,584,781 times
Reputation: 10395
Quote:
Originally Posted by tamajane View Post
"Porch pirate" sounds cutesy. We all think of Johnny Depp in his pirate costume, not Somalians slicing up people at sea.

We could easily call them package thieves which used to be the common term until some decided property crime is no big deal, along recent relaxation of property crime penalties. It is part of our changing society, someday stealing won't even be a crime, we will be told to just share.
Huh? Its called alliteration. Its a literary device. Anyhow, its hardly the first time the term "Pirate" has been used outside of the original definition of maritime piracy. There's Pirate Radio, Musical/Copyright Pirating, etc...The first two refer to the difference between a corsair/privateer and a pirate. One had a royal warrant, literally a license to steal, the other just stole. That reference drew the comparison between someone that had a license to broadcast or to use someone else's music, and someone that just used it without compensating the owner or getting the proper license. The comparisons between a Package thief and a Pirate are just as valid. Its a crime of opportunity, hoping to steal something of value, a crime where someone seeks out undefended wares, sometimes stalking the vans, just as a maritime Pirate looks for ships laden with goods that can be sold/profited from.

I'm not sure what you refer to in terms of property crime being less enforced these days. It doesn't seem like its any more accepted by the police or the courts today than it has been in the last 50 years.
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