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Old 03-03-2012, 07:17 AM
 
2,279 posts, read 3,914,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
I disagree about a newer home being automatically more energy efficient. They may have more insulation and newer systems, but you can upgrade an older house's insulation and systems. You can put in new windows in an old house, as I did. Also, you're not factoring in one really obvious advantage of an older home...they tend to be "closer in", which can greatly reduce your gas usage. Also, urban sprawl is not really a good thing. At least not to me.
Older homes usually have older trees too, which I really like and add to energy savings..I think however he is referring to radiant barrier as well, which is a pain to retrofit in a older home. And even a retrofit isn't the same as the material they use in newer homes with it infused on the roof decking. Also, newer more efficient A/C units make a HUGE diff.

I agree with you on the closer in part.
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Old 03-03-2012, 08:39 AM
 
Location: North Texas
23,607 posts, read 31,169,837 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skids929 View Post
Older homes usually have older trees too, which I really like and add to energy savings..I think however he is referring to radiant barrier as well, which is a pain to retrofit in a older home. And even a retrofit isn't the same as the material they use in newer homes with it infused on the roof decking. Also, newer more efficient A/C units make a HUGE diff.

I agree with you on the closer in part.
An older home can sometimes have a newer A/C unit than a newer home does. And even if the newer home has a brand new one it's usually a crappy builder-grade one whereas the older home may have one with a better SEER rating.

A radiant barrier is not THAT much of a pain to install in an attic. Someone with pretty basic tools and who isn't totally lazy (or too fat to fit into tight spots in the attic) can usually knock it out on a weekend.
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Old 03-03-2012, 09:16 AM
 
Location: plano
5,955 posts, read 7,500,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
An older home can sometimes have a newer A/C unit than a newer home does. And even if the newer home has a brand new one it's usually a crappy builder-grade one whereas the older home may have one with a better SEER rating.

A radiant barrier is not THAT much of a pain to install in an attic. Someone with pretty basic tools and who isn't totally lazy (or too fat to fit into tight spots in the attic) can usually knock it out on a weekend.
Newer homes have more windows and higher ceilings than older homes. Nice design elements but tough on energy efficiency. I like the bells and whistles available in custom homes built in the past 5-12 years. Crown molding, base boards, study paneling, door moldings, etc seem more prevalent than on new builds. These features cost a lot to put in new but with the housing bubble colapse these high end features come at a better price in 5-12 year old homes.
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Old 03-03-2012, 06:20 PM
 
Location: North Texas
23,607 posts, read 31,169,837 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
Newer homes have more windows and higher ceilings than older homes. Nice design elements but tough on energy efficiency. I like the bells and whistles available in custom homes built in the past 5-12 years. Crown molding, base boards, study paneling, door moldings, etc seem more prevalent than on new builds. These features cost a lot to put in new but with the housing bubble colapse these high end features come at a better price in 5-12 year old homes.
You could always add those in an older home, and the bonus is that you get to choose them. Also...every room in my house has baseboards except the bathrooms (which are tiled over 100% of the floor and 3/4 of the way up the walls).
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Old 03-03-2012, 06:23 PM
 
1,005 posts, read 3,308,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
These features cost a lot to put in new but with the housing bubble colapse these high end features come at a better price in 5-12 year old homes.
Which is funny because even extremely intricate molding is cheap compared to expensive items in a house, like high end appliances. But then it's probably a very high margin item when purchased from a builder.
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Old 03-03-2012, 06:33 PM
 
Location: plano
5,955 posts, read 7,500,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by galore View Post
Which is funny because even extremely intricate molding is cheap compared to expensive items in a house, like high end appliances. But then it's probably a very high margin item when purchased from a builder.
Helps if you install your self but if you pay to have it installed labor costs continue to be high in my experience.
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Old 03-04-2012, 04:35 PM
 
384 posts, read 597,408 times
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I have seen several homes in Dallas, Allen, and Keller that were built between 1998 and 2005. The build quality was pretty much appalling.

Builder grade everything and zero efforts at insulation, situation, and general QC issues.

A friend of mine just sold his 4000 sq ft 'dream house' in Keller. It was more of the same. To an amateur it looks fantastic. Cathedral ceilings downstairs, 'custom' this and that, and so forth. The thing is a total mess in terms of engineering and plumbing and comes with quite outrageous power, gas and water bills.

But it'll impress your friends.

Bottom line - be very careful. The best built houses I've seen around here are pre-90s. There are good ones from the 90s and beyond but they were probably specced by an architect and not bought off plan.

During the boom people got a little bit crazy and bought their 'dream home' from a builder who sold them a line. Many of these people are now coming to regret that.
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