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Old 06-12-2010, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in Texas
5,199 posts, read 11,343,400 times
Reputation: 2590

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TXRunner View Post
If you are a really good teacher, then you don't really care about pay all that much. I stay after school every day for some kind of club/activity or tutoring and get no pay for it. I could easily leave after school and go home. I don't because I love doing those activities. I don't complain about not getting paid for it. If money is an issue then don't become a teacher. Do something else.

I think teaching is a good deal. You get to be your own boss, do what you want each day and don't have to work with adults. I don't have to deal with social drama and climbing corporate ladders. If you like the things you teach, then coming up with interesting lessons is actually enjoyable. Grading papers never is enjoyable, but if you do a little bit each day then it really isn't that much work.

If you want teachers to get paid 100k or 200k, then how are we going to pay for that? Raise property taxes to unbelievable limits? I mean I love teaching and everything, but really I'm teaching kids to add some fractions, I'm not doing brain surgery here. If I wanted 200k per year then I would have become a doctor.
Amen! I couldn't agree more. I remember one Christmas at our family gathering how one of my "know-it-all" nephews put down teaching terribly because "there was no money in it." His daughter had recently announced she wanted to be a teacher. Then one of my nieces-in-law chimed in. My daughter and her husband-to-be were teachers. They sat there listening to their garbage. Of course, with their great character traits, they did not argue about such bizarre comments. People just praise that almighty dollar. It's just so ridiculous.
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Old 06-12-2010, 08:14 AM
 
27,447 posts, read 44,947,050 times
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some states--mainly those with strong unions--do have exceptional pay for teachers...
those states/unions are really coming under fire because salaries and the retirement pensions they can turn in to are are huge drain on the budgets for school districts--and the states/towns/districts that fund them...

some states DO give decent raises and pay for longevity and teachers who acquire masters and even PhDs for public school employees--in some states there ARE teachers in public schools with PhDs--vs TX where normally it is only the superintendent or head of curriculum or counseling in larger districts that have PhDs...because it is not cost effective for teachers/admins to get them since their salaries would not really increase that much...

there are many public ISDs in this part of the state and probably in Houston/San Antonio/Austin area that pay a good starting salary--say 48K for 10 mo work--while it does not really pay for all the extra time a teacher puts it--it is a decent start...
the problem comes with longevity--
as teachers gain experience and stay in the profession longer--especially male teachers--they become responsible for families--
the cost of health care for a familiy vs an individual teacher is HUGE--sometimes districts will cover ALL he ins cost for a single teacher--but the cost for a teacher/spouse can be 400% more and for a family with children the cost can be so expensive that a teacher with ONE INCOME in the family can't afford to pay for health insurance...

raises for teachers normally increase very minutely--about 1K a year--that is less than 100 a month since teachers get their contract salary paid out over 12 mo vs the 10 mo of their contracts--
supposedly that is to THEIR benefit so they don't run out of money before school starts again--but actually it is to the districts' benefit since the districts get to sit on the money in their accounts and earn interest on those extra two months --over time it adds up...

the state lately has added bonus money to increase teachers' salaries but that can't be counted on to occur every year...
in the business world before the last economic crunch==and depending on your professional/business field--someone could be looking at pay raises of 3-4-6% with no promotion and if there was a promotion then I guess it could be 20% or more depending on the significance of the promotion...
when a teacher takes over as head of department --that is maybe a 2-3K stipend--and lot more work
in my district coaches got decent stipends but there was tremendous amount of extra time required for that...
the job that paid the best with the least amount of headache was head of the academic decathlon team...I think that gave a 4K stipend

many teachers who are good at their jobs and love the classroom HAVE to go into administration because that pays more--and if they are trying to support a family that is their option

check out the pay scales for ISDs in this are--and check what someone with 7 yrs exp or 17 yrs exp is getting paid
and then think how that would compare with someone who has a viable career in another professional field...
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Old 06-12-2010, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Lake Highlands (Dallas)
2,395 posts, read 7,607,050 times
Reputation: 1033
I'll just say this: many teachers go into teaching because they want to teach and accept that the pay isn't great. On the other hand, I know many people that would love to teach - and would be great at it - but won't go that route because of the pay.

We can't get rid of the bad teachers because there is already a teacher shortage. If the pay were higher, we'd attract a larger pool of teachers then we could get rid of the bad ones. And the good ones that don't care about pay would probably be very grateful for the increase in pay.

It's never going to happen, because teachers get paid from tax money - and the general US population feels we pay enough in taxes. But I stand by my statements which were formed by watching my dad's 30+ year career as a teacher and talking with him about the challenges of the field.

Brian
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Old 06-12-2010, 12:22 PM
 
4,304 posts, read 11,124,327 times
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Years ago I was a teacher for DISD. This was back when the district had a teaching shortage and was allowed in because of the alternative teaching program. My roomate at the time stocked grocery store shelves with Coke products and made more than I did. I really enjoyed the teaching side and really did not due it for the money. Poor excuses for parents and a administration that feared lawsuits is the reason I gave it up.
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Old 06-12-2010, 01:42 PM
 
1,491 posts, read 4,546,077 times
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"We can't get rid of the bad teachers because there is already a teacher shortage. If the pay were higher, we'd attract a larger pool of teachers then we could get rid of the bad ones."

Where in Texas is there a teacher shortage? Every district I know has a stack of apps on the desks begging for a job....all levels, all subjects. One tiny district near me announced an opening for a girls' basketball coach a couple of weeks ago - within a week they had 81 applications (and that district pays state minimum). There are similar situations at every district that I'm familiar with.
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Old 06-12-2010, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
563 posts, read 1,487,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GayleTX View Post
"We can't get rid of the bad teachers because there is already a teacher shortage. If the pay were higher, we'd attract a larger pool of teachers then we could get rid of the bad ones."

Where in Texas is there a teacher shortage? Every district I know has a stack of apps on the desks begging for a job....all levels, all subjects. One tiny district near me announced an opening for a girls' basketball coach a couple of weeks ago - within a week they had 81 applications (and that district pays state minimum). There are similar situations at every district that I'm familiar with.
Yep...right now the only shortage areas that persist are in bilingual education, and MAYBE secondary math and science. That's been my experience. All other subjects/areas are completely bombarded and there is definitely no longer a shortage.
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Old 06-12-2010, 03:48 PM
 
27,447 posts, read 44,947,050 times
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We can't get rid of the bad teachers because there is already a teacher shortage

again another media construct to make people THINK there is a shortage of teachers--nothing could be less accurate--all it does is give people incentive to go into an alt-cert course so that a company that gives that post college certification can make money--(big lobby when that bill was passed several years ago)...TX graduates enough teachers each year so that there is really no shortage when you consider the teachers returning to teaching or teachers moving in from out of state

-there is not even a shortage for Bilingual teachers or special ed teachers in well-paying, urban areas like the DFW metroplex...it is areas in smaller towns where the pay is only state minimum and there are less hiring opportunities if a teacher is married for the spouse...people don't want to teach there

the reason there are more science vacancies posted on secondary levels this year is because the state has mandated a 4 yr science credit requirement for college bound students starting the next session--that means some secondary schools are having to realign their science curriculum and hire science teachers at junior and senior highs... but that probably means only 1 or 2 teachers per school n a 4A school (if that) unless there are resignations/retirements)...
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Old 06-12-2010, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
563 posts, read 1,487,908 times
Reputation: 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by loves2read View Post
-there is not even a shortage for Bilingual teachers or special ed teachers in well-paying, urban areas like the DFW metroplex...it is areas in smaller towns where the pay is only state minimum and there are less hiring opportunities if a teacher is married for the spouse...people don't want to teach there
I don't know, I'd have to disagree with this one. DISD had positions open all year last year, throughout the school year. ONLY bilingual jobs though.
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Old 06-13-2010, 11:10 AM
 
Location: East Dallas
931 posts, read 1,744,125 times
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I don't think that teachers are paid enough and I also believe that if teachers were paid better the quality of teaching would go up significantly.
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Old 06-13-2010, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Purgatory (A.K.A. Dallas, Texas)
5,010 posts, read 12,808,501 times
Reputation: 2414
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete53FR View Post
I also believe that if teachers were paid better the quality of teaching would go up significantly.

Sure it would. Talent follow money. Always has, always will.

Teachers in Texas make decent starting money in the big cities ($45K - $48K), but 20 years in and you're only making $55K, whereas someone in other professional positions is making a ton more with half the experience...no wonder there enough really, really good teachers.
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