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Old 01-16-2012, 07:29 AM
 
11,672 posts, read 21,240,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by padcrasher View Post
I would also think Park Cities residents spend a larger share of their incomes on housing than they do in Southlake.
I don't agree with this. I think the avg Park Cities resident probably pays less as a huge % of residents have lived there for decades and bough their $1M (todays's dollars) homes for $30k or $100k or even $400k. Whereas Southlake is newer/ younger and the "average" residents bought at closer to today's values.

If you looked at recent first-time buyers into both markets, your theory may be more applicable.
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Old 01-16-2012, 11:10 AM
 
16,092 posts, read 35,784,302 times
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Old money types (not everyone in the PC area is a tear-down showboat type) tend to hide their incomes any way they can. Many are financially independent, not paycheck dependent. Also as in my area, many people do not have debt nor mortgages.
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Old 01-16-2012, 02:18 PM
hsw
 
2,144 posts, read 6,200,739 times
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99%+ of stats tend to be junk, esp income data from useless stuff like voluntarily self-reported "surveys"

Examine IRS tax return data

And, even there, most wealthy folks have lumpy reported incomes b/c so much is cap gains and business-derived, not W-2 income...and any truly wealthy guys pay taxes in a maximally efficient, fully legal manner, w/plenty of clever, highly-paid tax lawyers/accts who are far more efficient in finding loopholes in tax code (some of biggest tax shelters of modern era entail being an investor in a pro sports team...) than the morons who work at IRS or the community organizers in DC who come up with new taxes

Much BigMoney files taxes under various legal but complex structures, so zip code, etc data may be suspect in trying to ascribe income/wealth vs actual primary residence of tax filer...

For ex., many who sell a large business in a given yr (and face large cap gains taxes) may choose to legally become residents of TX or FL or NV for the relevant yr or so, to avoid the absurd taxes of welfare states like CA or NYC...all while keeping and enjoying their wkend house in Malibu/BH to avoid the nasty weather outside coastal CA...
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Old 01-17-2012, 12:21 AM
 
Location: Texas
5,774 posts, read 6,655,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
Yes, they do-->
"Any teacher who begins employment with HPISD without a Master's Degree shall be responsible for completing their degree within six years..."

Employment Opportunities (http://www.hpisd.org/hpisd/Personnel/EmploymentOpportunities.aspx - broken link)
That quote is for someone who is pursuing a Master's Degree, and stipulating how long the program can take to be completed. Ostensibly so the district pays for it. It's under their local personal development plans. It would be awesome if HPISD was requiring MA's.

Quote:
Q: What are the district guidelines for earning a Master’s degree?
A: A Master’s degree must be earned within six years of beginning employment with HPISD. A degree plan must be filed during the first year, and the degree must be in the teacher’s teaching field or an associated field in education.


Q: What assistance is available to help me finance the Master’s degree?
A: The campus PTA members generously award scholarships to selected teachers enrolled in Master’s degree programs. Each November, HPISD awards incremental stipends to teachers who have earned 9, 18 or 27 hours toward a Master’s degree.
Under their F.A.Q.'s section. According to HPISD's own review and improvement plan for 2010-2011 approved in Feb 2011 only 17% of teachers in the district have Master's degrees.

Last edited by txgolfer130; 01-17-2012 at 12:33 AM..
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Old 01-17-2012, 01:04 AM
 
1,256 posts, read 3,179,990 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txgolfer130 View Post
That quote is for someone who is pursuing a Master's Degree, and stipulating how long the program can take to be completed. Ostensibly so the district pays for it. It's under their local personal development plans. It would be awesome if HPISD was requiring MA's.

Under their F.A.Q.'s section. According to HPISD's own review and improvement plan for 2010-2011 approved in Feb 2011 only 17% of teachers in the district have Master's degrees.
So... Crew was right?
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Old 01-17-2012, 05:49 AM
 
11,672 posts, read 21,240,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txgolfer130 View Post
That quote is for someone who is pursuing a Master's Degree, and stipulating how long the program can take to be completed. Ostensibly so the district pays for it. It's under their local personal development plans. It would be awesome if HPISD was requiring MA's.

Under their F.A.Q.'s section. According to HPISD's own review and improvement plan for 2010-2011 approved in Feb 2011 only 17% of teachers in the district have Master's degrees.
If it's not required, it's "required" and principals are unwilling to hire anyone without a MA or in pursuit of one. Just read through the teacher bio's- it's more than clear how important the MA is as education is the very first thing mentioned by all of them. They are very clear about this in interviews (one of the first series of questions is the MA) and as a 30-something, all my friends working in the district have long-since earned MA's.

I would say the 17% degrees factor is more representative of most teacher's length of stay, in the district or in the teaching profession. At 6 years, most have either had babies and are staying home, moved out of the area or state (going "bam home" or following a husband's career, or possibl moving toanother district or a higher-paying district when the MA countdown runs out. I'm sure there are also "exempt" teachers who don't need a MA; perhaps PE teachers and other support-types.


Just in looking through the HPHS roster while answering this thread, very few of my own high school teachers are still there. Some were "old timers" who retired, but others were right out of college and didn't even last 5 years.
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Old 01-18-2012, 06:15 AM
 
13,180 posts, read 12,691,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
I don't agree with this. I think the avg Park Cities resident probably pays less as a huge % of residents have lived there for decades and bough their $1M (todays's dollars) homes for $30k or $100k or even $400k. Whereas Southlake is newer/ younger and the "average" residents bought at closer to today's values.

If you looked at recent first-time buyers into both markets, your theory may be more applicable.
Really? When the average 2009 home value in Southlake was $468K and in UP it was $881K? I see your point but I don't think it's enough to make up that huge a difference.
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Old 01-18-2012, 07:27 AM
 
2,206 posts, read 3,793,609 times
Reputation: 2073
1. People bought their home a long time ago and now are one passive income.
2. Kids inherited it.
3. Passive income and capital gains may occur as "liquidity events" like EDS said.
4. Kids help parents pay property tax and are waiting for right time to sell.
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Old 01-18-2012, 08:28 AM
 
93 posts, read 203,872 times
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It is kind of sad that in probably the best district in the state, only 17% have advanced degrees. If you look at the salary schedules, teachers only receive $2,500 additional per year for a masters degree in HPISD. In some districts, it is only $1,000. Public schools in Texas do not sufficiently reward advanced degrees.

I went to a mediocre high school in Illinois in terms of test scores (the average ACT is 21, which is near the state average). I looked at the district profile and 89% of the teachers there hold masters degrees. If the elementary schools were included, this might be somewhat lower (many districts in Illinois have separate districts for elementary and high school). Still, even if it were 50%, it would be three times the rate of the best district in Texas. I like a lot of things about living in Texas, but the value the state places on public education is not one of them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
If it's not required, it's "required" and principals are unwilling to hire anyone without a MA or in pursuit of one. Just read through the teacher bio's- it's more than clear how important the MA is as education is the very first thing mentioned by all of them. They are very clear about this in interviews (one of the first series of questions is the MA) and as a 30-something, all my friends working in the district have long-since earned MA's.

I would say the 17% degrees factor is more representative of most teacher's length of stay, in the district or in the teaching profession. At 6 years, most have either had babies and are staying home, moved out of the area or state (going "bam home" or following a husband's career, or possibl moving toanother district or a higher-paying district when the MA countdown runs out. I'm sure there are also "exempt" teachers who don't need a MA; perhaps PE teachers and other support-types.


Just in looking through the HPHS roster while answering this thread, very few of my own high school teachers are still there. Some were "old timers" who retired, but others were right out of college and didn't even last 5 years.
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Old 01-18-2012, 08:46 AM
 
2,695 posts, read 3,600,830 times
Reputation: 1555
Quote:
Originally Posted by jelf View Post
It is kind of sad that in probably the best district in the state, only 17% have advanced degrees. If you look at the salary schedules, teachers only receive $2,500 additional per year for a masters degree in HPISD. In some districts, it is only $1,000. Public schools in Texas do not sufficiently reward advanced degrees.

I went to a mediocre high school in Illinois in terms of test scores (the average ACT is 21, which is near the state average). I looked at the district profile and 89% of the teachers there hold masters degrees. If the elementary schools were included, this might be somewhat lower (many districts in Illinois have separate districts for elementary and high school). Still, even if it were 50%, it would be three times the rate of the best district in Texas. I like a lot of things about living in Texas, but the value the state places on public education is not one of them.
On the outside it may seem sad. But even at elite prep schools the teachers may not even be certified, much less hold a masters in education or anything else for that matter. As a former substitute teacher, I didn't need anything more than my bachelor's to teach. And with just my bachelor's degree I was able to easily comprehend and teach high school biology, physics and english.

A master's degree alone doesn't correlate with better teaching.

Also HPISD is well-known not to be a high-pay district for teachers, mostly because it doesn't have to be.
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