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Old 09-04-2019, 06:03 PM
 
17,626 posts, read 10,553,016 times
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Poor woman.

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/roos...203433980.html

Quote:
A woman in Australia died after being attacked by one of her roosters, according to a new case reportóand as highly unlikely as it sounds (and, honestly, is) the incident will leave you paying a little more attention to some veins on your legs.

The case report, detailed in the journal Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology, tells of a 76-year-old woman who was collecting chicken eggs on her property when a rooster started pecking at her lower left leg. That pecking caused a "significant hemorrhage," that caused the woman to collapse. She eventually died of her injuries.
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Old 09-04-2019, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Olympia area (for now)
1,580 posts, read 585,982 times
Reputation: 3223
I’m surprised it wasn’t spurs instead of pecking. Roosters have very sharp spurs and when they fly at you, their spurs are what they use to attack. I read the article, but it wasn’t clear why she let this rooster peck at her leg without using something to shoo him away. She should not have let him invade her space like that. One thing is sure, he will end up in the stew pot.
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Old 09-05-2019, 01:53 AM
 
Location: on the wind
7,785 posts, read 3,268,116 times
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Chickens peck at things, sometimes obsessively. This wasn't an actual attack and this bird was not bred to fight. It may not even have spurs. Many breeds that are kept in flocks have been bred to have small to nonexistent spurs so they can't injure each other. Obviously fighting ***** have to be kept singly. They are not the sharpest knives in the drawer and will stand there blindly pecking at something until something else makes them stop. They will peck at and eat raw meat too. They can mercilessly peck at wounds on a weaker bird in the coop until they either kill it or it dies from blood loss and shock. Doves and pigeons are known to do the same. So much for the "peaceful" dove. They can be brutal to each other. Why this woman wasn't able to leave the coop or shoo the bird away before she collapsed is the question.
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Old 09-05-2019, 03:55 AM
 
3,415 posts, read 1,672,175 times
Reputation: 3554
Poor lady. I was attacked by a rooster that appeared to be minding its own business. As soon as I turned away from it, it came after me. The owner did say it was probably the spurs instead of pecking as Taz22 mentioned. It did become soup.
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Old 09-05-2019, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Texas
4,025 posts, read 3,378,050 times
Reputation: 7023
When I saw the headline, I assumed he got a peck and it got infected, she ended up with sepsis etc.

But nope, she bled out.........pretty crazy.
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Old 09-05-2019, 12:18 PM
 
Location: southern kansas
8,596 posts, read 5,985,677 times
Reputation: 19296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taz22 View Post
Iím surprised it wasnít spurs instead of pecking. Roosters have very sharp spurs and when they fly at you, their spurs are what they use to attack. I read the article, but it wasnít clear why she let this rooster peck at her leg without using something to shoo him away. She should not have let him invade her space like that. One thing is sure, he will end up in the stew pot.
Growing up on my grandmothers farm in the 50's, getting pecked at by the chickens & roosters was an everyday thing, and we didn't think much about it. Grandma always raised them for food and eggs, and decades of gathering eggs left the backs of her hands a bit scarred (yes, ankles too). It wasn't unheard of for her to get snake bit in that dark hen house when reaching into a nest for the eggs. Point is you just get used to that sort of thing and don't think much about it.
But in this case it sounds like the woman had a medical condition, and I agree that she should have been more careful about getting pecked & wounded.
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Old Today, 09:45 AM
KCZ
 
1,779 posts, read 1,029,045 times
Reputation: 4915
A varicose vein can bleed profusely but it's a low pressure vessel and bleeding can be controlled with direct compression. It doesn't spurt rapidly under pressure like an artery. Unless this pecking episode happened miles from a phone, I don't understand how she died from exsanguination. There's more to this story.
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