U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-05-2012, 10:09 AM
 
4 posts, read 6,178 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

Folks, how bad is the water shortage situation really in DFW? I am seeing that few areas in Allen and Plano have the Stage 3 warning for water usage. If this gets worse (say, not much rainfall in the next few months and really strong summer) how will this affect the property prices, especially on new home market in the suburbs. Would you recommend someone buying property now, or wait to see how bad the summer really gets this year..

- nsrk
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-05-2012, 10:34 AM
 
Location: plano
5,955 posts, read 7,495,565 times
Reputation: 5012
Quote:
Originally Posted by nsrk View Post
Folks, how bad is the water shortage situation really in DFW? I am seeing that few areas in Allen and Plano have the Stage 3 warning for water usage. If this gets worse (say, not much rainfall in the next few months and really strong summer) how will this affect the property prices, especially on new home market in the suburbs. Would you recommend someone buying property now, or wait to see how bad the summer really gets this year..

- nsrk
As the greenie say, we have climate change now so it will cycle back to more rain at some point. But in the long run DFW cities need more water han mother nature gives this area. Cities like Irving and Dallas who are working on long term solutions with Oklahoma will fair better than others who dont plan ahead and act. Collin county cities will end up buying water from Irving or Dallas at a high rate which will be noticeable in the long run. I wouldnt wait to buy now over water worries today but consider the long term ris when chosing where to buy is prudent, even though I didnt do so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2012, 11:23 AM
 
7,283 posts, read 8,120,225 times
Reputation: 5375
Presently there is no real water shortage around here. We have a long term water shortage against likely population growth, however. Most all local water restrictions are attempts to manage prices the smaller cities pay as their rates are tied to high usage years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2012, 01:26 PM
 
Location: plano
5,955 posts, read 7,495,565 times
Reputation: 5012
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Presently there is no real water shortage around here. We have a long term water shortage against likely population growth, however. Most all local water restrictions are attempts to manage prices the smaller cities pay as their rates are tied to high usage years.
The levels of lake lavone resulting in restrictions on watering a lawn in Plano sure seem like a real water shortage. We planted new plants after uying our home in late 2010 and lost many plants after the head and reducted water schedule last summer. My water / sewage bills in Plano ran double my Houston bills even with restrictions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2012, 01:56 PM
 
653 posts, read 698,009 times
Reputation: 408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
The levels of lake lavone resulting in restrictions on watering a lawn in Plano sure seem like a real water shortage. We planted new plants after uying our home in late 2010 and lost many plants after the head and reducted water schedule last summer. My water / sewage bills in Plano ran double my Houston bills even with restrictions.
Are these restrictions and higher bills true for all of the Dallas Metroplex, or just areas outside of Dallas proper?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2012, 02:58 PM
 
Location: plano
5,955 posts, read 7,495,565 times
Reputation: 5012
Quote:
Originally Posted by dclamb3 View Post
Are these restrictions and higher bills true for all of the Dallas Metroplex, or just areas outside of Dallas proper?
The restrictions I mentioned apply to Plano. Dallas is no longer on restrictions as I recall. We had a heavy couple of rainy days that refilled the reservoirs which feed Dallas. Irving too is on less restriction than Plano. I understood that most of Collin county did not have future water lined up to meet growth rates. In fact one Irving Source told me Collin country was restricting new building permits, which I find hard to beleive given new builds still going on although at a slow rate in this economy.

Irving and Dallas have addressed long term water needs in deals with Oklahoma (SE part) which has a lot of water surplus to their needs. However these deals are tangled up in the courts as state of Oklahoma doesnt want water going to Tx and the Indian Tribes also have claims on the water as well. But both IRving and Dallas have deals in motion even though it may take 10 years to sort out. With water you have to address sources well in advance of the need.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2012, 05:20 PM
 
Location: East Dallas
931 posts, read 1,744,440 times
Reputation: 634
Dallas has adequate supplies but there are politicians trying to grab it. Some of the suburbs are in dire states as they have always bought at cheap rates.

Don't get me wrong Dallas needs to repair its existing pipeline or delivery system
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2012, 05:33 PM
 
Location: plano
5,955 posts, read 7,495,565 times
Reputation: 5012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete53FR View Post
Dallas has adequate supplies but there are politicians trying to grab it. Some of the suburbs are in dire states as they have always bought at cheap rates.

Don't get me wrong Dallas needs to repair its existing pipeline or delivery system
An article in the dallas business journal last october is not as confident as you seem to be. Collin county is hurting due to zebra mussels in Texoma which has hurt supplies, making it look to other authorities to supply water at least in the short term.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2012, 05:57 PM
 
7,283 posts, read 8,120,225 times
Reputation: 5375
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
The levels of lake lavone resulting in restrictions on watering a lawn in Plano sure seem like a real water shortage. We planted new plants after uying our home in late 2010 and lost many plants after the head and reducted water schedule last summer. My water / sewage bills in Plano ran double my Houston bills even with restrictions.
Lavon and is low. Lewisville is more or less full. I was there Saturday.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2012, 06:57 PM
 
2,206 posts, read 3,793,609 times
Reputation: 2073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
The levels of lake lavone resulting in restrictions on watering a lawn in Plano sure seem like a real water shortage. We planted new plants after uying our home in late 2010 and lost many plants after the head and reducted water schedule last summer. My water / sewage bills in Plano ran double my Houston bills even with restrictions.
LOL. Lake Lavon is a puny lake compared to the others in the system that feed into Dallas.

Lake Texoma is cut off until they decide what to do about the Zebra Mussel.

The lakes have come up 5-6 feet and one more hard rain will fill them up. And the forecast is for just such an occurrence.

So we will be fine in the short term - 10-20 years. And there are some new lakes on the books.

But, something to keep in mind is that there are plants in East Texas which are desert plants. There is a reason they are there. it was far drier not too long ago - probably 1700s and earlier.

There are a number of land management strategies Texas can employ to increase both runoff and ground water recharge. It will probably entail paying landowners in the watersheds. At some point, Texas will have no choice but to do so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top