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Old 04-20-2011, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Garland, TX
81 posts, read 171,971 times
Reputation: 58

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Hi all, I was hoping some of you could provide some insight as to companies or resources that hire people with a criminal past. I am helping out a few family members who are considering moving with us to the DFW area and just trying to gather info. The web in general is a poor place to look for answers and was hoping our fellow forum members out there might know of someone who could help or is in this predicament personally.

Info I can provide in regards to this-
My brother in law has 2 felonies/ 2 misdemeanors all non violent and happened 7 years ago

My sister in law has one creditcard abuse felony from 1998.

Both of them have been working full time in a restaurant but my brother in law is hoping to find something that is more labor related. In Chicago, there aren't many opportunities for people with a past, which is sad.

I appreciate any and all help, please do not post on here with your opinions of how "criminals deserve this and that" as I've heard it all before. I am not looking for opinions, but looking for the right kind of assistance and referrals. Thank you all in advance! :-)
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Old 04-21-2011, 05:25 PM
 
441 posts, read 1,120,062 times
Reputation: 375
Might just have to talk to the folks doing the hiring.

When I was in a position to hire I hired three ex-cons. One turned out great, one turned out average, and I had to fire one. About the same ratio as anyone else.
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Old 04-21-2011, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Garland Texas
1,538 posts, read 4,729,846 times
Reputation: 583
To be honest, it can be very hard for people with felony convictions to get a job.
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Old 04-22-2011, 08:27 AM
 
250 posts, read 208,480 times
Reputation: 190
Its kind of unfortunate if you ask me. I think our society creates a cycle for criminals to re-offend since most employers, many who offer low end jobs like flipping burgers or pushing a mop, won't even talk to an ex-felon. Many criminals probably look forward to going back to jail, because at least there they get a bed to sleep on and a meal three times a day. I do that myself right now - I don't hire ex-cons for the liability aspect of it, though I do rent some properties to ex-cons. LOL! But again my business requires my employees / contractors to deal directly with customers and sometimes handle money (yikes), so that is something I can't do as it is currently structured without taking excessive business risk.

However I am trying to think of some way to create another business that would hire ex-cons. What? I don't know. But I think for a creative entrepreneur you could find some ex-cons who would be (a) very hard working & loyal and (b) not be too picky when it comes to benefits & compensation, because they just don't have alot of other options. I have a friend who has hired ex-cons to work in a grain / wheat processing faciity, and they actually can make great employees, and he pays them something like $10-12 an hour ... not much but they're still happy to have a paycheck. Obviously you'd need to be concerned about the liability aspect of it and you'd need to protect your business from inside theft ... but if you can get around those obstacles the sky is probably the limit.

A hand car wash? A manufacturing business of some sort? A construction business? A thrift store?

What do you guys think are good ideas???

... I always love looking for new ways to make money! LOL
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Old 04-22-2011, 08:43 AM
 
58 posts, read 103,983 times
Reputation: 48
I got these from a local message board:

Google "jobs for felons" or jobsforfelons1" and you will come up with some links.

Also try Goodwill Industries.
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Old 04-22-2011, 01:41 PM
 
56 posts, read 105,051 times
Reputation: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by dallas90210 View Post
Its kind of unfortunate if you ask me. I think our society creates a cycle for criminals to re-offend since most employers, many who offer low end jobs like flipping burgers or pushing a mop, won't even talk to an ex-felon. Many criminals probably look forward to going back to jail, because at least there they get a bed to sleep on and a meal three times a day. I do that myself right now - I don't hire ex-cons for the liability aspect of it, though I do rent some properties to ex-cons. LOL! But again my business requires my employees / contractors to deal directly with customers and sometimes handle money (yikes), so that is something I can't do as it is currently structured without taking excessive business risk.

However I am trying to think of some way to create another business that would hire ex-cons. What? I don't know. But I think for a creative entrepreneur you could find some ex-cons who would be (a) very hard working & loyal and (b) not be too picky when it comes to benefits & compensation, because they just don't have alot of other options. I have a friend who has hired ex-cons to work in a grain / wheat processing faciity, and they actually can make great employees, and he pays them something like $10-12 an hour ... not much but they're still happy to have a paycheck. Obviously you'd need to be concerned about the liability aspect of it and you'd need to protect your business from inside theft ... but if you can get around those obstacles the sky is probably the limit.

A hand car wash? A manufacturing business of some sort? A construction business? A thrift store?

What do you guys think are good ideas???

... I always love looking for new ways to make money! LOL
"Society" creates obstacles? No. You have a job that requires trusting an individual with a significant sum of cash. Logic informs you that placing men with serious criminal histories in that position is risky. It is not societal habits or tradition or unfounded bias, it is a logical judgement.

And you know while I hope the people the OP mentions can get work, it rubs me the wrong way when he glosses over felony convictions as "Having a past". You know I have a past also. Only in my past I went to school and worked hard and didn't commit felonies. Being convicted of a serious crime says something about you. It doesn't say everything. But it says something.
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Old 04-22-2011, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Grapevine, Texas
6,707 posts, read 10,840,069 times
Reputation: 3728
Even though I work in HR, since I am in healthcare, I cannot hire convicted felons (or even people with certain misdemeanors). I know it is very difficult for felons to find a job, especially females, and that is the reason that many of them reoffend.

Many manufacturing plants will hire convicted felons. Some of the plants don't even do a pre-employment background check. These are usually in the more dangerous industries where minors are not allowed to work, such as corrugated or forest products. Some trucking companies also hire convicted felons.

Texas Workforce's Project RIO helps recently released convicted felons find jobs. Goodwill Industries is also a good suggestion.
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Old 04-22-2011, 06:38 PM
 
2,277 posts, read 2,359,509 times
Reputation: 1463
Most places don't go back beyond 7-10 years for a background check so I would think if it were older than that you're in the clear.

Its too bad because people can change and put those things behind them altogether and become a better person. There are people that actually learn from their mistakes felon or not. At the same time, and employer has to cover all their bases and minimize their own risk as well. Some industries are more thorough about this than others, but I know in Healthcare most positions only have a 7 year look-back. Doesn't mean they can't go further though if there is a red flag.

I look back on my (young) life and I am happy I never got into serious trouble, but know of people who did who were just plain ol good people in the wrong place at the wrong time, or just made a bad choice-It happens. Sorry for your misfortune, and as cliche as it sounds, these things tend to work themselves out for the best.
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Old 04-23-2011, 07:52 AM
 
441 posts, read 1,120,062 times
Reputation: 375
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExcellentUserName View Post
"Society" creates obstacles? No. You have a job that requires trusting an individual with a significant sum of cash. Logic informs you that placing men with serious criminal histories in that position is risky. It is not societal habits or tradition or unfounded bias, it is a logical judgement.
Don't know why we would regard men to be especially risky in such a situation, but there are 2400+ felonies listed for Tx (http://goo.gl/2ZkZL - broken link), including failure to report a crime, several interesting oyster- and crawdad-related felonies, vagrancy, gay sex acts, "seduction of an adult", etc.

I do not think it follows that all cash handling jobs involve significant sums of cash, or that felons who have done their time are more likely, other things being equal, to steal cash from an employer.

I suspect our willingness to reject ex-cons and see them as permanently morally defective says more about us than it does about them. We would love it if they were different from us because that soothing thought suggests we upstanding folk could never fall on the wrong side of the law. Those People are different from us upstanding, God-f33ring types.

Gedanke: what, qualitatively, is the difference between the felony of driving while high on drugs (marijuana or alcohol for example) and non-felony driving while stupid, devoid of driving skill, and/or inattentive? The outcome is the same, but one is a felony and (according to the argument presented above) makes one an increased theft risk. IMO the charge should be "driving dangerously" regardless of the cause.
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:46 AM
Status: "Fleeing Texastan soon--perhaps for Illinois! :)" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Fort Worthless, Texastan
446 posts, read 341,304 times
Reputation: 401
Quote:
Originally Posted by dallas90210 View Post
Its kind of unfortunate if you ask me. I think our society creates a cycle for criminals to re-offend since most employers, many who offer low end jobs like flipping burgers or pushing a mop, won't even talk to an ex-felon. Many criminals probably look forward to going back to jail, because at least there they get a bed to sleep on and a meal three times a day. I do that myself right now - I don't hire ex-cons for the liability aspect of it, though I do rent some properties to ex-cons. LOL! But again my business requires my employees / contractors to deal directly with customers and sometimes handle money (yikes), so that is something I can't do as it is currently structured without taking excessive business risk.
Amen. So many people--a lot of which are also employers--act as if someone is an awful person just because they have (a) blemish(es) on their record. Sometimes, people are just caught in the wrong place at the wrong time, or make a big mistake they would not normally make, or something like that... and end up with a misdemeanor or felony on their record. That don't necessarily mean they are a bad person... but people act like it does mean that.

When no one will hire a felon, it only creates a barrier to them becoming a functional member of society, and encourages them to re-offend.
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