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Old 08-07-2013, 08:13 AM
 
Location: NE Tarrant County, TX
394 posts, read 1,057,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveG99 View Post
Endless hotwater is fantastic.
Well, yes, there is an up side . LOL

-OMS
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Old 08-08-2013, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Blah
4,153 posts, read 7,655,301 times
Reputation: 3053
We upgraded both our tank heaters to tankless when ever one gave out. It was one of the best improvements we did to our home. Non stop hot water was a huge plus as well as they freed up extra space. The life expectancy is much longer a well. I would recommend them to anyone!
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Old 08-10-2013, 06:06 PM
 
2,256 posts, read 2,964,961 times
Reputation: 1215
As far as HOAs and solar panels, IMO I would never live in a development silly enough to ban solar panels on the roof. Preventing people from saving money and doing their part toward lowering their carbon footprint for some misplaced sense of "curb appeal" and homogeneity is ridiculous. Especially because newer style panels blend in much better with the roof and reduce the profile of the support structure underneath, this really isn't an issue anymore.

Come to think of it, that's probably why I'll never live in an HOA either.
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Old 08-10-2013, 07:20 PM
 
2,206 posts, read 3,797,085 times
Reputation: 2073
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidicarus89 View Post
As far as HOAs and solar panels, IMO I would never live in a development silly enough to ban solar panels on the roof. Preventing people from saving money and doing their part toward lowering their carbon footprint for some misplaced sense of "curb appeal" and
There is no way to get a return on an investment in solar panels. You might as well stack the money in a barrel and light it on fire.
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Old 08-10-2013, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Blah
4,153 posts, read 7,655,301 times
Reputation: 3053
Quote:
Originally Posted by TX75007 View Post
There is no way to get a return on an investment in solar panels. You might as well stack the money in a barrel and light it on fire.
Oh sure you can, well, your kids anyways, 20yrs after you kicked the bucket and your kids are ready to retire.
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Old 08-11-2013, 10:45 AM
 
2,256 posts, read 2,964,961 times
Reputation: 1215
Quote:
Originally Posted by TX75007 View Post
There is no way to get a return on an investment in solar panels. You might as well stack the money in a barrel and light it on fire.
I recommend you revisit price per watt estimates of solar panels-they continue to plummet pretty steeply. The key impetus holding widespread adoption of solar energy in Texas is that many providers don't pay homeowners for excess production that runs back into the grid. If the Legislature takes it up again and makes it mandatory for power companies to compensate people for extra electricity, couple that with local (generous) rebates in a lot of major cities and you can see a return in less than 10 years, maybe less if ultra-low natgas prices see any modest increase over the next decade.
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Old 08-11-2013, 11:10 AM
 
2,256 posts, read 2,964,961 times
Reputation: 1215
As a sidenote, Texas better get serious about renewable energy and natural gas power unless we want to start experiencing California-style brownouts. Rapidly increasing population size and insufficient investment in infrastructure and new generation (one of the downsides of deregulation) are not a good recipe for stability. But that's a topic for another thread.
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Old 08-11-2013, 03:17 PM
 
5,092 posts, read 9,608,910 times
Reputation: 3941
It is now 2013, heading towards 2014.

Update from this century to the curmudgeons from the last . . ..

Solar panels have been around for some decades, now.

Actual damage due to hail is very rare, as they tend to be tougher than the shingles underneath -- which they protect.

If this were not true, they would not be insurable.

As far as economics, we have installed them for some years now, where they are over 100% paid off in advance.

Real knowledge, real information -- get it, use it, share it, benefit from it.
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Old 08-11-2013, 03:22 PM
 
5,092 posts, read 9,608,910 times
Reputation: 3941
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidicarus89 View Post
As a sidenote, Texas better get serious about renewable energy and natural gas power unless we want to start experiencing California-style brownouts. Rapidly increasing population size and insufficient investment in infrastructure and new generation (one of the downsides of deregulation) are not a good recipe for stability. But that's a topic for another thread.
psssst. A little side secret to the sidenote --

While we in the power industry are grateful for the hype like this our marketing and (mis)informericals generate -- Electricity Generation is quite surplus and likely to stay that way for some time.
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Old 08-11-2013, 10:19 PM
 
2,206 posts, read 3,797,085 times
Reputation: 2073
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidicarus89 View Post
I recommend you revisit price per watt estimates of solar panels-they continue to plummet pretty steeply. The key impetus holding widespread adoption of solar energy in Texas is that many providers don't pay homeowners for excess production that runs back into the grid. If the Legislature takes it up again and makes it mandatory for power companies to compensate people for extra electricity, couple that with local (generous) rebates in a lot of major cities and you can see a return in less than 10 years, maybe less if ultra-low natgas prices see any modest increase over the next decade.
The main problem with solar is that the sun does not shine at the rated power output of solar panels except for a few hours each day in the summer. Furthermore, unless you can build an equatorial mount for all those panels so they can follow the sun, the sun almost never hits the panels at the most direct angle. Another problem is clouds and rainy days and dust and bird poop and proton migration. All this adds up to a very bad way to spend your money. And I have not even added in the costs of installation, the transfer switch gear, or the maintenance costs.

Its a waste of money.

You are better off building your home out of ICF and looking at other net zero technologies and putting your money there.
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