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Old 04-03-2019, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Queens, NY
3,793 posts, read 2,133,486 times
Reputation: 4750

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
It's easy after an incident like this to claim that you ALWAYS check the license plate of the Uber, or that you are ALWAYS aware of your surroundings and never let your guard down. I don't buy it, no one is perfect. People will generally start being more careful now with Ubers/Lyfts, but it won't last forever. They'll forget about this story eventually. People will never stop making mistakes that can get them hurt or killed, we're all human and we make mistakes. We're not "on" 24/7. It's one reason why I think it's so important to examine why acts of violence like this occur in the first place and how we can maybe try to stop them on the offenders' end before they even occur. Murdering someone like this otoh is not a mistake.
Growing up in NYC and getting taught by my parents to always be aware of my surroundings and what not. Yes, I can safely say that I'm pretty much ALWAYS aware of my surroundings and never let my guard down.

I didn't need this story to always check the plate of my Uber (or whatever) ride - since it's something I've done since I started using ride-sharing companies long ago.

The woman obviously messed up not verifying that it was actually her Uber ride, but the main and real person at fault is the person that killed her. No doubt about that. He deserves the death penalty (or have him rot deep in prison for the rest of his life without parole).
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Old 04-03-2019, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
438 posts, read 146,339 times
Reputation: 920
I'd say I check the license plate every time, but if it was *only* on the back of the car, I couldn't guarantee that either.



It's uncalled for to say she's an idiot, she just made a mistake that many people make without consequence and paid the ultimate price for it. I'm sure half the geniuses here calling her out make similar mistakes all the times. Similar as in usually end up not causing any problems but potentially highly dangerous (hint: every time you walk home at night from somewhere you do this).
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Old 04-03-2019, 07:50 PM
 
12,232 posts, read 10,155,788 times
Reputation: 16866
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorker11356 View Post
Growing up in NYC and getting taught by my parents to always be aware of my surroundings and what not. Yes, I can safely say that I'm pretty much ALWAYS aware of my surroundings and never let my guard down.

I didn't need this story to always check the plate of my Uber (or whatever) ride - since it's something I've done since I started using ride-sharing companies long ago.

The woman obviously messed up not verifying that it was actually her Uber ride, but the main and real person at fault is the person that killed her. No doubt about that. He deserves the death penalty (or have him rot deep in prison for the rest of his life without parole).
Pretty much always is not always is it? I, too, am "pretty much always" aware of my surroundings. I'm a very cautious person. I'm a worrier, I'm basically always thinking of worst case scenario, especially when I am out alone. But no one is perfect, myself included. I'd like to think I'd never be a victim like her, or even like Mollie Tibbetts (to address the post to me on the previous page, yes the facts are different but at the time, people were arguing all over the internet that Mollie should not have been running on a rural road with music on, so this "s/he should/should not have done this" game is always played). But I can't know for sure whether someone will fool me, whether I'll make a stupid mistake, whether I'll be too trusting.

SC has the death penalty but apparently has not executed anyone since 2011. I can't think of a better case than one like this, as long as they are sure he is the guy. Generally I don't support the death penalty only because of the chance of wrongful conviction, people have been wrongfully executed and nothing in the criminal justice system is really worse than that, but if we can be absolutely sure someone is guilty, in a crime like this I am all for it. Truly a random, senseless, unnecessary, cruel murder.
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Old 04-03-2019, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Sugarland
13,602 posts, read 12,377,148 times
Reputation: 16229
Quote:
Originally Posted by coschristi View Post
So what. If they would have been there; she would be alive.
You donít know that. I was just reading about the incident where a 17-year-old Muslim girl in Virginia was walking with her FRIENDS to a mosque and some VIOLENT MAN decided to attack her while she was with her FRIENDS, force her into his vehicle, and later raped and murdered her.
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Old 04-03-2019, 10:00 PM
 
4,902 posts, read 2,359,995 times
Reputation: 4457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet Like Sugar View Post
You don’t know that. I was just reading about the incident where a 17-year-old Muslim girl in Virginia was walking with her FRIENDS to a mosque and some VIOLENT MAN decided to attack her while she was with her FRIENDS, force her into his vehicle, and later raped and murdered her.
I think that victims of rape and murder do not need to be identified by religion, or even race, for that matter. The experience is the same for the victim.

Like Natalie Holloway in Aruba, Samantha made a mistake and paid with her life. Natalie's mother worked hard to increase awareness of the Buddy System for young women in foreign countries, but the rules apply at home as well. Anyone who goes out for more than one drink needs a buddy and they need a pact that they do not separate under any circumstances. If one needs to leave, they both leave. This would go a long way towards keeping young women safe, and reduce the possibility that they become accidental victims.

Both unwittingly, eagerly got into a car with the wrong person.
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Old 04-03-2019, 10:03 PM
 
Location: BFE
1,085 posts, read 309,125 times
Reputation: 3101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
Exactly.
Uber/Lyft are basically just modern-day cabs.
Ever been in a cab with Child Locks on the back doors? Rape Kits and Corpse Disposal tools in the trunk?

Yeah, I understand the scumbag perp who killed this gal wasn't an 'official' Uber driver, but how far from that was he really? Who screens these guys?

At least cab drivers had to go to an interview, probably provide a DMV driver history, background check and drive cars that aren't under their complete purview.

Uber just seems Cray to me. Sorry. I'm a Eff'in Luddite. I'd rather Hitch-Hike.
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Old 04-03-2019, 10:13 PM
 
4,902 posts, read 2,359,995 times
Reputation: 4457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatopescado View Post
Ever been in a cab with Child Locks on the back doors? Rape Kits and Corpse Disposal tools in the trunk?

Yeah, I understand the scumbag perp who killed this gal wasn't an 'official' Uber driver, but how far from that was he really? Who screens these guys?

At least cab drivers had to go to an interview, probably provide a DMV driver history, background check and drive cars that aren't under their complete purview.

Uber just seems Cray to me. Sorry. I'm a Eff'in Luddite. I'd rather Hitch-Hike.
There seems to be lots of information available about Uber drivers doing the wrong thing. It's a bit like Tinder, people take their chances. With Taxi drivers, there's more accountability.

This young woman couldn't find her roommate / friend at 2AM, so she walked out of a bar and got into a stranger's car. With a taxi, it's a lot harder to make that mistake. She did call a car service, but she didn't follow through.
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Old Yesterday, 12:06 AM
Status: "We're all in this alone!" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Lancaster, SC
6,819 posts, read 4,207,588 times
Reputation: 8154
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
Like Natalie Holloway in Aruba, Samantha made a mistake and paid with her life. Natalie's mother worked hard to increase awareness of the Buddy System for young women in foreign countries, but the rules apply at home as well.
There is a movement in wake of this unfortunate death called "What's my name"? that I believe even Samantha Josephson's family is a part of.
Quote:
The premise of the hashtag is simple: for your safety, ask the driver you approach to tell you your name. Both Uber and Lyft drivers should have access to that information on their phones and be able to tell you who they are supposed to be picking up.
I hate that it takes someone's death to bring these matters into the light while at the same time I hope her death makes otehrs consider their own safety after this.

‘What’s my name?’: Killing of South Carolina student inspires ride-share safety campaign
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Old Yesterday, 12:09 AM
Status: "We're all in this alone!" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Lancaster, SC
6,819 posts, read 4,207,588 times
Reputation: 8154
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatopescado View Post
At least cab drivers had to go to an interview, probably provide a DMV driver history, background check and drive cars that aren't under their complete purview.
I wonder about some cab companies and their background checks. Also, sometimes the cab drivers own their own taxi cabs. I wouldn't consider a cab any safer than Uber or Lyft.
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Old Yesterday, 02:28 AM
 
Location: Sugarland
13,602 posts, read 12,377,148 times
Reputation: 16229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
I think that victims of rape and murder do not need to be identified by religion, or even race, for that matter. The experience is the same for the victim.

Like Natalie Holloway in Aruba, Samantha made a mistake and paid with her life. Natalie's mother worked hard to increase awareness of the Buddy System for young women in foreign countries, but the rules apply at home as well. Anyone who goes out for more than one drink needs a buddy and they need a pact that they do not separate under any circumstances. If one needs to leave, they both leave. This would go a long way towards keeping young women safe, and reduce the possibility that they become accidental victims.

Both unwittingly, eagerly got into a car with the wrong person.
Yes, Iím not concerned about her religion, but thatís the way she was identified in the article that I read.
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