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Old 03-06-2013, 09:08 AM
 
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What is this test you all are talking about?
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Old 03-06-2013, 09:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RenaInTexas View Post
Just to add, for future searchers who are interested in the process:

the Pre-K and 1st grade tests are ridiculously easy. They asked my pre-k'er to count to 10...he can count to 100. The gave my 1st grader analogies and asked him to write his ABC's (both of which he does regularly). No reading, no math problems, no writing sentences....all of which he can do.

My hypothesis is that the test is easy so that they have a lot of kids score high. This way they can easily pick and choose who gets in based on additional things like demographics. Technically, the top 30% automatically gets in regardless of demographics (location). So that is the top 9 of 30 students get an automatic seat. However, they make the test SO easy, that at least 30 students will get a max score. Thus..they can pick and choose who gets to come. They pick the remaining 70% from each of the learning areas in the district...this gives them demographic diversity.

So in the end; its almost a lottery. It's a tilted lottery (as the above poster hinted at); a high score from South Oak Cliff probably has a better chance of getting in than a high score from North Dallas. But the evaluation process (for Pre-K and 1st) is so easy that it is effectively a lottery.
Actual merit isn't much of a player in these circumstances.
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Old 03-06-2013, 11:30 AM
 
2,206 posts, read 3,792,801 times
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Originally Posted by LyraM View Post
What is this test you all are talking about?
Sounds like the ITBS for K/1st from the comments. Not sure about Pre-K - maybe the Bracken?
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Old 03-06-2013, 02:42 PM
 
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[quote=eulavoss1104;28537934] As it should be, they give kids who score average or slightly above average on the assessment but are in lower income areas and probably minorities the priority because they have very few other good options - 10k per year for private school or moving to Lakewood or Stonewall areas is not something they can just decide to do.

Can you explain to me your comment "as it should be" they gave lower performing kids priority. Why is that "how it should be"?

Is it your position that UCLA and Cal should admit white kids with lower scores to ensure diversity? (otherwise it might have too many asians)

Should MIT discriminate against Indian students in favor of latino students? (sorry, too many Indian kids kicked butt on the SATs and AP exams, lets admit dumber white kids).

Should UT Law Review ignore how students did in their first year of law school and just sprinkle in some minorities? (Between 1960-2000 UT law review never had an African American student). My brother in law graduated from UT Law and thought it was hypocritical that the law school had different standards for admission, but the law review did not. I don't know if any african american students have been admitted to the law review post 2000- he graduated.

Should John Hopkins Medical School make an effort to accept lower performing white males compared to women and minorities? (hey, the white guy has it too hard- lets lower the standard for him...)

I guess I am just old fashioned that I think all parties should be on equal footing and that a person's race should not be a factor. I really don't like different standards based on economics, but that is at least justifiable.
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LyraM View Post
What is this test you all are talking about?
A portion of the evaluation is an on-site assessment. One Saturday during Jan/Feb, you take your kid to the school and they go into the classroom with other kids and the teacher --- a part of the assessment is to determine if the kids are comfortable leaving their parents. While in the room they do various activities to assess their skills.

For Pre-K, they write their name, count, do color and shape recognition, and my son said they did a puzzle, but I am not sure what type. A few more simple things like this. This is no secret, if you go to the open house, they will tell you most of how the kids will be tested. He was back there about 30 minutes.

The 1st grade assessment covered writing their ABCs, some analogy type questions (NNAT I think), at open house they said they would do a reading and sentence writing assessment, but my son said they didn't do that. He was back there an hour though.

The older grades do an actual test and/or essay. Not sure what kind, but the students all had several pencils. DISDs website gives a vague description of how the older grades are tested.

I think the older grades are tested more rigorously than PreK - 1st.
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Old 03-07-2013, 08:50 PM
 
2,206 posts, read 3,792,801 times
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Originally Posted by HockDad View Post

I guess I am just old fashioned that I think all parties should be on equal footing and that a person's race should not be a factor. I really don't like different standards based on economics, but that is at least justifiable.
As a matter of fact, most universities still try to admit students whose academic credentials are not on par with the rest of the student body. This is a long but well reasoned and solidly supported article on just this fact that looks at just one ethnic group.

The Myth of American Meritocracy | The American Conservative
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Old 03-18-2013, 09:31 AM
 
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It's my understanding that it's not only merit, but as a DISD school, the magnet must accept a certain percentage of students from every learning community (DISD is divided geographically into several (maybe 6 or 7?) "learning communities"). Because Dealey is located in the North Dallas neighborhood of Preston Hollow, there are more kids from that area applying to the school. Therefore, the closer you live to the school, the competition is higher. If you live in Lakewood or Oak Cliff, you are probably more likely to get in because fewer kids apply from those neighborhoods. At least that's what the admissions counselor told me a few years ago, and that seems to be accurate based upon the people I know whose kids have been admitted vs waitlisted.

My daughter applied for 1st grade and is #7 on the waitlist. Not sure whether she'll get in. I've been told the first 10 "might" get in. Would love to know if anyone else has had experience with this.
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Old 03-18-2013, 10:54 AM
 
743 posts, read 1,062,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jojo73 View Post
It's my understanding that it's not only merit, but as a DISD school, the magnet must accept a certain percentage of students from every learning community (DISD is divided geographically into several (maybe 6 or 7?) "learning communities"). Because Dealey is located in the North Dallas neighborhood of Preston Hollow, there are more kids from that area applying to the school. Therefore, the closer you live to the school, the competition is higher. If you live in Lakewood or Oak Cliff, you are probably more likely to get in because fewer kids apply from those neighborhoods. At least that's what the admissions counselor told me a few years ago, and that seems to be accurate based upon the people I know whose kids have been admitted vs waitlisted.

My daughter applied for 1st grade and is #7 on the waitlist. Not sure whether she'll get in. I've been told the first 10 "might" get in. Would love to know if anyone else has had experience with this.
This is correct (except for the assumption Lakewood parents don't apply). Slots for city-wide magnets are distributed equally to each region, with a set aside for "at-large". I believe there is also a minimum cutoff.

This is the way it will always be done. It was part of the desegregation order.
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Old 03-19-2013, 07:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Considering Coming Back View Post
This is correct (except for the assumption Lakewood parents don't apply). Slots for city-wide magnets are distributed equally to each region, with a set aside for "at-large". I believe there is also a minimum cutoff.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Considering Coming Back View Post

This is the way it will always be done. It was part of the desegregation order.


Well, if I lived in DISD, and sent my kids to that school, I would be none to happy about a system that intentionally discriminates against Asian kids in favor of other lower scoring minorities in the name of diversity.

Buy hey, if I lived in Highland Park, I would also not be happy that a HP grad in the 11% won't get admission to UT, even with great SAT scores and activities, but that a grad from Woodrow or Hillcrest in the top 9% receives automatic admission with a low SAT score and no activities.

I guess I just hate discrimination and am opposed to almost all of the systems that the government and courts have used in the last 15 years to "remedy" past actions.
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Old 03-19-2013, 07:54 AM
 
743 posts, read 1,062,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HockDad View Post

Well, if I lived in DISD, and sent my kids to that school, I would be none to happy about a system that intentionally discriminates against Asian kids in favor of other lower scoring minorities in the name of diversity.

Buy hey, if I lived in Highland Park, I would also not be happy that a HP grad in the 11% won't get admission to UT, even with great SAT scores and activities, but that a grad from Woodrow or Hillcrest in the top 9% receives automatic admission with a low SAT score and no activities.

I guess I just hate discrimination and am opposed to almost all of the systems that the government and courts have used in the last 15 years to "remedy" past actions.
Dealey isn't a TAG school, it's a Montessori. The school doesn't exist as to be a meritocratic filter. The test is to ensure the applicant can do the work, not to secure admission. It's an "alternative" learning environment. It is not the place for your paleo-conservative rants on race.
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