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Old Yesterday, 05:41 PM
Status: "eDgy as h*ck" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Colatown, South Carolina
7,941 posts, read 4,684,026 times
Reputation: 9401

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rstevens62 View Post
Kind of surprising these trains only operated for 20 yrs, seems like they were built like tanks and could still be working today.
They were retired near the end of the steam era or I suspect they would have kept running them. For example, the two steam engines at the Tennessee Valley Railroad were buit in the early 1900s. Without looking it up, I think their Southern Railway #630 was built in 1904 and is still running.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rstevens62 View Post
There are many people that believe steam is the way to go in relation to power sources for our vehicles (modernized of course).
For a freight railroad to operate a fleet of steam engines, it would be wildly expensive. Over the road trains generally have two crew members today. You would need more than that now as one crew can run all the locomotives from the head engine no matter how many engines there are. Of course, UP converts their heritage steam fleet to burn oil. Not sure how that might extrapolate to building new steam engines. Then there are the shop crews as steam engines need a lot more maintenance than diesel.
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Old Yesterday, 06:18 PM
 
33,431 posts, read 17,124,467 times
Reputation: 18241
Quote:
Originally Posted by rstevens62 View Post
Kind of surprising these trains only operated for 20 yrs, seems like they were built like tanks and could still be working today.
A bit like clipper ships - that last iteration of a technology tends to be the most refined. But as with sailing ships, emerging technologies could do the job just as well, and much cheaper.
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Old Yesterday, 09:48 PM
 
3,355 posts, read 2,349,724 times
Reputation: 3747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgustedman View Post
Yep, youtube has it...No won't give the link, sheesh, go look for yourselves!
Lot of debate about posting that video out of respect for the family I think I would have cut the video before she was hit. I know some have said to leave it up try to deter others from doing what she did, but does it really deter someone? Probably just causes pain for the family.
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Old Yesterday, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
22,180 posts, read 14,853,815 times
Reputation: 16445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Ag 93 View Post
Wow, that train really is massive.
I've seen it under full steam. Massive hardly describes it! At 60 mph, pulling a line of freight cars a mile long, the Big Boy isn't even breathing hard.

I knew a railroad man who worked in the Ogden yards. Back in their day, the Big Boys would commonly do 90 mph pulling coal trains to the coast on the run through Wyoming.

They were specifically designed by the Union Pacific to haul big and fast over the Great Divide, and the Baldwin Locomotive company never wanted to make a locomotive that large, but did because the U.P. offered them so much money to do it. The logistics of running them seemed impossible to Baldwin.

The are essentially 2 of Baldwin's smaller locomotives strapped together on one huge chassis. 2 boilers, 2 sets of drivers, and each operating independently of the other. The pair swapped operation back and forth, or would work in tandem as was needed.

This allowed the Big Boy enormous power reserve; on flat land, one boiler was in full operation while the other loafed to economize the fuel and water. But once on one of the long up-hill grades, the second boiler could kick into full power in a couple of minutes. This allowed no drop in locomotive power.

U.P. had used a pair of independent engines on those runs for the same purpose for some time, but by WWII, the need for coal in the war industry really put the Big Boys to use.

Ironically, the Big Boy was actually shorter, lighter, and more powerful than using 2 smaller engines, so the guys at the Union Pacific had the right idea.

The Northern Pacific designed a competing engine, the Yellowstone, which was almost as large, to haul copper ore out of the Butte mining district.
The Yellowstones were never as powerful, but only because the Anaconda Mine required them to use the soft bituminous coal from an Anaconda-owned coal mine. U.P. used the hard anthracite coal only in the Big Boys which burns much, much hotter.
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Old Yesterday, 11:00 PM
 
33,431 posts, read 17,124,467 times
Reputation: 18241
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe the Photog View Post
Then there are the shop crews as steam engines need a lot more maintenance than diesel.
Not to forget that boilers are seriously freakin' terrifying when something goes wrong. People who run navy nuclear propulsion plants will tell you that the reactor instills deep respect, but high-pressure steam is something to outright fear.
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Old Today, 07:29 AM
 
10,770 posts, read 12,673,961 times
Reputation: 15290
Its cool but not sure I'd drive more than an hour round trip to go see it.
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Old Today, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
1,425 posts, read 649,463 times
Reputation: 2293
I almost don’t blame them for chasing after a train! It’s absolutely huge!
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Old Today, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
18,505 posts, read 11,700,088 times
Reputation: 39008
I guess this falls under the category of "Distracted driving " !
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