U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-17-2019, 05:57 PM
 
Location: southern kansas
8,071 posts, read 5,433,361 times
Reputation: 17526

Advertisements

To anyone who might feel 24 years in prison is a bit harsh... keep in mind that a large portion of those who commit crimes like this are repeat offenders & career criminals, and that's 24 years that at least one criminal won't be victimizing the public. I personally hate thieves, and do not care how long they stay in prison. The longer, the better IMO. No sympathy from me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-17-2019, 06:10 PM
 
65 posts, read 6,835 times
Reputation: 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by aslowdodge View Post
You always hear about the thieves, but never getting caught.yes itís back from 2015, but itís the first Iíve heard of someone getting caught and getting a substantial sentence.
This made my day

https://timesofsandiego.com/crime/20...ars-to-prison/

If you want a certain behavior to decrease, you need to up the deterrent. Maybe companies should post this story on their boxes......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
14,030 posts, read 11,150,066 times
Reputation: 10370
Quote:
Originally Posted by IDoPhysicsPhD View Post
Breaking into homes is very dangerous. It can lead to violence really quickly. Imagine being a parent with a young child and seeing a burglar in your home. How do you think any rational parent will react? How will the burglar retaliate? There's so many unknowns, but a viable path to violence ensuing.
I understand the potential. I also understand this is a growing crime in America with our move for online shopping and they want to set an example. So this is a move to protect Amazon and other similar companies as well as all of us that use their products.

It is just that compared to other crimes; the sentence appears harsh. We have seen judges pass down lenient sentences for crimes of violence and on repeat offenders. I am not really questioning because I feel I know the reasons why; I am just making a statement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 07:12 PM
 
1,016 posts, read 522,037 times
Reputation: 909
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I understand the potential. I also understand this is a growing crime in America with our move for online shopping and they want to set an example. So this is a move to protect Amazon and other similar companies as well as all of us that use their products.

It is just that compared to other crimes; the sentence appears harsh. We have seen judges pass down lenient sentences for crimes of violence and on repeat offenders. I am not really questioning because I feel I know the reasons why; I am just making a statement.
I don't see this as an example case at all. The lady here is a career criminal who has been arrested for breaking into homes multiple times. This was a three strikes and you're out situation. Being jailed multiple times in the past didn't help her become a better person.

Just because it was the theft of a package from a porch that led to her being caught, does not take away from the fact that she has a history of breaking into commercial and residential property to steal homes. They found a storage locker full of stuff she stole. If short terms of jail cannot help heal her, you stop putting her back into society.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
14,030 posts, read 11,150,066 times
Reputation: 10370
Quote:
Originally Posted by IDoPhysicsPhD View Post
I don't see this as an example case at all. The lady here is a career criminal who has been arrested for breaking into homes multiple times. This was a three strikes and you're out situation. Being jailed multiple times in the past didn't help her become a better person.

Just because it was the theft of a package from a porch that led to her being caught, does not take away from the fact that she has a history of breaking into commercial and residential property to steal homes. They found a storage locker full of stuff she stole. If short terms of jail cannot help heal her, you stop putting her back into society.
I believe in punishment for those that need it. I also understand why we gave her the 24 years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 11:23 PM
 
8,146 posts, read 3,249,538 times
Reputation: 21428
Quote:
Originally Posted by heart84 View Post
If you want a certain behavior to decrease, you need to up the deterrent. Maybe companies should post this story on their boxes......
Studies have shown that severe penalties don't deter crime. The threat of the death penalty doesn't deter crime.

What DOES deter crime, is the certainty of punishment. If you know for sure if you run a stop sign you will be fined $5, few people will do it. If you know the penalty is $150, but it's unlikely you'll get caught, you might do it.

Personally, I'm not rejoicing that this woman got 24 years for burglary. I'm not all that excited to foot the bill for her incarceration for a quarter century.

Personally, I think a 2 year sentence in prison would have been appropriate. And then, mandatory mental health care follow up after release for a few years.

Last edited by ClaraC; 02-17-2019 at 11:31 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2019, 08:35 AM
 
8,289 posts, read 2,072,781 times
Reputation: 5736
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
Studies have shown that severe penalties don't deter crime. The threat of the death penalty doesn't deter crime.

What DOES deter crime, is the certainty of punishment. If you know for sure if you run a stop sign you will be fined $5, few people will do it. If you know the penalty is $150, but it's unlikely you'll get caught, you might do it.

Personally, I'm not rejoicing that this woman got 24 years for burglary. I'm not all that excited to foot the bill for her incarceration for a quarter century.

Personally, I think a 2 year sentence in prison would have been appropriate. And then, mandatory mental health care follow up after release for a few years.
I read an article not long ago about how this new neural technology would be able to save billions of dollars in tax money, used to physically house prisoners for decades, centuries, and longer.


Basically a person would come in one day, and they put them in some kind of medical coma, and this new technology makes it seem to them, that they have spent years, even decades behind bars, but in reality, it would only take a single day, they would come in, go thru this and be done by the end of the day, but in their mind, they have spent many years confined.


I cannot remember all the details, but do recall there is some neural way they can do this effectively, and the brain not know the difference.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2019, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Jupiter
9,855 posts, read 5,879,872 times
Reputation: 7632
One less criminal off the street.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2019, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
25,695 posts, read 61,170,000 times
Reputation: 28709
She will be out on parole in six years, maybe less.

Long sentences do deter crime. At least crime against the general public. They cannot commit crimes wile in prison, except against other inmates. Reminds me of the silly studies that say death penalty does not deter crime. What? The recidivism rate of death penalty recipients is zero. Not one of them commits another crime after they are dead. Likewise not one person sitting in prison burglarizes homes or takes packages from porches. they are 1005 deterred while sitting in prison. (Except crime against other inmates).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2019, 11:28 AM
 
8,289 posts, read 2,072,781 times
Reputation: 5736
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Lead View Post
How does that help?

We get all the mental torture of a prison but none of the getting the person off the street for a time
'getting them off the street' should not be the ultimate goal, ensuring they do not do these things in the future is the real goal of punishment, learning from their mistakes in other words.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top