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Old 07-18-2010, 02:23 PM
 
136 posts, read 436,981 times
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Default Do you think of Dallas and Fort Worth as different metros or the same?

When I first moved to Dallas, having done a lot of research on the internet I just thought of the area as Dallas/Fort Worth, a huge 6 million person metropolitan area that was one.

Having lived there for awhile I think that is misleading and it confuses what Dallas and Fort Worth are in reality, which is 2 seperate metropolitan areas that happen to be fused together with a huge airport in the middle that technically does make them one from a geographic and development standpoint, but little else.

Dallas is 4.3 million people and feels like it, it's very cosmopolitan with lots of shopping and office buildings while Fort Worth is about 2 million and feels more like a San Antonio type city. I doubt people in FW visist Dallas proper very often or vise versa though the middle part is definitley shared.
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Old 07-18-2010, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Texas State Fair
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As a child, my family returned to the U.S. in the mid 50's, to Fort Worth for a couple of years, then west Texas. Fort Worth was my first american experience. Living in west Texas, I've always been aware that Dallas and Fort Worth were two distinct cities and very separate.

As for the DFW metro, I regard that as one place with dozens of local governments, including nearly a half dozen counties.
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Old 07-18-2010, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Austin
4,320 posts, read 7,926,712 times
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Dallas and Ft Worth are VERY different areas. Dallas is high-energy and fast-paced, whereas Ft Worth is relaxed and slow.

Ft Worth will never be like Dallas no matter how hard they try even with their revitalization of downtown to almost mimic Dallas'.
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Old 07-18-2010, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Grapevine, Texas
6,581 posts, read 10,464,280 times
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Fort Worth DOESN'T want to be Dallas! Fort Worth has its own charm! IMHO, Fort Worth's downtown is much better than Dallas' downtown. After dark, Fort Worth comes alive with Sundance Sqare, restaurants, clubs, etc. Dallas does have the pro sports, which Fort Worth will never have.

To answer the OP's question, I feel that the metroplex is two separate cities, which share highway infrastructure and an airport.
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Old 07-18-2010, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Lancaster, TX
1,221 posts, read 2,056,528 times
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Dallas and Fort Worth are distinct cities with their own individual identities. I don't feel that one is trying to be like the other. I view both cities as part of a single metropolitan area, however. Just look at the mid-cities. Grand Prairie (a suburb of Dallas) and Arlington (a suburb of Fort Worth) have grown together. The same is true in northeastern Tarrant and northwestern Dallas counties. A person driving from Dallas to Fort Worth on I-30 would see a continuous stretch of urban/suburban areas from one city to the other. If there was a low amount of commuter exchange between the two major counties, no DFW International Airport, and no large cities like Arlington, Irving, and Grand Prairie in between them, I think the position that there are two separate metropolitan areas would be more credible.

The Census Bureau recognizes separate areas of influence within some of the nation's largest metros as "metropolitan divisions." They have distinct characteristics, but are too closely tied to each other to be considered separate metropolitan areas.

Here is how it is applied to the DFW Metropolitan Area:
Dallas-Plano-Irving Metropolitan Division (2009 Estimated Population: 4,326,384)
-Collin County
-Dallas County
-Delta County
-Denton County
-Ellis County
-Hunt County
-Kaufman County
-Rockwall County

Fort Worth-Arlington Metropolitan Division (2009 Estimated Population: 2,121,231)
-Johnson County
-Parker County
-Tarrant County
-Wise County
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Old 07-18-2010, 10:50 PM
 
136 posts, read 436,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acntx View Post
Dallas and Fort Worth are distinct cities with their own individual identities. I don't feel that one is trying to be like the other. I view both cities as part of a single metropolitan area, however. Just look at the mid-cities. Grand Prairie (a suburb of Dallas) and Arlington (a suburb of Fort Worth) have grown together. The same is true in northeastern Tarrant and northwestern Dallas counties. A person driving from Dallas to Fort Worth on I-30 would see a continuous stretch of urban/suburban areas from one city to the other. If there was a low amount of commuter exchange between the two major counties, no DFW International Airport, and no large cities like Arlington, Irving, and Grand Prairie in between them, I think the position that there are two separate metropolitan areas would be more credible.

The Census Bureau recognizes separate areas of influence within some of the nation's largest metros as "metropolitan divisions." They have distinct characteristics, but are too closely tied to each other to be considered separate metropolitan areas.

Like I said, the middle part which includes Arlington, Grand Prarie and the area and cities around the airport is definitley shared, there is no disputing that and that is probably why the Census counts it as one metro area.

My point is that, if you live in the city of Dallas, are you visiting Fort Worth on any regular basis and vice versa, I know I didn't. I think to say DFW is one metro area really obfusicates what it is, which is sort of a San Antonio/Omaha type metro area in Fort Worth and sort of a Houston/Denver type city in Dallas, with a huge airport and some shared suburbs in between.
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Old 07-19-2010, 06:09 AM
 
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I am a native Dallasite and can count on 1 hand how may times I have been to Ft. Worth. I went to the zoo once, some concert when I was a teenager and...and...well, that's it.
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Old 07-19-2010, 06:12 AM
 
791 posts, read 1,127,551 times
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MSAs and CSAs are determined by commuting patterns, which are an excellent measure of influence. According to those statistics, people are visiting what you perceive as two different areas in huge numbers everyday. Not to mention the multi-nodal nature of the metroplex. One may live in Keller and work in Lewisville or Plano. One may live in Dallas and work in Arlington. This happens in huge numbers, and despite how you may perceive the cities of Dallas and Ft Worth and their differences, the truth is,~4million in this area live in suburbs that look and feel just like each other. Not to mention most people living in Dallas and Ft Worth proper, live in neighborhoods that are just like each other. In other words, its one. The parts of Dallas and Ft Worth that are different are their downtown areas, and those represent a tiny part of the metro.
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Old 07-19-2010, 07:15 AM
 
Location: 75025 (previously 75254, 90505, 90010, and 60614)
10,153 posts, read 10,489,897 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acntx View Post
Dallas and Fort Worth are distinct cities with their own individual identities. I don't feel that one is trying to be like the other. I view both cities as part of a single metropolitan area, however. Just look at the mid-cities. Grand Prairie (a suburb of Dallas) and Arlington (a suburb of Fort Worth) have grown together. The same is true in northeastern Tarrant and northwestern Dallas counties. A person driving from Dallas to Fort Worth on I-30 would see a continuous stretch of urban/suburban areas from one city to the other. If there was a low amount of commuter exchange between the two major counties, no DFW International Airport, and no large cities like Arlington, Irving, and Grand Prairie in between them, I think the position that there are two separate metropolitan areas would be more credible.

The Census Bureau recognizes separate areas of influence within some of the nation's largest metros as "metropolitan divisions." They have distinct characteristics, but are too closely tied to each other to be considered separate metropolitan areas.
Perfectly said.

I think the OP is thinking because Dallas and Fort Worth are very different cities in their personalities, they should be different metro areas. But the two cities economies are fused together way too much for them to be considered seperate. Ratanamo is also correct. MSA's and CSA's are measured by commuting paterns. Anything over 15% qualifies as an MSA. around 20% of Tarrant county residents commute to Dallas county. Convserly about 9% of Dallas county residents commute to Tarrant county. I believe most of these live in the mid-cities.

Bottom line is Dallas and Fort Worth are absolutely one metro area. They share the same economy, airport, TV and Radio stations, etc. The area is fused together even though Dallas and Fort Worth have different personalities.
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Old 07-23-2010, 07:17 AM
 
Location: DFW
41 posts, read 65,234 times
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Pretty much all roll into one, no real boundaries...So I would call it all one big cluster
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