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Old 04-26-2012, 09:01 AM
 
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I was just wondering, if someone wanted to have a farm/ranch, where do people usually develop them? Is there a place that is very easy to commute to Richardson area? Are they normally in at least partially developed areas?
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Old 04-26-2012, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Dallas area, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mayflowers4me View Post
I was just wondering, if someone wanted to have a farm/ranch, where do people usually develop them?
Most undeveloped land in the DFW area is already farm/ranch land. They are where there are no cities and subdivisions and development.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mayflowers4me View Post
Is there a place that is very easy to commute to Richardson area?
Richardson is surrounded by other cities. You would probably have to go beyond the suburbs to find open & affordable land to farm or ranch. Beyond Rockwall or Wylie or north of McKinney. From what I've heard, Fannin and Grayson County are much more affordable than land in any of Collin County.

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Originally Posted by mayflowers4me View Post
Are they normally in at least partially developed areas?
There are ranches and farms near smaller towns and communities in rural areas, like Farmersville and Blue Ridge and even Wylie in Collin County.

The Haggards in the center of Plano recently sold off much of their farm land for housing development. There is a dairy near Collin College, but it has been there for years. Parker has some farming, but some lots there to build a house cost $200,000 per acre.

For farming and ranching, the return per acre is usually not enough to make it worthwhile to purchase land near well developed areas.

I don't know if that really tells you what you want to know. I would say look at land available to buy and what it costs and then find out what farmers and ranchers make per year. My dad did a little farming when he retired. Even 30 years ago, he went to Fannin County to find the land that he could afford.
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Old 04-26-2012, 10:06 AM
 
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Thank you so much for your reply. I was just thinking to have a little farm for the kids, kind of just for us. It wouldn't be any time soon. It's kind of a childhood fantasy that both my husband and I share. I know the kids would love it too.
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Old 04-26-2012, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Dallas area, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mayflowers4me View Post
Thank you so much for your reply. I was just thinking to have a little farm for the kids, kind of just for us. It wouldn't be any time soon. It's kind of a childhood fantasy that both my husband and I share. I know the kids would love it too.
That kind of farm is much more doable.

If you are wanting just a large garden plot and a few chickens, then an acre or so would do you and that is more reasonably priced nearer to Richardson. If you want horses and cows, then they require more land and many cities are zoning them out of their city limits. So, you would need to do a little research there.

I know that there are ranch estate lots in East Plano and Murphy (with older homes), and Parker I think has only 1 acre minimum sized lots.

Good Luck on your farm. Enjoy all of that fresh produce and eggs.
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Old 04-26-2012, 05:21 PM
 
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The problem is that most of the terrible traffic is up north and you would have to get through that to get back and forth to a farm. My family has had a cabin at Lake Texoma for decades but it's very difficult to get there compared to days past. Sometimes the traffic is pretty bad even outside rush hours --

Maybe if you went towards the east or east/northeast - Fannin County has indeed been popular for this sort of thing. The last time I went to visit relatives up there it took about an hour from Richardson during the middle of the day.

I hate to sound condescending but sometimes people from outside Texas think much of it is rural (cowboy hats and horses). We have almost seven million in the Metroplex and are the fourth largest urban area in the USA.

For a weekend place, it could work - I know people who do that - usually though they have caretakers on the farm/ranch. Or they just call it a farm and the land is fallow.
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Old 04-26-2012, 05:41 PM
 
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Driving on the PGBT between I30 and Firewheel, you'll see horses and cows from the road. Saches/Rowlett area I guess and not too far from Richardson. But, I can't imagine the land is cheap. We have quite a few "personal farms" in Sunnyvale at 3-5 acres. HS kids entering the Ft. Worth Stock show for chickens, goats, etc. The commute to Richardson isn't great, but there are folks that take the PGBT to Plano every day. And with the extension of the PGBT through Sunnyvale in the next 5-10 years I would be wary of purchasing anything near any of the proposed paths. So, basically, it's doable, but pricey and you won't have a 'short' commute.
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Old 04-27-2012, 09:02 AM
 
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Actually there are very few true farms or ranches near Dallas. You may see a few head of cattle or some horses on someone's "hobby farm", mainly to get the ag exempt status for taxes. And sometimes people will plant a crop making it a true farm. But most open vacant land tracts in the suburbs and in nearby rural areas are just that - open vacant land either producing hay (for the exemption), or scrub and fire ants (no exemption). The latter use is much more prevalent.
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Old 04-27-2012, 08:38 PM
 
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Most of the rural land in the Metroplex is owned by investors and they typically pay someone to farm it so it stays in ag exemption. Much of the land in the surrounding counties is owned by REITS, too. Most of the "farmers" who do this are full time farmers and are professionals.

The average duration of city people in the country is about 5 years. They get tired of the drive, the idiots, and the cost and time of it, and move back in.

If you want some space, then either get a hunting lease or buy a lot for your house that has some room for a garden. Another thought is to be a hand for a local farmer.

Having said all that, my best investment was to buy a lot of land when I was young and the price was low. Given the droughts in TX, unless you are really big, farming will lose you money 3 years out of 5. When it does not rain for six months, that "dream" is a nightmare.
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Old 04-28-2012, 08:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TX75007 View Post

The average duration of city people in the country is about 5 years. They get tired of the drive, the idiots, and the cost and time of it, and move back in.
Cynical but probably true.

Cue the Music for Green Acres . . .

Green Acres is the place to be,
Farm living is the life for me . . .

Quote:

Having said all that, my best investment was to buy a lot of land when I was young and the price was low. Given the droughts in TX, unless you are really big, farming will lose you money 3 years out of 5. When it does not rain for six months, that "dream" is a nightmare.
Site they are looking for needs water.
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Old 04-28-2012, 10:39 PM
 
105 posts, read 147,414 times
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Thank you everyone for your help and replies, much appreciated.
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