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Old 02-23-2019, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Arizona
995 posts, read 1,029,490 times
Reputation: 1420

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At this rate, China could defeat us with a jar of Skippy.
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Old 02-23-2019, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
13,898 posts, read 7,619,321 times
Reputation: 52153
Did you ever eat Crackerjack? They could ban if off the planet and I wouldn't mind a bit Honestly, people who have peanut allergies should be responsible to ask and take care of themselves. The world doesn't need to stop just because an individual is allergic to peanuts. For those of you that want to eat that nightmare stuff you should have every right to do so. I'll take Circus Peanuts instead. I love those things and no peanuts at all.
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Old 02-23-2019, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,620 posts, read 1,109,838 times
Reputation: 5901
Quote:
Originally Posted by DecayingAngel View Post
Not about peanut allergies but sort of related to the discussion.

For as long as I can remember, there were no signs in doctors' offices regarding the wearing of scents of any kind. Then suddenly there are notices about not wearing any kind of perfume so as not to affect those who might be allergic to certain ingredients in them. It even goes so far that one will have his/her appointment canceled if you come in wearing a discernible perfume or other product.

This really bothers me. I really don't know anyone who has gotten ill from smelling roses, for instance. This is caving in to the rare percentage who actually have this allergy. So you lose your appointment if you come in lightly wearing a fragrance? If one is truly allergic, then wear a mask when at the doctor's. I work around my onion allergy and don't expect them to be banned from a restaurant.

I'm sure peanut allergies are much more common, which makes these notices the more ludicrous. Giving in to a small percentage of people is ridiculous. Honestly, it is going way too far.

One of my doctors has a notice about not discussing politics in the waiting room. When I asked about this, the receptionist said that people have actually starting screaming loudly at each other, disrupting everybody.
It's a crazy world.
I never recalled seeing signs regarding scents anywhere while I was growing up (70's & 80's) either; hell back then restaurants still had smoking sections and when you went in department stores the counter people would give you a spray of the new cologne/perfume.

One medical clinic I went to about a year ago had a sign asking people to not wear scents as a courtesy to those who were sensitive to them but did not threaten to send people home. Sounds like your doctor takes it to another level though!

My company's corporate office has a scent-free policy and it's stated on a sign in the lobby. They even have wipes by it so you can presumably de-scent yourself I guess. Luckily my site does not have this policy. One of the women I deal with at corporate all of the time is unhappy about the policy because she loves scented oils and diffusers but can no longer have them in her own office. We get some flak from the corporate group when they come down since we are not scent-free and people have all kinds of scent-y stuff in their offices and of course wear scents.

My daughter's school was peanut free which made it a challenge when she was young and on a peanut butter and jelly kick. Ever try explaining to a 4-year-old why she can't bring her peanut butter sandwich to school? *sigh*

I completely understand that some people have serious allergies but yes, things get a bit ridiculous.

The notice about not talking about politics though is over the top! Do people seriously follow this?
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Old 02-23-2019, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Arizona
995 posts, read 1,029,490 times
Reputation: 1420
Quote:
Originally Posted by animalcrazy View Post
Did you ever eat Crackerjack? They could ban if off the planet and I wouldn't mind a bit Honestly, people who have peanut allergies should be responsible to ask and take care of themselves. The world doesn't need to stop just because an individual is allergic to peanuts. For those of you that want to eat that nightmare stuff you should have every right to do so. I'll take Circus Peanuts instead. I love those things and no peanuts at all.
Of course. Everybody has had Crackerjacks at some point. Me and the other eleventy-five million people think they're great
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Old 02-23-2019, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
23,958 posts, read 22,944,636 times
Reputation: 29342
Quote:
Originally Posted by DecayingAngel View Post
I am allergic to onions, the worst offenders being raw or quickly fried as in onion rings. If they have been baked for a while, such as adding them to meat that is being baked in an oven, I'm fine because the ingredient my body reacts to is cooked out. I know garlic is related to onions, but it doesn't bother me and besides being delicious it adds so much to many dishes. As do onions, but oh well, could be worse.
I haven't been able to eat raw or lightly cooked onions for a very long time. I'm not allergic to them, but my digestive tract objects to them being inflicted upon it. It's not pretty.

There is a difference between allergy and intolerance. Eating a bit of raw or cooked onion won't kill me. I'd be miserable for a while, but I'd be alive.
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Old 02-25-2019, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Bay Area
10 posts, read 2,489 times
Reputation: 20
This is a serious topic. I do feel bad for the people that have any nut allergies, especially peanuts.
My mother has a peanut allergy so she is aware of what she eats everywhere she goes. Sometimes people find out that they are allergic later in life and have to find out like the age of 30. I think they can still sell peanuts at the ball park, but have it sold in a certain section or area at the park.
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Old 02-25-2019, 08:09 PM
 
390 posts, read 62,080 times
Reputation: 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by j7r6s View Post
That's like banning popcorn at movie theaters.
i was going to say before you even quoted the lyrics, "theyre going to sing 'buy me some and'"

i figured they would ban soda before crackerjacks. every pastime and cultural staple older than say, eating tide pods is considered so toxic now, im amazed they havent also banned baseball itself.
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Old 02-25-2019, 09:12 PM
 
19,203 posts, read 15,843,874 times
Reputation: 36159
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marie Joseph View Post
I never recalled seeing signs regarding scents anywhere while I was growing up (70's & 80's) either; hell back then restaurants still had smoking sections and when you went in department stores the counter people would give you a spray of the new cologne/perfume.

One medical clinic I went to about a year ago had a sign asking people to not wear scents as a courtesy to those who were sensitive to them but did not threaten to send people home. Sounds like your doctor takes it to another level though!

My company's corporate office has a scent-free policy and it's stated on a sign in the lobby. They even have wipes by it so you can presumably de-scent yourself I guess. Luckily my site does not have this policy. One of the women I deal with at corporate all of the time is unhappy about the policy because she loves scented oils and diffusers but can no longer have them in her own office. We get some flak from the corporate group when they come down since we are not scent-free and people have all kinds of scent-y stuff in their offices and of course wear scents.

My daughter's school was peanut free which made it a challenge when she was young and on a peanut butter and jelly kick. Ever try explaining to a 4-year-old why she can't bring her peanut butter sandwich to school? *sigh*

I completely understand that some people have serious allergies but yes, things get a bit ridiculous.

The notice about not talking about politics though is over the top! Do people seriously follow this?
My mother has the allergy to scents. They trigger migraines for her. She was a secretary and suffered terribly when co-workers wore heavy perfume. Back then she didn’t say anything but she’d have a headache all day at work. Like most rules, they are put into place not because if most people’s scent habits, but those who grossly over do it. It is much easier to set a blanket rule than try to determine appropriateness in a case by case basis. If it causes others to suffer though, is it really that huge a sacrifice not to wear perfume to work?
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Old 02-25-2019, 09:17 PM
 
19,203 posts, read 15,843,874 times
Reputation: 36159
Quote:
Originally Posted by dynamicjson View Post
i was going to say before you even quoted the lyrics, "theyre going to sing 'buy me some and'"

i figured they would ban soda before crackerjacks. every pastime and cultural staple older than say, eating tide pods is considered so toxic now, im amazed they havent also banned baseball itself.
Cracker Jack lost my loyalty when they stopped putting prizes in the box, and then stopped putting it in a box. At most ballparks its in a bag now. Now instead of s prize, you scan a barcode with a phone and it lets you play an online game. They have not been my beloved childhood tradition for a long time now, so I donít really care.
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Old 02-26-2019, 02:20 PM
 
767 posts, read 268,295 times
Reputation: 993
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Do you think anything with peanuts should be banned at ballparks (by owners) because some people are allergic to them or should peanut allergic people just not go to ballparks?
Anaphylactic shock is extremely rare among people with peanut allergies, so of course not, peanuts shouldn't be banned. People with allergies - the responsible ones, just carry their epi-pens just in case. Conversely, it's just a ball game, and people can go without peanuts for that time period so a ban is acceptable.
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