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Old Today, 12:51 PM
 
33,078 posts, read 16,919,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ditchoc View Post
No doubt, boat design could have incorporated additional safety measures including a better means to escape.
That's the thing - one can always design a boat that does one thing crazy well. It's always a compromise - including keeping sure that the boat fulfills its actual purpose, as well.
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Old Today, 01:09 PM
 
33,078 posts, read 16,919,978 times
Reputation: 17940
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMBGBlueCanary View Post
I don't think they have fire fighting suits on a boat like that. At least, I've never seen anything like that on any boat (either day trip or live aboard).
Would be extremely unusual. I dip my toes in these waters as a volunteer deckhand on an inspected small passenger vessel (90-ft deck) and I've never heard of anyone doing so.
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Old Today, 01:20 PM
 
5,036 posts, read 2,259,318 times
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The mayday is said to have gone out a 3:15 am. A responding fire fighter posted a picture of the boat all but burned to the waterline and he states the photo was taken about 3:28 or only 13 minutes later.


Listening to the mayday call indicates some confusion. In general the Coast Guard dispatcher is asking questions to clarify the situation, trying to determine why the people can not get off the boat and if anyone can try to help them. He asks standard questions about the ability to suppress the fire.


So ... making some broad assumptions that the 3:15 mayday call occurred as soon as the fire was discovered and the fire department boat was on scene, throwing water 13 minutes later and a 75 foot boat was already totally burned out.


There is one point of speculation. The boat was made of wood. Nitrox, a oxygen enriched gas was available for those certified to use it. Where normal air is 21% oxygen, Nitrox can vary from about 32% to 36% oxygen for recreational divers. IF there were some sort of oxygen leak on board, a small fire could turn into a blowtorch pretty quickly as long as there is a fuel source...e.g wood.



If pure oxygen gas were being released into "normal air" it would diffuse or mix pretty quickly, neither rising or falling. If the air was relatively confined in a space such a bunk room or salon, over time it could potentially increase the normal 21% oxygen concentration to something higher which could potentially improve combustion. Again, all pure speculation.


One thing is pretty obvious. Once this fire got started, it managed to burn a large vessel up almost completely in a very short amount time.


If you have time, there are many possibilities for action. If you have no time, all you can do is run for your life.
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Old Today, 01:28 PM
 
Location: West coast
245 posts, read 88,324 times
Reputation: 383
When you first enter the the main salon area from the back deck there are a couple of tables w/bench seating.
These tables have a bunch of outlets where you plug in your batteries.
It is common to see a good half a dozen batteries being charged at any given moment.
I have no proof or anything but a chain reaction zapping a bunch of the batteries sound feasible.
The forward escape hatch is rather a joke.
I mean come on climb on top of a third bunk and twist your body who thought and approved that??
The boat was full not over full by a legal standpoint.
I still have a problem with thinking these people were not given a proper alarm or warning.
There will be some new rules.
Sorry to blabber on but this is very upsetting.
It’s a small community and most everyone knows you or knows somebody that knows you.
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Old Today, 01:32 PM
 
17,603 posts, read 10,526,538 times
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Well, NTSB will release report in about 10 days or so, we shall see what their conclusion is.
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Old Today, 01:35 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,728 posts, read 3,235,463 times
Reputation: 26238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Hepburn View Post
Blamers LOVE to blame.
Yes they do. They have no shame, especially from the safe cocoon of their basement computer chair where they watch superhero movies, play video games, and expose their spiteful ignorance on multiple topics to the web at large. Even someone who's done nothing more frightening than put out a backyard BBQ flame up should be able to wait until experts investigate before condemning anyone. I can't even imagine how the survivors are feeling. The stuff of a PTSD's sufferer's nightmares; some would say worse than not surviving at all.

Last edited by Parnassia; Today at 01:58 PM..
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Old Today, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9,497 posts, read 8,496,163 times
Reputation: 20783
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvmensch View Post
Not really. In fact virtually all boats leak. The systems expect this. An emergency port well above the water line would not be a problem. Simply an expense to include and maintain.

Most ocean going boats can sustain a wave breaking fully over the boat.
Sleeping quarters are always in the bottom of a boat. The best would be an escape hatch that opens into the galley which boats have. It is impossible to make one that opens to the outside of the boat without compromising the integrity of the vessel. A half hour of waves breaking over your bow and into the cockpit are very different from doing a crossing of any length of time with an escape hatch on the side of the boat even above the water line.

It's never been done because it will not work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
There would have been plenty of room for many escape hatches on the lower level. I will bet you any amount of money, that it will be a requirement on all new boats after this incident.
No, it will not happen. There are other things boatmakers put into place. Exterior escape hatches ain't it.

Marine fires burn very fast and very hot.

At a minimum marine paint is toxically flammable.

Recently:

https://wsvn.com/news/local/luxury-y...erdale-marina/

And another.

https://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/2...ch-city-marina
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Old Today, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Lone Mountain Las Vegas NV
13,299 posts, read 5,088,000 times
Reputation: 5883
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
Sleeping quarters are always in the bottom of a boat. The best would be an escape hatch that opens into the galley which boats have. It is impossible to make one that opens to the outside of the boat without compromising the integrity of the vessel. A half hour of waves breaking over your bow and into the cockpit are very different from doing a crossing of any length of time with an escape hatch on the side of the boat even above the water line.

It's never been done because it will not work.



No, it will not happen. There are other things boatmakers put into place. Exterior escape hatches ain't it.

Marine fires burn very fast and very hot.

At a minimum marine paint is toxically flammable.

Recently:

https://wsvn.com/news/local/luxury-y...erdale-marina/

And another.

https://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/2...ch-city-marina
Actually a forward hatch into the cabin is almost standard on larger sailboats. And rear hatches are not uncommon on power boats. And various open-able hatches on larger boats above the water line are actually quite common.

And the submarine incident lasted two and a half days. Particularly fun in the middle of the night. Sufficiently dangerous that the helmsman was always tied to the boat. The actual message from that trip was if you run in front of a major storm don't let it catch you.
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Old Today, 01:57 PM
 
21,380 posts, read 17,010,739 times
Reputation: 39861
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
34 people jammed into one room is overloaded IMHO. The crew certainly did abandon them. Five of the six crew members left the boat. None of the passengers did. The Coast Guard ordered them to return to the boat and try to rescue the trapped passengers. Which is what they should have done on their own.
The person went to the specs for this specific model of boat and itís approved for 46 passengers so wrong again. You donít know what that coast guard told them, in fact it doesnít even make sense. Itís like saying the firemen ordered the teachers to run back into a burning school to save the kids. You have no idea what the crew tried or didnít try. But again they are young people making a modest living on a dive boat they arenít first responders (while the Coast Guard are) and have no obligation to give their lives to run through fire. If your hotel catches fire do you expect the front desk clerk to run through fire to save you? Iím sure if it were possible to save people without dying themselves they would have.
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Old Today, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9,497 posts, read 8,496,163 times
Reputation: 20783
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvmensch View Post
Actually a forward hatch into the cabin is almost standard on larger sailboats. And rear hatches are not uncommon on power boats. And various open-able hatches on larger boats above the water line are actually quite common.
Most boats in the 30-38 foot range have a hatch in the V-Berth. It isn't made to come off.

They are also a problem because they leak doing damage to the v-berth.

Boatmakers are getting away from that because it is a problem.
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