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Old 07-26-2013, 09:28 AM
 
7,324 posts, read 8,171,512 times
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Yea boy. Those Californians have always been perfect citizens. How about the hired gangs of thugs and knuckle busters who tried to keep those fleeing The Dust Bowl out of California.
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Old 07-26-2013, 09:29 AM
 
7,324 posts, read 8,171,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZonaZoo View Post
Let's keep it in perspective here: forty years ago, Texas was an incredibly backwards place. That's a no-brainer. Thankfully, things have changed for the better.

Why do you think so many people opted for California instead of Texas back then?
Generalize and stereotype much? Good grief.
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:21 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,466 posts, read 3,560,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZonaZoo View Post
If you observe demographic trends from 1850-1990, most people were moving to California, not Texas. I'm convinced the backwardness of Texas had something to do with it.

Let's face it: Texas has only recently became a popular relocation spot, mostly because it's major cities seemed to be faring the recession significantly better than most other major cities across the U.S. Before that, though, Texas wasn't really on anyone's radar. For many decades, most professionals looking to escape the Northeast, Midwest, and South moved to California. Most immigrants opted for California as well because of it's reputation as a more opening, inviting, accepting place. Now, some of those folks who moved to California decades ago when it was booming, have relocated to Texas in the past five or so years.
Wrong.

Here are some numbers for you to look through....

Texas Population and Components of Change -- Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University Home
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:45 AM
 
301 posts, read 401,378 times
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I will balance the discussion by saying I do remember good cops too. When I turned 18 they changed the liquor law to allow liquor sales to those 18 and up. The thinking was if you can die for your country you should have all rights that go with being an adult. A 17 year old friend of mine asked me to buy some liquor for him and I agreed. He drove his brother's car and was unlicensed, and liability insurance wasn't required at the time. On our way back home on I-20 near Lancaster Road, he decided to see how fast that little pink mustang could run, and before long there were police lights behind us. My friend panicked and demanded I throw my open container of beer out of the car. I did, and of course the office saw it. He pulled up out of the car and summed up the situation. He didn't call for backup and during those times officers had a lot of discretion about how they handled a call.

There were three of us and I was the oldest. He proceeded to tell us what he could run us in for. My friend - speeding and no license...and as for me - littering and contributing to the diliquency of minors. He then said, I'm going to tell you a story, I know you don't want to listen to it but you're going to anyway. " He proceeded to tell us about decisions and consequences wrapped in the background of his own youthful experiences. Lastly he told us, "if I ever catch you pushing this mustang like that again I'll run you in." Suddenly his face relaxed. He said, " Now go park this car on the side of your house, drink your beer and have fun."

We couldn't believe it, and in the context of the times this was nothing short of a miracle. Other cops would have easily has us pinned to squad cars with the lights from 3 or 4 cars blaring in the background. I never forgot that officer, and never made that mistake again. I do not have a record today and he is the reason why I don't. He didn't profile us, he simply saw three teenagers who made a mistake. What I would give today to thank him personally.
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:24 PM
 
Location: San Antonio Texas
11,435 posts, read 15,984,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ablebodied View Post
I will balance the discussion by saying I do remember good cops too. When I turned 18 they changed the liquor law to allow liquor sales to those 18 and up. The thinking was if you can die for your country you should have all rights that go with being an adult. A 17 year old friend of mine asked me to buy some liquor for him and I agreed. He drove his brother's car and was unlicensed, and liability insurance wasn't required at the time. On our way back home on I-20 near Lancaster Road, he decided to see how fast that little pink mustang could run, and before long there were police lights behind us. My friend panicked and demanded I throw my open container of beer out of the car. I did, and of course the office saw it. He pulled up out of the car and summed up the situation. He didn't call for backup and during those times officers had a lot of discretion about how they handled a call.

There were three of us and I was the oldest. He proceeded to tell us what he could run us in for. My friend - speeding and no license...and as for me - littering and contributing to the diliquency of minors. He then said, I'm going to tell you a story, I know you don't want to listen to it but you're going to anyway. " He proceeded to tell us about decisions and consequences wrapped in the background of his own youthful experiences. Lastly he told us, "if I ever catch you pushing this mustang like that again I'll run you in." Suddenly his face relaxed. He said, " Now go park this car on the side of your house, drink your beer and have fun."

We couldn't believe it, and in the context of the times this was nothing short of a miracle. Other cops would have easily has us pinned to squad cars with the lights from 3 or 4 cars blaring in the background. I never forgot that officer, and never made that mistake again. I do not have a record today and he is the reason why I don't. He didn't profile us, he simply saw three teenagers who made a mistake. What I would give today to thank him personally.
That is a great story!! I see why you have remembered it all of these years. Most of us never have had a good opinion of texas redneck cops that seemed to make up the majority in the past.
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:37 PM
 
Location: San Antonio Texas
11,435 posts, read 15,984,530 times
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Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Generalize and stereotype much? Good grief.
I don't think that it's a stretch to say that if you were a minority in Texas. I was talking with an 80 year old mex-american woman in Lennox, Calif the other day. She said that her husband was a sub-contractor in Corpus Christi, Tex in the 1950s. The general contractor would first have a meeting with the local white Anglo contractors to parcel out the work. After that, the mex-americans were called in. The answer was always that there was "no more work available". He gave it all to the Anglos. The couple decided that they had enough of Texas. So Calif was not perfect either, but more tolerable than Texas. The husband was able to get work in so Cal, whereas he could not in So Texas. She said that they put in a bid to buy a home in the "new" community of Westminster, Calif, but were turned down because the owner "didn't want to sell to Mexicans". Then they put another bid for a home in the "new" community of Woodland Hills, Calif. Again, the developer did not want to sell to "mexicans". They finally moved to Redondo Bch. The couple became wildly successful in real estate and raised their children well, most likely wouldn't have happened in Texas.
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Old 07-26-2013, 11:36 PM
 
7,324 posts, read 8,171,512 times
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Originally Posted by wehotex View Post
I don't think that it's a stretch to say that if you were a minority in Texas. I was talking with an 80 year old mex-american woman in Lennox, Calif the other day. She said that her husband was a sub-contractor in Corpus Christi, Tex in the 1950s. The general contractor would first have a meeting with the local white Anglo contractors to parcel out the work. After that, the mex-americans were called in. The answer was always that there was "no more work available". He gave it all to the Anglos. The couple decided that they had enough of Texas. So Calif was not perfect either, but more tolerable than Texas. The husband was able to get work in so Cal, whereas he could not in So Texas. She said that they put in a bid to buy a home in the "new" community of Westminster, Calif, but were turned down because the owner "didn't want to sell to Mexicans". Then they put another bid for a home in the "new" community of Woodland Hills, Calif. Again, the developer did not want to sell to "mexicans". They finally moved to Redondo Bch. The couple became wildly successful in real estate and raised their children well, most likely wouldn't have happened in Texas.
Dude that's a one off situation. There are legions of very successful Mexican Americans of that era who made their fortunes here in Texas.
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Old 07-27-2013, 04:04 AM
 
Location: San Antonio Texas
11,435 posts, read 15,984,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Dude that's a one off situation. There are legions of very successful Mexican Americans of that era who made their fortunes here in Texas.
Who are you trying to fool? I am from a city that is well over half Mexican-American. I can tell you that not that many achieved "fortunes" here in Texas in those times. That's just the way it was. Most of us had blue collar jobs, certainly none in management roles, executive roles, etc. Some beat "the system" by opening up their own businesses. Many well known companies of today and governments never even bothered to hire minorities until the 1970s. Please stop trying to whitewash history.
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Old 07-27-2013, 09:05 AM
 
7,324 posts, read 8,171,512 times
Reputation: 5419
Quote:
Originally Posted by wehotex View Post
Who are you trying to fool? I am from a city that is well over half Mexican-American. I can tell you that not that many achieved "fortunes" here in Texas in those times. That's just the way it was. Most of us had blue collar jobs, certainly none in management roles, executive roles, etc. Some beat "the system" by opening up their own businesses. Many well known companies of today and governments never even bothered to hire minorities until the 1970s. Please stop trying to whitewash history.
Now you are simply moving the goal posts. Your acquaintance made her money in Calif working for herself. And she didn't make it until well after she got to Cali. - probably in the '80s and '90s and she encountered bigotry there.


1. I'm not trying to fool anyone
2. I'm Mexican American myself via lineage and from Texas - my great-great-grandfather came here with about $15 equivalent in the 1860s. Before he died he owned more than 100k acres of land across four states and untold head of livestock.
3. Maybe your town was different but Tejanos have variously been landowners, politicians, bankers lawyers, executives, managers since the 1800s. The King Ranch has had who knows how many Tejano managers over various operations going back to the 1800s. Heck an uncle of mine, he looked and sounded hispanic and had a 100% hispanic name, was a sales manager at west Texas car dealership for a long while in '60s and '70s.

Fire up your google and look up the Benavides Ranch, Quiros Ranch, Sanchez-O'Brien Oil, Henry Gonzalez (a big shot in San Antonio politics in the 1940s and 50s), The Fuentes family from San Angelo, and LOTS of others going back to the early 1800s Tejanos have been successful in Texas going back to the early 1800s.

I'm not going to claim there is no and has been no bigotry against TX-MX and others in Texas. My point is is to counter your claim that Tejanos couldn't succeed here until recently. Too many did.
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Old 07-27-2013, 01:11 PM
 
Location: San Antonio Texas
11,435 posts, read 15,984,530 times
Reputation: 5224
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Now you are simply moving the goal posts. Your acquaintance made her money in Calif working for herself. And she didn't make it until well after she got to Cali. - probably in the '80s and '90s and she encountered bigotry there.


1. I'm not trying to fool anyone
2. I'm Mexican American myself via lineage and from Texas - my great-great-grandfather came here with about $15 equivalent in the 1860s. Before he died he owned more than 100k acres of land across four states and untold head of livestock.
3. Maybe your town was different but Tejanos have variously been landowners, politicians, bankers lawyers, executives, managers since the 1800s. The King Ranch has had who knows how many Tejano managers over various operations going back to the 1800s. Heck an uncle of mine, he looked and sounded hispanic and had a 100% hispanic name, was a sales manager at west Texas car dealership for a long while in '60s and '70s.

Fire up your google and look up the Benavides Ranch, Quiros Ranch, Sanchez-O'Brien Oil, Henry Gonzalez (a big shot in San Antonio politics in the 1940s and 50s), The Fuentes family from San Angelo, and LOTS of others going back to the early 1800s Tejanos have been successful in Texas going back to the early 1800s.

I'm not going to claim there is no and has been no bigotry against TX-MX and others in Texas. My point is is to counter your claim that Tejanos couldn't succeed here until recently. Too many did.
Thanks. I've read that the Laredo ppl are kinda unique in that their popul and power structure was entirely Mex-American, so they didn't have the rampant discrimination that went on in other parts of the state. Heck, even Dr Hector Garcia had to attend a medical school in Nebraska because Univ of Texas Med School would only admit 1 or 2 mexican-americans each year. I appreciate the point that you're making. Maybe it's where I grew up?- Corpus Christi. When I was younger, other Mex-Americans from the real So Texas would comment that they thought that CC was redneck and backwoods. I didn't know why they thought that because I was conditioned to think that life there was "normal". But they must have thought otherwise for some reason. Maybe an older relative's personal experience there? I'm not sure. Compared to their 100% mex-american existence, maybe anything else appeared that way? Did your ancestor with the land have 100% mexican-american background?, Spanish surname? Half and Half?, Anglos surname? It's hard to imagine that the power structure and Anglo populace wouldn't try to swindle him out of his land.
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