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Old 09-07-2010, 11:08 PM
 
64 posts, read 208,660 times
Reputation: 34

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Probably it is new to me; for the month of August (30 days) I was charged nearly 2000 Kwh for just 1000 sq.ft apartment.

I did search this forum and found many users having 2000 to 2400 sq ft houses stated they had around 1700 Kwh per month.

I was very conservative in maintaining the unit at 78 degress while inside the apartment and 90 degrees during other times.

How can I make sure that all the 2000 Kwh is mine, basically is there a way to check that there is no fault with the meter or my usage is what being billed.

Thanks for your feedback.
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Old 09-08-2010, 04:34 AM
 
Location: Dallas
24 posts, read 111,167 times
Reputation: 28
I am eager to hear a response to this.

My wife had a similar experience with her electricity bill -- over $150 with a similar usage pattern as you.
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Old 09-08-2010, 04:49 AM
 
473 posts, read 1,119,302 times
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Energy bills, Water bills and Insurance in Texas are relatively higher than other states. Most Apartment complexes don't have good insulation/ vents /AC compared to homes. Without going into the details, $150 - $200 for a 1000 sq.ft apartment seems reasonable for a Texas Summer.
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Old 09-08-2010, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Forney Texas
2,110 posts, read 6,099,864 times
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my apartment is about $90 a month and I keep it at 74. Its 841 SF.
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Old 09-08-2010, 07:59 AM
 
1,631 posts, read 3,956,995 times
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My apartment is 800sq feet and has a garage on the ground floor, living room on the second and bedroom on the 3rd with attic space above. Our last bill was about $200. We installed a programmable thermostat and keep it around 76ish in the early evening and weekend when we're home and 80 when we're not home. We have terrible insulation, poor window and door seals as well. We have to use floor fans and a dehumidifier to circulate the air.

So I'm assuming that your apartment, like mine, is not too energy efficient. I am told that once we move into our new house, our electric bills should be cheaper. So that is comforting.
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Old 09-08-2010, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Austin
7,238 posts, read 20,334,141 times
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It will depend on if you're on the ground floor, middle being insulated by top and bottom, or the top with vaulted ceilings... However, leaving the place at 90 when you're not home is probably hurting you as it'll take more energy to cool the place off when you are there to bring it down to 78 rather than having it at 80-82 when you're not there.
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Old 09-08-2010, 08:24 AM
 
2,974 posts, read 8,954,154 times
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Apartments often have a certain electricty provider and you cannot switch; their rates are often very high.
We had an apartment in Houston - tiny 1 br and the elec bill was very close to our 3br house in Dallas. It was ridiculous!!
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Old 09-08-2010, 08:29 AM
 
64 posts, read 208,660 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adixyz View Post
$150 - $200 for a 1000 sq.ft apartment seems reasonable for a Texas Summer.
I used to pay around $35 dollars for 900 sq.ft apartment and less than $70 for 1600 sq.ft house in CA; $200 is way too much, what is more difficult is we did not get our things until middle of August and practically except for AC and fan we did not use anything in the apartment for first 2 weeks of that month.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveG99 View Post
my apartment is about $90 a month and I keep it at 74. Its 841 SF.
That looks a pretty good number compared to mine, thanks for sharing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Bungle View Post
My apartment is 800sq feet and has a garage on the ground floor, living room on the second and bedroom on the 3rd with attic space above. Our last bill was about $200.
Probably this unit is not well insulated ( I never bothered about that until now as we were in CA where most of us don't use AC for cooling, in fact most of the apartments don't have AC for cooling we only use to have heaters)

Quote:
Originally Posted by FalconheadWest View Post
leaving the place at 90 when you're not home is probably hurting you as it'll take more energy to cool the place off when you are there to bring it down to 78 rather than having it at 80-82 when you're not there.
I did go through some of the tips posted by the electricity company; i will try your suggestion too. Meantime I will browse though some more to find more energy saving tips but I strongly believe there is something wrong with the meter or the unit (with poor insulation or very old AC unit) which is causing the high energy use.
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Old 09-08-2010, 09:26 AM
 
1,631 posts, read 3,956,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newtothisplace View Post



Probably this unit is not well insulated ( I never bothered about that until now as we were in CA where most of us don't use AC for cooling, in fact most of the apartments don't have AC for cooling we only use to have heaters)
We were in CA too. We were 6 miles from the beach and just opened the windows on most days. I think in a year and a half we used the AC 5 times or so. But, we're not in Kansas(CA) anymore and things are different here. See if your complex will let you install a programmable thermostat. Our's did so long as we remove it when we leave.

I know that Costco also sells kilowatt monitors. I'm not exactly sure how they work, but it looks like you plug in your rates and then it shows you how much you're using and what it costs.
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Old 09-08-2010, 10:57 AM
 
112 posts, read 293,357 times
Reputation: 166
When I lived in an apartment in Richardson, (about 940 sq ft) my summer electricity bill was consistently over $200, and I was as careful as you are on the temps. I blamed it on my high ceilings and bad insulation. I did have an inner stairway that led from the attached garage, and I think I lost a lot of energy there. I moved into a 1400 sq ft home in April and my electricity bills are around $100 now. Go figure.
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