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Old 01-18-2012, 09:02 AM
 
93 posts, read 203,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyDay View Post
On the outside it may seem sad. But even at elite prep schools the teachers may not even be certified, much less hold a masters in education or anything else for that matter. As a former substitute teacher, I didn't need anything more than my bachelor's to teach. And with just my bachelor's degree I was able to easily comprehend and teach high school biology, physics and english.

A master's degree alone doesn't correlate with better teaching.

Also HPISD is well-known not to be a high-pay district for teachers, mostly because it doesn't have to be.

I agree with all of your points. Most of my family members are teachers in the Chicago area. The advanced degrees they hold are not particularly rigorous; they are pretty much BS like many graduate degrees (including one of the ones I hold). However, I think widespread graduate education improves the overall level of teacher quality and helps average teachers more than it does the stellar ones.

I'm not sure that I have seen a high-pay district in Texas; they seem to be pretty similar to one another in DFW. They pay relatively high (45-50k) starting salaries and then they inch up from there. That is probably why there aren't as many experienced teachers here. If you know that after 30 years of teaching you will be making 60k instead of 100+, you are much more likely to do something else, whether that means staying at home or trying another field.
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Old 01-18-2012, 09:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by padcrasher View Post
Really? When the average 2009 home value in Southlake was $468K and in UP it was $881K? I see your point but I don't think it's enough to make up that huge a difference.
It goes back to.... what % of Southlake buyers purchased in the last 10-15 years vs what % of Park Cities buyers did?

I do think the "average" Park Cities owner pays a smaller % of income towards their Park Cities housing than the average Southlake owner. So many of my friends' parents still live in the Park Cities. Their mortgages are totally paid off so their ownly home expenses are taxes & insurance, maybe $10-30k per year? Then you have all the grandparents still in the district who have parts of their property taxes "frozen" AND mortgages paid off who are paying even less than the "empty nester" stage couples.

I would also think a larger number of Park Cities families live in paid off homes- whether they (or a trust) paid cash at purchase or they've been there 20 or 30 years and have paid off the mortgage - than in Southlake.

Just my speculations based on being a 3rd generation Parkie
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Old 01-18-2012, 10:01 AM
 
11,671 posts, read 21,231,508 times
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Originally Posted by GreyDay View Post
Also HPISD is well-known not to be a high-pay district for teachers, mostly because it doesn't have to be.
HPISD actually used to be one of the highest paying districts in the state. Then Robin Hood came along and it's just unstustainable with 70% of property taxes going to the state for redistribution and only 30% left for the district to operate & staff.

The Mad for Plaid fundraiser pays for a portion of teacher salaries each year ($2-3K, I think). Without that, HPISD pay would be even lower.
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Old 01-18-2012, 03:16 PM
 
2,206 posts, read 3,792,030 times
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For elementary, I do not see the need for an advanced degree.

I would expect teachers of technical subjects at 7th grade or better to have specific undergrad degrees in those subjects or real close, ie math, physics, chemistry, history, and language, i.e. English.

Unfortunately, in many districts you have teachers with teaching degrees muddling through Geometry or US History and as a result, the kids arrive at college unprepared.

Furthermore, I would expect that the capstone courses, ie AP calc and AP humanities would be taught be teachers with MS or PHD in the particular subject. But, again, this is not the case.

Part of the problem is that there are highly qualified technical people with advanced degrees who would teach these capstone courses very well, but they would not slog through getting a credential, nor get have the patience to get the seniority, nor would many large urban school districts welcome them as they would not put up with the BS.

So, in short, I am more interested in the subject their degree is in as a BA in math is far more preferable to a PHD in education if the teacher will be teaching Geometry or Calc. In fact, the former is far better to teach any Physics, Math, or Chemistry class.
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Old 01-18-2012, 03:40 PM
 
59 posts, read 129,077 times
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Originally Posted by TX75007 View Post

Part of the problem is that there are highly qualified technical people with advanced degrees who would teach these capstone courses very well, but they would not slog through getting a credential...
Interesting point. I have often thought how funny it is that I am qualified to teach University classes (and have taught several.) But, not qualified to teach high school.

I realize this is off-topic, sorry guys!
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Old 01-18-2012, 05:13 PM
 
Location: la hacienda
2,259 posts, read 8,629,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
HPISD actually used to be one of the highest paying districts in the state. Then Robin Hood came along and it's just unstustainable with 70% of property taxes going to the state for redistribution and only 30% left for the district to operate & staff.

The Mad for Plaid fundraiser pays for a portion of teacher salaries each year ($2-3K, I think). Without that, HPISD pay would be even lower.
They also depend on donations like this to help cover costs, the first one mentions Mad For Plaid:

HPISD Gifts: January Edition

HPISD trustees waved in more than half a million dollars in gifts at last night’s board meeting. Here’s the rundown:
- $350,000 from the Highland Park Education Foundation. This final pledge from Mad for Plaid will go toward teacher salaries.
- $75,000 from the University Park PTA to support staff salaries.
- $41,700 from the Highland Park Sports Club for improvements to Scotland Yard. Included are new signs bearing the names of two famous alumni — Clayton Kershaw and Chris Young — above the left field (at $6,000 for the pair).
- $41,544 also from the University Park PTA, for staff development, training, and travel; technology/technology supplies and computer training; and instructional supplies.
- $18,051 from the Park Cities Asian American Families. The money will buy iPads and a cart.
- $10,000 from IBM for technology-based projects, given in honor of volunteer Bruce Lin.
- $10,000 from Sam and Cheryl Wyly, for unspecified use.
- Another $6,380 from the HP Sports Club, in the form of an in-kind donation of soccer balls for HPHS girls soccer teams.
- A $349 Xerox machine from parent Joan Wilk, for the HPHS volleyball team

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Read more: Park Cities People Park Cities People
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Old 01-19-2012, 08:27 AM
 
2,206 posts, read 3,792,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern1979 View Post
Interesting point. I have often thought how funny it is that I am qualified to teach University classes (and have taught several.) But, not qualified to teach high school.

I realize this is off-topic, sorry guys!
Same here. I was a TA for three years in both Math and Linguistics at UT but it would take a year of classes for me to teach at the HS level.

A friend retired from industry at 45 and then decided to teach HS math (she has an MS in math and an MBA ) but it took a year to get her credentials. She is a phenomenal teacher. She gets the top students beginning with Geometry and carries them through to AP Calc/Stats.

Another has an MFA, spent years overseas teaching English in the EU in a private HS, and they still made her take a year of classes to teach AP English/History here in North Texas. She loves the subject and just holds her classes' attention every day.
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Old 01-19-2012, 08:29 AM
 
2,206 posts, read 3,792,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
HPISD actually used to be one of the highest paying districts in the state. Then Robin Hood came along and it's just unstustainable with 70% of property taxes going to the state for redistribution and only 30% left for the district to operate & staff.

The Mad for Plaid fundraiser pays for a portion of teacher salaries each year ($2-3K, I think). Without that, HPISD pay would be even lower.
Bingo. This is why property taxes are so high in the best districts.

Plano parents should note that their taxes would drop 40% if Robin Hood went away.

Much of the taxes going to rural districts does not go for education, but for sports programs and new buildings and administrative salaries.

Google "robin hood texas abuses" to get a feel for what is going on.
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Old 01-19-2012, 04:43 PM
 
11,671 posts, read 21,231,508 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TX75007 View Post
Bingo. This is why property taxes are so high in the best districts.

Plano parents should note that their taxes would drop 40% if Robin Hood went away.

Much of the taxes going to rural districts does not go for education, but for sports programs and new buildings and administrative salaries.

Google "robin hood texas abuses" to get a feel for what is going on.
Actually, HPISD's taxes are among the lowest in DFW @ 2-2.1% even though 70% of the school district portion is recaptured by Robin Hood. The bill may be large due to home values, but the actual tax rate is very low.

Still, without the evil Robin Hood, HPISD taxes would probably be in the 1.2-1.5% range.
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Old 01-19-2012, 07:05 PM
 
1,256 posts, read 3,178,921 times
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When was robin hood instituted and are there any potential changes to the legislation in the near future?
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