U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-09-2010, 10:29 PM
 
38 posts, read 140,962 times
Reputation: 24

Advertisements

It goes against the normal train of thought, but really, when you break it down to an hourly rate - teachers, at least in DISD, actually do pretty dang good for themselves.

I was doing some work at DFWSalaries.com and the average hourly rate for a teacher in DISD is about $34 per hour. Granted, a teacher only works about 1500 hours a year, rather than the typical 2080, but regardless, that some pretty good coin with the average annual salary being around 46K and a median salary around $50K.

Anyway - DISD is there now, so check it out - they are your tax dollars.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-09-2010, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Purgatory (A.K.A. Dallas, Texas)
5,010 posts, read 12,810,577 times
Reputation: 2414
Gee, this topic has never been covered before.

In short, they are woefully underpaid for the amount of work they put in. If you think the work ends when the bell rings, you are quite mistaken.

Other professional jobs that require as much work as a teacher puts in typically pay much, much higher.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2010, 05:46 AM
 
Location: North Texas
23,599 posts, read 31,143,716 times
Reputation: 26661
Quote:
Originally Posted by getmeoutofhere View Post
Gee, this topic has never been covered before.

In short, they are woefully underpaid for the amount of work they put in. If you think the work ends when the bell rings, you are quite mistaken.

Other professional jobs that require as much work as a teacher puts in typically pay much, much higher.
Teachers in the DISD probably do not make nearly enough given what they have to put up with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2010, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Lake Highlands (Dallas)
2,395 posts, read 7,607,989 times
Reputation: 1033
I know my teachers didn't get paid enough to put up with me when I was in HS.

Have to agree with getmeoutofhere - you can't calculate hourly rate based on just the number of school hours. 1500 hours would indicate having 3 months off and only working 40 hours/week otherwise. While teachers do get the summers off, they have continuing education, in house service days (no students), meetings after hours, homework that is often graded at home after dinner, etc. They may not put in 2080 hours. It's probably more like 1900-2000.

One other dimension: should we educate the next generation - which will run the offices, run our cities, etc - with the lowest bidder? I personally think teachers are WAY underrated and underpaid and under appreciated. Too many people think they're overpaid babysitters.

Brian
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2010, 07:11 AM
 
38 posts, read 140,962 times
Reputation: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by getmeoutofhere View Post

In short, they are woefully underpaid for the amount of work they put in. If you think the work ends when the bell rings, you are quite mistaken.
You could really make that argument about any job. Just because the clock hits 5:00, doesn't mean the work ends there. Plus there are an extra 3 months of working until 5:00. It may say a 2080 work year, but when I was consulting, it was more like 2500-2600 hours.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2010, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Purgatory (A.K.A. Dallas, Texas)
5,010 posts, read 12,810,577 times
Reputation: 2414
Quote:
Originally Posted by aryder09 View Post
You could really make that argument about any job. Just because the clock hits 5:00, doesn't mean the work ends there. Plus there are an extra 3 months of working until 5:00. It may say a 2080 work year, but when I was consulting, it was more like 2500-2600 hours.

Don't just take part of what I said out of context to support your argument -


Originally Posted by getmeoutofhere
Other professional jobs that require as much work as a teacher puts in typically pay much, much higher.


It's not the hours worked, it's the not getting paid for them. If we paid teachers like we paid other professional jobs, they would make somewhere around $100K.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2010, 10:04 AM
 
38 posts, read 140,962 times
Reputation: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by getmeoutofhere View Post
Don't just take part of what I said out of context to support your argument -


Originally Posted by getmeoutofhere
Other professional jobs that require as much work as a teacher puts in typically pay much, much higher.


It's not the hours worked, it's the not getting paid for them. If we paid teachers like we paid other professional jobs, they would make somewhere around $100K.
Broadly speaking, salaried jobs (i assume that's what you mean by professional) aren't paid for all of the hours that are worked. You shouldn't make the blanket statement that all teachers work OT and imply that other salaried professionals do not.

If you look at apples to apples, i.e. - hourly rate to hourly rate - teachers are paid surprisingly well. That's what I was stating originally.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2010, 11:57 AM
 
669 posts, read 1,338,454 times
Reputation: 1014
Soldiers put their life on the line for about half as much as starting teacher pay salary. Why don't they complain as much as teachers do?

Many other jobs have a similar starting pay as teachers, including some engineering jobs. Two married teachers make on average 100k. That is not too shabby.

I am a teacher and love the hours and the pay. Don't forget we get spring break, Christmas break and usually 5 personal days, in addition to summer break. We do have professional development, but so do many other jobs. A normal school day is 7 hours, including a 30 minute lunch and a 45 minute conference period. I don't know many teachers that use an extra hour every day, M-F, grading papers. Most cut out around 4 or earlier. Most of the complainers I see in teacher are elementary school teachers who just do teaching because they didn't have any other good option and think their job or being a housewife is the greatest thing humankind has ever seen.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2010, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Purgatory (A.K.A. Dallas, Texas)
5,010 posts, read 12,810,577 times
Reputation: 2414
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXRunner View Post
Soldiers put their life on the line for about half as much as starting teacher pay salary. Why don't they complain as much as teachers do?
Soldiers also have housing, clothing, and food provided for them. And it's rarely teachers that start these types of debates. It usually someone trying to justify the ridiculously low pay.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TXRunner View Post
Many other jobs have a similar starting pay as teachers, including some engineering jobs. Two married teachers make on average 100k. That is not too shabby.
Starting pay, sure. But it goes up quite a bit with experience. Teachers don't.


Quote:
Originally Posted by TXRunner View Post
I am a teacher and love the hours and the pay. Don't forget we get spring break, Christmas break and usually 5 personal days, in addition to summer break. We do have professional development, but so do many other jobs. A normal school day is 7 hours, including a 30 minute lunch and a 45 minute conference period. I don't know many teachers that use an extra hour every day, M-F, grading papers. Most cut out around 4 or earlier. Most of the complainers I see in teacher are elementary school teachers who just do teaching because they didn't have any other good option and think their job or being a housewife is the greatest thing humankind has ever seen.
If you're cutting out at 4:00 and not doing anything when you get home, you're cutting corners somewhere.

Every teacher I know spend a lot of time, outside the school day, grading, in extracurriculars, doing whatever needs to be done.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2010, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Lake Highlands (Dallas)
2,395 posts, read 7,607,989 times
Reputation: 1033
I personally think the biggest issue with teacher pay is that it's based on # years experience and education level. I guarantee not every teacher with 10 years experience + a masters degree are the same quality teacher. This system rewards the ****ty teachers and screws the good ones. There really needs to be some sort of pay for performance system put in place - not sure how that would work, but in theory it would encourage teachers to do the best job they can and maybe get rid of the bad ones.

Brian
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top