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Old 04-15-2019, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
11,917 posts, read 9,922,920 times
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That thing is like velociraptor.
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Old 04-15-2019, 08:10 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
76,331 posts, read 68,420,594 times
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Whatever gave him the idea to breed the most dangerous birds on the planet? How do you decide, that that's a good idea?
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Old 04-15-2019, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Cumberland Co., TN
21,224 posts, read 21,325,661 times
Reputation: 21209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburban_Guy View Post
I don't think he quite reaches the level of a Darwin winner, as I believe he's been dealing with these birds for many years and knew all about them.

Just an unfortunate situation where he fell and the bird's natural but deadly instinct kicked in.

I'm not surprised this bird is called the deadliest bird in the world.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgUdRo9eYoQ


I guess thats better than pigs. At least the bird didnt eat him.
https://dailycaller.com/2019/02/08/w...gs-russia-eat/
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Old 04-15-2019, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Formerly Pleasanton Ca, now in Marietta Ga
5,085 posts, read 3,875,701 times
Reputation: 6742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Whatever gave him the idea to breed the most dangerous birds on the planet? How do you decide, that that's a good idea?
I guess itís the same for people that breed other dangerous animals like poisonous snakes.
Regular non poisonous snakes are fine for me.
Some people breed Gila monsters because they are interesting and you can sell the off spring for pretty high prices.
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Old 04-15-2019, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
8,955 posts, read 6,160,084 times
Reputation: 11155
Quote:
Originally Posted by aslowdodge View Post
I guess itís the same for people that breed other dangerous animals like poisonous snakes.
Regular non poisonous snakes are fine for me.
Some people breed Gila monsters because they are interesting and you can sell the off spring for pretty high prices.
Or even tarantulas for example.
Tarantulas don't "like" their owners. There is nothing affectionate about them. They want to be left alone. And yet...
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Old 04-15-2019, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Colorado
11,187 posts, read 6,962,218 times
Reputation: 20104
My thought about this news story was...

The only time I ever saw Steve Irwin show real fear on an episode of his show before he died, was when a cassowary got loose at the zoo. I figure if Australians are afraid of it, then no one needs to try and keep one as a pet or whatever. And yet, Florida Man will probably try anyways.

OP's mention of ESAs was ridiculous. I'm fairly sure that no one ever has or would try to keep a cassowary as an ESA. Maybe an "ASA." ("Assisted Suicide Animal.")
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Old 04-15-2019, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
4,730 posts, read 1,872,481 times
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It sounds to me like these birds are not much of a threat to humans in the wild, but in captivity, they are dangerous as hell.

Quote:
Attacks to humans and domestic animals by the southern cassowary (Casuarius casuarius johnsonii) in Queensland, Australia


The southern cassowary Casuarius casuarius johnsonii is endemic to the tropical rainforests of north-eastern Queensland, Australia. This species is Australia's largest bird and holds a reputation for being dangerous. Cassowaries and ostriches are the only birds world-wide that have caused human deaths by physical attack. Incidents occur every year in Queensland, most at Mission Beach (110 km south of Cairns) and Lake Barrine (39 km south-west of Cairns), but previously also at Mount Whitfield in Cairns. The incidence of cassowary attacks in Queensland is reviewed. Data were obtained for 221 cassowary attacks, of which 150 were against humans, 75% of these by cassowaries fed previously by people. The feeding of cassowaries appears to change their natural behaviour, making them bold and aggressive. Victims were chased or charged in 71% of the incidents, and kicked in 15%. Less frequent actions included pushing, pecking, jumping on, butting with the head and snatching food. The cassowaries appeared to be expecting or soliciting food from humans (73% of the incidents), defending food (5%), and defending themselves (15%) or their chicks or eggs (7%). Contrary to popular belief, jogging did not incite cassowaries to attack. Although cassowaries should not be considered dangerous, they can cause serious injuries. Seven attacks against humans resulted in serious injuries (puncture wounds, lacerations, broken bone) and subsequently one death, caused by cassowaries kicking or jumping on victims. In the single fatal attack, the victim was trying to kill the cassowary. Four of the seven seriously injured victims were crouching or lying on the ground.
Attacks to humans and domestic animals by the southern cassowary (Casuarius casuarius johnsonii) in Queensland, Australia _ Journal of Zoology _ Cambridge Core
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Old 04-15-2019, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
8,955 posts, read 6,160,084 times
Reputation: 11155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
It sounds to me like these birds are not much of a threat to humans in the wild, but in captivity, they are dangerous as hell.



Attacks to humans and domestic animals by the southern cassowary (Casuarius casuarius johnsonii) in Queensland, Australia _ Journal of Zoology _ Cambridge Core
Right.

Now that being said, why would anyone want to feed a wild one? I'm pretty sure it's able to feed itself just fine.
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Old 04-15-2019, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
4,730 posts, read 1,872,481 times
Reputation: 6168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
Right.

Now that being said, why would anyone want to feed a wild one? I'm pretty sure it's able to feed itself just fine.
I don't think anyone would want to feed a wild one. It would probably be impossible anyways. The wild birds are timid and stay away from people. But if you want to breed them, you have to feed them. That's when you have a problem. That changes their natural behaviour, making them bold and aggressive. It's a dangerous situation.
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Old 04-15-2019, 01:10 PM
 
Location: on the wind
6,140 posts, read 2,435,118 times
Reputation: 20909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Geek View Post
That thing is like velociraptor.
Without hands however.

BTW, velociraptors were not the ancestors of modern birds...sorry movie fans.
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