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Old 01-23-2012, 02:11 AM
 
1,165 posts, read 2,009,489 times
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Just came across this....

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/27/us/27ttdallas.html


Thoughts? Solutions?
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Old 01-23-2012, 04:30 AM
 
1,256 posts, read 3,188,137 times
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I have 2 thoughts.

1. The article did not talk about whats going on in the DFW area - I bet the numbers are significant.
2. Dallas is a tough market to break into for certain professions. It is saturated (which means that no one really leaves). For example, let's take the medical profession (physicians). I found that Dallas was a tougher market to break into. Austin and Houston had an abundance openings available, while Dallas was the exact opposite. This difficulty of job prospects (relatively) is probably another reason why the jump has not been that significant for Dallas City and County.
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Old 01-23-2012, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
543 posts, read 1,184,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinipig523 View Post
I have 2 thoughts.

1. The article did not talk about whats going on in the DFW area - I bet the numbers are significant.
2. Dallas is a tough market to break into for certain professions. It is saturated (which means that no one really leaves). For example, let's take the medical profession (physicians). I found that Dallas was a tougher market to break into. Austin and Houston had an abundance openings available, while Dallas was the exact opposite. This difficulty of job prospects (relatively) is probably another reason why the jump has not been that significant for Dallas City and County.
Really depends on your specialty. My wife has been contacted multiple times from Dallas hospitals/groups (and she hasn't even started Fellowship yet) but Austin is much more saturated. I think that for most specialties and especially as a PCP Austin is far harder to break into. From what we've been told you have to work much harder to find a position in Austin and if you set up a private practice you better plan on it taking a lot longer to fill than it would in Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, or Fort Worth. From what we hear Houston is roughly as easy to find a job in as Dallas is for her particular specialty (Fort Worth and San Antonio are easier).
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Old 01-23-2012, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Southlake. Don't judge me.
2,812 posts, read 3,581,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CREW747 View Post
Just came across this....

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/27/us/27ttdallas.html


Thoughts? Solutions?
My immediate thought is "who cares about the CITY population? The key number is the MSA population!" (IOW, the city and surrounding 'burbs).

Many cities are "built out". The growth in the Metroplex overall has been tremendous (~25% over the past decade, I could check the census numbers again to get the exact figure but it's in that range, so why bother?). I'm sure the growth of the city of Dallas is a big deal to the mayor, but for most of us, even if we're working in Dallas itself we're likely living in one of the big ol' burbs around it.
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Old 01-23-2012, 08:45 AM
 
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I wonder if either of the reporters of that piece are Dallas residents
Dallas has done couple of things right--
DART and its growth to the suburbs is spot on for keeping Dallas a viable entity IMO-- as someone who lives in Tarrant county where the bus for senior citizens is about the only public transit I see--and who knows that plenty of people probably would use public trasit IF it went where they needed to go--which it does not...

It is the ratio of income groups that you need to watch and support--
a city that takes in growing numbers of working poor is going to have hard time sustaining itself and attracting high-income people on various levels that pay more property tax, sales tax, support (supposedly) programs to sustain the city -- like raising taxes to pay for parks, police/fire services, schools...

Case in point:
Arlington has been losing higher-income, higher-educated demographics for decades--
the city is in decline because the ones moving in are often working poor and often immigrants (legal and non) who tend to USE city services w/o really helping to replinish/improve them...
25 years ago Arlington was much more viable/desireable as a "bedroom" community to Dallas--
I don't think that is still the case--the ISD's reputation has dropped, the neighborhoods aren't as alluring and they are aging, the industries that supported the middle/upper income residents have faded w/o ones to replace them...

Dallas has always been supported by a close ring of suburbs that have offered positive alternatives when residents did not want the city proper--most of them are managing to stay viable although they are aging and seeing their luster siphoned off to ones that are newer and more distant...
but that is because the industry/business to sustain residents there has also shifted into the other ring...
Frisco and Plano especially are growing not just neighborhoods but businesses---so that it is much easier for people who want to live outside Dallas and the inner ring can find jobs that pay well (80K+) so they don't have to commute that far...

One reason for westward movement into Tarrant county and Tarrant moving west into areas like Aledo and Weatherford is available land--
Dallas does not really have that option and has turned to renewal projects--to reinventing itself...
Just like initial projects--some of those will work and some won't...
Dallas itself needs to be conscious of what losing the presence of AA at DFW will do to the city--
AA is huge presence in this area and if it is taken over by airline co with ties to other city--like Chicago--DFW as a whole will suffer
Love can't substitute for DFW--so losing strong AA presence there is not necessarily a boon to Dallas
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Old 01-23-2012, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
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I wonder why they choose to single Dallas out. The same trend is evident in many US cities. Atlanta and Los Angeles for example.
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Old 01-23-2012, 10:47 AM
 
27,611 posts, read 45,144,048 times
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looking at the article there is disclaimer that it came from The Texas Tribune--
my take
just filler for the out of local area news
Rick Perry has put TX in the news with his run for the Republican primary and claims about how TX is such a great model of what legislators did right
so maybe this is sort of swipe at Perry that all is not golden in TX

and when I read it my first thought was "so what"-
nothing in there was news to me--and has not really been news for past 5 years or so
anyone who lived in DFW knows that population push is going out from Dallas proper
Dallas has been landlocked for decades and there are all sorts of reasons why population density is going north and west
so I think that info is NEWS only to people who are not familair with DFW, other metro areas, and the state--
ergo--New Yorkers....
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Old 01-23-2012, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
1,807 posts, read 2,103,888 times
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Seems to me he touched on the "solution" in the article: start building up, instead of out.

Of course, since the health of a region is based more on, well, the region, the fact that Dallas' growth hasn't been all the explosive isn't that worrying. I'd rather we spent our efforts densifying downtown and near-downtown areas, making them livable areas.
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Old 01-23-2012, 10:50 AM
 
2,279 posts, read 3,923,454 times
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Same trend everywhere..If it were ok to post the link I could post an identical article from Boston dot com about Boston. I would imagine most CT cities are faring alot worse than Boston and Dallas combined since that state is mess. I hear they are about to lose UT and other very important companies are looking to bounce as well.

I don't think this should pump any of the suburbanites spirits btw, the burbs need Dallas more than it needs you. Places like Boston and NYC have a little more "staying" power in this category due to geographical differences, not land locked, densities, weather etc. It makes sense people would move around a newer metro area and away from it-natural course of growth if you ask me. Like anywhere and a problem that Dallisites here on these boards haven't discussed ad-nauseum.

Last edited by skids929; 01-23-2012 at 11:02 AM..
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Old 01-23-2012, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
5,681 posts, read 9,697,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justme02 View Post
I wonder why they choose to single Dallas out. The same trend is evident in many US cities. Atlanta and Los Angeles for example.
Probably even WORSE in Atlanta, specifically.
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