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Old 02-17-2014, 11:26 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,698,541 times
Reputation: 26671

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This is a roundup of economic benefits of cycling:

Four reasons US business leaders want to import Danish-style cycling | Guardian Sustainable Business | theguardian.com

Quote:
"Cities that invest in biking infrastructure are going to win," predicts Jeff Judge, a Chicago-based digital marketing entrepreneur, who said the presence of on-street protected bike lanes was his number-one factor in assessing a city to locate in. "It's better for business, planning, infrastructure. It's better all round."
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Old 02-24-2014, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Under a bridge
2,423 posts, read 3,144,917 times
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I'm all for it. As a cyclist I would like to see more bicycle infrastructure. The only thing is how do we pay for more/better bicycle infrastructure? Protected bike lanes cost money but IMO these protected bike lanes would encourage more people to ride.

Cheers.
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Old 03-19-2014, 07:34 PM
 
105 posts, read 129,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
This article is very poorly written and is simply misleading on all aspects of cycling.

1. The author mentions 5 of the most liberal cities in the US where cycling was present even before bicycle infrastructure; San Fran, Chicago, Austin, DC, and Portland. Also all those cities are compact and lack parking. Except Austin which has a liberal/libertarian college population of 50,000

2. This article is the same as every other "pro-cycling" article; It assumes coincidence (bicycle infrastructure and a cycling public) equals causation.

3. It keeps mentioning the "wonderland/nirvana" of Europe to get people to jump on the bandwagon. ("Northern Europe does it, so we should do it"). Northern European cities are also compact. That kind of Eurocentricism, diverts attention from the most successful cycling movements in the world; the ones in Mexico and Colombia.

4. The article targets America but does not take into consideration America's differing cities; not liberal, no parks or greenspaces, sprawled, no rivers. This is important because without uninterrupted land bicycle infrastructure becomes next to impossible. Example, name the bicycle infrastructure in Chicago....Lake Shore Drive along Lake Michigan which is uninterrupted, name another, none, exactly. Because bicycle infrastructure is difficult to implement correctly regardless of what the article says. Which leaves cyclists with b.s. bicycle lanes with drivesways every 10 feet.

5. The article could be a bigger benefit by focusing on practicality rather then blind cheerleading
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Old 03-21-2014, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,698,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muer22 View Post
This article is very poorly written and is simply misleading on all aspects of cycling.

1. The author mentions 5 of the most liberal cities in the US where cycling was present even before bicycle infrastructure; San Fran, Chicago, Austin, DC, and Portland. Also all those cities are compact and lack parking. Except Austin which has a liberal/libertarian college population of 50,000
Biking is on the rise in my city. Coincidentally the number of bike lanes has increases a ton over 5 years. I never saw bicyclists in my street till they added sharrows and a lane. I've been living in the same place for 9 years..... Oakland dung super compact, though most neighborhoods have main streets. And many places are easy enough to park in. People are still biking. I see way more people everywhere. Families and bike trailers. Grey haired people. People of all ethnic groups (not just white hipsters). Something is going on.....

It is not just liberal places jumping on the bandwagon either.....

Indianapolis Mayor Ballard on Bike Lanes & Infrastructure | Bicycling Magazine

Indy is going all in. Memphis too.

This is a boosterish article, but studies match up pretty well in terms of infrastructure and numbers of people biking. Even in San Francisco.

The difference the portion of people not riding explicitly for exercise is increasing. People are going to work, the farmers market the library, and the grocery store. My whole foods parking lot is packed, for both cars and bikes.

** I have seen good coverage of South America, Central America and Mexican but Northern Europe is ahead if the curve on physically separated lanes.
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Old 03-21-2014, 08:26 PM
 
105 posts, read 129,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Biking is on the rise in my city...Oakland
Good points, but Oakland is quite liberal. People in Oakland more there partly because of the lifestyle which includes cycling, going to Whole Foods, etc.



Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post

Has this translated to more utility cycling? How efficiently. Something tells me if you built 100 miles of bicycle lanes in Copenhagen you would get 30000 cyclists.

To this point, Mainly Mexican cities do not have many bicycle lanes because they dont have the green space and their cities are massive - like the USA, but instead they have fought an image battle by taking over the streets every Sunday. This allows otherwise motorists to experience cycling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
This is a boosterish article, but studies match up pretty well in terms of infrastructure and numbers of people biking. Even in San Francisco.
No it is not boosterish it is a lie. It disguises an agenda as research. A real study uses a control group. San Francisco and Austin are not unbiased control groups.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
** I have seen good coverage of South America, Central America and Mexican but Northern Europe is ahead if the curve on physically separated lanes.
Believe me, outside Oakland, you do not here people say "I wish the US cities were more like Bogota", even though Bogota and Guadalajara are a better comparison to most US cities, maybe not Oakland and San Francisco.
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Old 03-21-2014, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,698,541 times
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Memphis, hardly a liberal bastion seems to be working in it too
Memphis, TN: America

And bike commuting is up almost everywhere:

Is Bicycle Commuting Really Catching On? And if So, Where? - Mark Byrnes - The Atlantic Cities
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Old 03-22-2014, 05:04 AM
 
105 posts, read 129,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Memphis, hardly a liberal bastion seems to be working in it too
Memphis, TN: America

And bike commuting is up almost everywhere:

Is Bicycle Commuting Really Catching On? And if So, Where? - Mark Byrnes - The Atlantic Cities
I am not saying only liberal cities build bicycle infrastructure. Any city is capable of building infrastructure. My question is how many of those non-liberal cities have translated infrastructure into actual new bicycle riding as the "studies" showed? My mistake, not bicycle riding, bicycle TRANSIT riding that replaces automobile traffic. If you do have an efficient translation of infrastructure to utility cyclists then the basis of the "go Danish" article is no longer true.

I have lived in places like Dallas where bicycle shop owners have told me "You CAN'T ride a bicycle in Dallas". I did anyway. I am just trying to tell you that mentality is present in many southern cities.

I disagree. Memphis is southern but not conservative. You had the worker strikes in Memphis. How many Southern cities had large scale worker strikes? How many US cities in the past 60 years have had crippling worker strikes? Let's not forget that Steve Cohen, the most liberal member of congress represents Memphis as a Democratic Tennessee representative. Al Gore also represented Tennessee as a Senator for many years.

As the second article states, the Southeast is a unique region. It does not take an expert to know this. It is the basis of my post.
"Cities in the Southwest saw modest gains in comparison to the previously mentioned regions and in fact, hosted just as many cities that actually saw a decrease (four of the nine surveyed) as the Southeast. Like the Northeast and Midwest, overall ridership levels in 2000 were fairly low, leading to decent increases while still having particularly low overall totals."

For some reason, the second link you gave me actually shows Memphis as having a decreasing bicycle ridership...I am not sure about that reported statistic, it might be an error. The other areas in the South as places like New Orleans (very liberal) with a large out of state population.

But Atlanta is a good example the second article provided.
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Old 03-22-2014, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,698,541 times
Reputation: 26671
I do agree that people do not think of biking as transportation. Even in CA. But I think more people are catching on. There are new special bike shops catering to this. I heard about one targeting women with a good focus on transportation cycling in Greenville or Darlington South Carolina!

Of course all of this coverage ignores the "invisible cyclists." Aka people who can't afford another option. Who are typically non white and are in the margins with limited safety equipment. Unfortunately in the US it only counts when white middle class people are doing it.
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Old 03-29-2014, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,485 posts, read 43,812,291 times
Reputation: 47263
how a Dutch guy see U.S. cycling

A Dutch Guy Is Disgusted By America, But He Has A Hell Of A Point
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Old 05-11-2014, 10:50 PM
 
211 posts, read 276,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muer22 View Post
I disagree. Memphis is southern but not conservative. You had the worker strikes in Memphis. How many Southern cities had large scale worker strikes?
I took a day trip to Chattanooga recently after the VW workers voted not to unionize. I went there to ride and was amazed by how many riders they had. Their mayor is democratic, yet their house Representative is a Republican. The point of all this to me is that you can't neatly package cities or people into groups of liberal and conservative. I think one thing that is helping Chattanooga and Memphis along in this effort is how much urban decay there is. With this generation we are seeing those urban areas reclaimed by people open to the idea of not owning a car.

Quote:
No it is not boosterish it is a lie. It disguises an agenda as research. A real study uses a control group. San Francisco and Austin are not unbiased control groups.
I am curious about what your control group would be? Cities do tend to lean to the liberal side. I came up with this article making an argument for each of the listed cities as a destination for conservatives:

13 Best Cities for Conservatives to Live


Most of those cities have good or even premier (by US standards) bike infrastructure. I was a bit interested to note that Anaheim is a bit of a bike lane black hole in the LA area. I'll certainly give you that most of the research is biased, as is typical for sociological research. It's very hard for sociology to overcome the biases of its researcher - we see this working out in threads just like these where everybody can pull up statistics and information that confirms what we want to be true about the society we live in. All I know is that city governments now feel like they need to have a bike plan in place to compete with other cities, and I think that is positive.
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