U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-04-2013, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
13 posts, read 15,674 times
Reputation: 25

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by mSooner View Post
All right, let's make this clear: There is no one place in the DFW area that is less or more likely to be hit by a tornado. It's science folks. Hills, trees, buildings, rivers, lakes, indian burial grounds, and enchanted forests don't make a damn difference.
I don't fully agree with this. There is scientific evidence that the heat island effect of a large metropolitan area produces slightly more stability in these areas. In particular, in DFW, there is somewhat more stability in the NE part of the city, closer to downtown, because the winds typically from from the SW to the NE. As mentioned by a previous poster. And this is based on some of my own research as a scientist, not by what I googled online. When you see the large storms approaching Dallas (or other large metropolitan areas), it is reasonably common for them to lose some steam just around downtown or where the heat-island effect is maximal (NE of downtown in our case). It is just because there is a micro-climate around a large metropolitan center, and the higher temps usually mean higher stability. But of course, if the storm system is big enough, all bets are off.

It may not make a big difference, but it likely makes some small difference.

But the SW/NE effect is probably emphasized by the fact that the meeting point of warm humid air and colder dry air is typically north or west of Dallas..........
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-04-2013, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
1,074 posts, read 1,157,568 times
Reputation: 1270
You are much more likely to get damage from strong winds and hail that accompany our spring storms than a tornado. A couple of weekends ago we got pea sized hail with one of the storms that came through. The storm wasn’t even that strong. Last year we got decent sized hail that beat up our wood fence so bad that we had to get it re-stained. It left thousands of little white marks where it took the stain off. Some of our neighbors lost their fences too.

We always park our cars in the garage and we both have garages at work, so we didn’t have to worry about getting the cars repaired. But big hail can total a car. Prosper got hit bad a year or two ago with huge hail and several friends lots windows in their house and had their older cars totaled due to the damage.

We’ve been in our house about 3.5 years and I can think of 1, maybe 2 times that we’ve had to get in our closet under out stairs. The meteorologist was saying there was rotation in our area, but no tornado on the ground yet. So we got in there just to be safe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2013, 11:57 AM
 
3,166 posts, read 4,814,727 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
It may not make a big difference, but it likely makes some small difference.
I get what you are saying, but consider your audience (the OP). Someone really shouldn't be making a decision on where to live based of one person's scientific research that conflicts with the general meteorological consensus on the issue. And if you are on the right track, any storm that forms NE of the city doesn't fit in this logic at all.

I'm not a meteorologist, I freely admit that. I only studied it a little in college and follow severe weather as a hobby. However, those that do study this support and make my point. That link isn't just some random googling--it is the FAQs page for the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, OK, arguably the authority on tornadoes and tornado damage.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2013, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and wherever planes fly
1,408 posts, read 2,221,059 times
Reputation: 1226
So there havent been any really really strong ones in a while then it seems? or they have just hit very sparsely populated areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2013, 04:58 PM
 
16,092 posts, read 35,784,302 times
Reputation: 6264
They were pretty good when Kyle Rote, Jr. was playing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2013, 05:20 PM
 
Location: plano
5,953 posts, read 7,492,992 times
Reputation: 5012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taynxtlvl View Post
So there havent been any really really strong ones in a while then it seems? or they have just hit very sparsely populated areas.
That is the way they roll, always. Dont panic stay calm and make sure it is coming your way then take appropriate action
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2013, 08:24 PM
 
3,166 posts, read 4,814,727 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
So there havent been any really really strong ones in a while then it seems? or they have just hit very sparsely populated areas.
It's really just a crapshoot. People have been killed by tornadoes in Indiana, Colorado, etc. If anything, being in a weather-wise area makes you that much safer. Just be aware and you'll be fine. You cant predict what will happen based on what has happened in the past...at least with severe weather. For example, Coppell was hit by a major hail storm 2 years in a row. That does not make the chances of another one hitting this year any greater or smaller than they would have been otherwise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2013, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Blah
4,153 posts, read 7,646,575 times
Reputation: 3053
Quote:
Originally Posted by unherdable View Post
I don't fully agree with this. There is scientific evidence that the heat island effect of a large metropolitan area produces slightly more stability in these areas. In particular, in DFW, there is somewhat more stability in the NE part of the city, closer to downtown, because the winds typically from from the SW to the NE. As mentioned by a previous poster. And this is based on some of my own research as a scientist, not by what I googled online. When you see the large storms approaching Dallas (or other large metropolitan areas), it is reasonably common for them to lose some steam just around downtown or where the heat-island effect is maximal (NE of downtown in our case). It is just because there is a micro-climate around a large metropolitan center, and the higher temps usually mean higher stability. But of course, if the storm system is big enough, all bets are off.

It may not make a big difference, but it likely makes some small difference.

But the SW/NE effect is probably emphasized by the fact that the meeting point of warm humid air and colder dry air is typically north or west of Dallas..........
Is this why some lessor storms tend to move NE or SE as they approach the area? I like to monitor the weather radar in my spare time as storms develop and have noticed countless times where a storm on a direct path with the city ends up diverting NE or SE about 10-30 miles out. It just seems like the only storms that makes it past that mark, are storms of significant size, either by large mass (takin up a large area) or more intense.

Anyhow, we primarly live downtown and I'm not a Scientist by any means although Sceince was my strong subject in school and have taken several Geology classes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2013, 04:46 PM
BCB
 
1,006 posts, read 1,351,793 times
Reputation: 631
Oh, they're pretty bad...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2013, 04:51 PM
 
297 posts, read 406,842 times
Reputation: 323
Duck!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top