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Old 06-13-2016, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,889 posts, read 9,584,447 times
Reputation: 5303

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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
That wasn't what I meant. When the entire culture of the neighborhood is about children, those without are unwelcome. When there is diversity (I mean people of different backgrounds, interests, and stages in life - including families with children as well as all the other variants), then most people can find a niche.
Okay, that makes sense. Thought you didn't want any kids around lol.


Maybe I am out of the loop since I just graduated the last of the herd from high school, but I've never been in an area where it was so monolithic with school kids. The 12 years of schooling go buy pretty fast, so no neighborhood is ever in a perpetual state of being all about school kids.

 
Old 06-13-2016, 09:28 PM
 
860 posts, read 559,750 times
Reputation: 1457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymous Lurker View Post
I assume this your personal opinion and not based on anything you can post here as proof.

I personally know several people who live in Preston Hollow who outright own their homes (paid in full or paid off) and have little to no debt and have 6 figure incomes. What debt they carry is easy for them to pay off if they wanted to (car payments / leases) and while their property taxes are high they are justified by the property values of their homes.
It's not an opinion - it's a fact, but you don't even seem to understand what I wrote. Wealthy people have the most assets (to a degree that people focusing on income inequality seem to overlook net asset inequality), but they also have the most debt. Their homes and cars are more expensive so why shouldn't they? It is simply a lower percentage of their income than people who are in the $25-50k income bracket so it is significantly more manageable. Yes, some people own their homes outright, but lots of people would rather tie up less capital in a house and put it into better yielding investments. There's nothing inherently bad about debt, but being irresponsible with it can have disastrous effects.

The Federal Reserve and Census Bureau publish this information. Look it up.
 
Old 06-14-2016, 03:00 AM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
8,855 posts, read 10,310,313 times
Reputation: 9266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
Okay, that makes sense. Thought you didn't want any kids around lol.


Maybe I am out of the loop since I just graduated the last of the herd from high school, but I've never been in an area where it was so monolithic with school kids. The 12 years of schooling go buy pretty fast, so no neighborhood is ever in a perpetual state of being all about school kids.
It does go by fast! But there are (currently) areas in some suburbs where neighbors are all in their late 20s, 30s, maybe early 40s with kids. And all geared towards kids. My husband loves newer housing, not my cup of tea. We were visiting some folks at a party in a neighborhood in The Colony, my guess the builds were from the late 90s through 2000s. We are very early 50s and felt so old! Since hubby likes newer houses I asked him if he would like to live there. He admitted that he felt out of place and would probably not care to live in that specific neighborhood.
 
Old 06-14-2016, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,889 posts, read 9,584,447 times
Reputation: 5303
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXNGL View Post
It does go by fast! But there are (currently) areas in some suburbs where neighbors are all in their late 20s, 30s, maybe early 40s with kids. And all geared towards kids. My husband loves newer housing, not my cup of tea. We were visiting some folks at a party in a neighborhood in The Colony, my guess the builds were from the late 90s through 2000s. We are very early 50s and felt so old! Since hubby likes newer houses I asked him if he would like to live there. He admitted that he felt out of place and would probably not care to live in that specific neighborhood.
Maybe it's because I've always been drawn to more mature neighborhoods where the original owners that remain are empty nesters and there is a more varied mix. I have never cared for brand new. I like a little character in my neighborhood and architecture.
 
Old 06-21-2016, 11:27 PM
 
859 posts, read 480,126 times
Reputation: 845
I like Frisco....if I had kids in school, that's exactly where I would be I think.
Great schools, great amenities, nice new school buildings, nice new homes.
Minor league baseball with an occasional big league player, home of the Cowboys and the Stars.
Home of Dallas soccer.
Plenty of shopping and stores.
Fairly diverse ethnically, but probably tight range economically.
It is a little HOAy as someone mentioned, and the houses tend to look alike with similar amenities.
No water features to speak of....Lake Lewisville is close though.
Not so many trees.
The city is probably too big to be home town friendly now.
If you have to drive to work it might be far....but hopefully you could work in Frisco, McKinney, or Plano
Overall clean, nice, new city if you like that.
No public transportation if you like that.
 
Old 08-23-2018, 06:33 PM
 
1 posts, read 388 times
Reputation: 10
I think everyone here pointed out very interesting and true facts... except for the person that claimed that Frisco has "too many white people". Haha I'm sorry, but have you ever been to Frisco?

Anyways, I've lived here for 17 years and finally moved north to a smaller town. I never liked Frisco. I guess compared to the town I live in now, I admit that Frisco is very convenient for both visitors and the people that live there. Restaurants on every corner, variety of stores to shop at, multi-cultured, more neighborhoods being built- it's very eye catching to those who come from small towns. Some poster mentioned Frisco not having adequate schools, and I have to disagree with that. I've attended Frisco schools from kindergarten up until junior year of high school, and they really give kids a chance to really shine. They offer handfuls of AP courses, a huge variety of STEM classes, and the teachers get to create their own curriculum (and I know this because my sister used to teach at Frisco ISD). The only downside to that is that your kid has a lot of competition in terms of class rank and such.

Anyhow, back to my point about not liking Frisco- I was excited to move out of there. I think the thing that really bothered me- and bothers A LOT of people about Frisco in particular- are the people. I guess you could expect such from a city that houses a fair portion of the upper middle class, but people there are seriously snobby and stuck up. I know that there's people like that everywhere, but Frisco is a giant magnet when it comes to those kinds of people.

I like to think of Frisco as a mini Dallas. Everything there is fast paced and the city keeps growing and growing. I wouldn't recommend anyone to move to Frisco- unless they like the appeal of what it offers. But to me, what it offer's was never worth it.
 
Old 08-23-2018, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Texas
209 posts, read 69,814 times
Reputation: 219
The entire city of Frisco is hemmed in by tolls roads. It's not very accessible for people of low socio-economic class.
 
Old 08-23-2018, 07:34 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
1,843 posts, read 814,183 times
Reputation: 2278
There are lots of things I don't really like about Frisco.

From an architectural/ design standpoint it basically has some city issues such as traffic and small lots with all the suburban issues such as: not practically walk-able in any meaningful way, cookie cutter, HOAs, far away from the city core, and non existent public transit.

If I don't want a big yard I want to be able to walk to at least some of my daily chores, a bar etc. You aren't going to be doing that in Frisco.

On the other hand, if I'm going to have to drive most places, I at least want a yard larger than my house to plant a garden and mature trees on the property.

As it stands, as suburban as Irving is, it's still an older more fine grained (from a zoning standpoint) that I can still walk to a couple of restaurants cvs etc. While still having a decent sized yard. It's alot harder to do that in Frisco.

Oh and also I hate the faux new urbanism "Frisco Square" It's just a glorified outdoor mall.
 
Old 08-23-2018, 08:02 PM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
12,895 posts, read 18,402,938 times
Reputation: 6593
Who hates Frisco?

I barely even think about it... I've only been there ONCE.
 
Old 08-23-2018, 09:48 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
1,843 posts, read 814,183 times
Reputation: 2278
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
Who hates Frisco?

I barely even think about it... I've only been there ONCE.
I mean there are stuff to go see there, the Star for one, and FC Dallas games are a ton of fun, but it's a paint to get up there, I'm mostly only up there for work.
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