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Old 08-30-2013, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Funky town
951 posts, read 1,424,594 times
Reputation: 640

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple Shade View Post
All new houses in DFW come with a pier & beam foundation now? Is this a code requirement? Does pier & beam foundation never cause any problem? If that is the case then new construction does have more merit then I thought.
Incorrect in my opinion. Most new houses (true custom homes are only exceptions) are slabs. Pier and beam are always better for this soil. For example, soil movement (shrinkage and expansion is between 6-12 inches in Plano and east frisco die to rock base. Movement is as much as 18 inches in las colinas, carrolton (including castle hills) and little elm areas. There may be more areas but these are the areas I know about but I am not a structural engineer...
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Old 08-30-2013, 01:06 PM
 
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I guess if new construction doesn't offer quality built pier and beam option then its better to get an older home where foundation has settled. Why sign up for surprises.
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Old 08-30-2013, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Funky town
951 posts, read 1,424,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple Shade View Post
I guess if new construction doesn't offer quality built pier and beam option then its better to get an older home where foundation has settled. Why sign up for surprises.
There is nothing like foundation getting "settled" older homes need foundation repair because of stress fracture among other things over time that new homes don't need.
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Old 08-30-2013, 01:32 PM
 
1,542 posts, read 853,734 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple Shade View Post
I guess if new construction doesn't offer quality built pier and beam option then its better to get an older home where foundation has settled. Why sign up for surprises.
I meant piered slab. So it is still a slab, but constructed with piers underneath. Yes, it adds to the cost, but probably avoids the foundation repairs (putting piers in!) down the road.
From what I've seen the builders seem to use piered slab on biggest houses. I guess, a 10k sq. footer would literally just fall apart if you don't do piered slab.
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Old 08-30-2013, 05:07 PM
 
55 posts, read 66,053 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frenzyrider View Post
There is nothing like foundation getting "settled" older homes need foundation repair because of stress fracture among other things over time that new homes don't need.
Most of the stories that I have heard or read about foundation issues were about new subdivisions in Irving, Frisco, Plano, Castle Hills, Allen, Carrollton etc.
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Old 08-30-2013, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Funky town
951 posts, read 1,424,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple Shade View Post
Most of the stories that I have heard or read about foundation issues were about new subdivisions in Irving, Frisco, Plano, Castle Hills, Allen, Carrollton etc.
Coppell and other places have it too. Piered slab is just slabs given a fancy name but technology now is better than 10-15 years ago. I don't want to get too technical but Plano and east frisco have really good soil relatively (I think more asphalt chalk with thin layer of clay). The soil in this area moves 6-12 inches at 8000lbs/sqft up force. Whereas las colinas, carrolton, farmer's branch, little elm, valley ranch have soils that move 12-18 inches at 32000lb/sqft vertical up force so you can go figure what is right. A perfect storm of 30+ days 100 degree weather followed by 2 weeks of continuous rain will clear up the situation for you.

Just for reference, an avg 2 story 3500 sqft home exerts downward force of 600-800lbs/sqft. So yes, these upward movements can lift up an entire house eventually over time but most people get their foundation fixed.
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Old 08-30-2013, 09:38 PM
 
1,542 posts, read 853,734 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frenzyrider View Post
Coppell and other places have it too. Piered slab is just slabs given a fancy name but technology now is better than 10-15 years ago. I don't want to get too technical but Plano and east frisco have really good soil relatively (I think more asphalt chalk with thin layer of clay). The soil in this area moves 6-12 inches at 8000lbs/sqft up force. Whereas las colinas, carrolton, farmer's branch, little elm, valley ranch have soils that move 12-18 inches at 32000lb/sqft vertical up force so you can go figure what is right. A perfect storm of 30+ days 100 degree weather followed by 2 weeks of continuous rain will clear up the situation for you.

Just for reference, an avg 2 story 3500 sqft home exerts downward force of 600-800lbs/sqft. So yes, these upward movements can lift up an entire house eventually over time but most people get their foundation fixed.

I'm not saying it's perfect, but it is better than a floating slab. And yes, it would not help with upward movement. However most of the movement lately is downward! And the tests they do preconstruction mean nothing. Ten years later the little tree in the front yard is huge, and it's ten feet away, and it's drinking hundreds of gallons of water each day. So we know the outcome if you can't water.
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Old 09-23-2013, 01:20 AM
 
52 posts, read 191,581 times
Reputation: 78
Default Avignon Windhaven in Plano

This place is beautiful. I hate that my husband still has a year left on his contract.
I feel as if all of the homes will be gone.

I like Toll Brother houses here in Cali. The same square footage homes that are available for building in our similar community is nearly half the price at Avignon.

This is my Norris Canyon estate located in San Ramon, CA. It's not diverse but the schools are a 10 and it has Cali weather. ( The one thing I'm going to miss.)
Toll Brothers - Norris Canyon Estates

This is Avignon Windhaven located in the diverse city of Plano. The nearby schools are a 10, they're closer to stores, and the lots are bigger.
Toll Brothers - Avignon

I have family who is in love with the DFW metroplex. They talked me into looking and I have fallen in love with Plano.

What do you know about Avignon?
What's the deal with Plano? On paper, it seems perfect.
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Old 09-23-2013, 01:29 AM
 
52 posts, read 191,581 times
Reputation: 78
Default Example

Attachment 118460

Norris Canyon: 4921sq ft $1,516,995

Avignon Windheaven-pres_berk_tx_3spe_654_3_920.jpg

Avignon at Windhaven: 5030sq ft $809,995
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Old 09-23-2013, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 20,357,642 times
Reputation: 10188
Hello again and welcome to our fair city!

To be honest, to me, Plano is perfect. It's diverse, the schools are excellent, there is no crime to speak of, and it doesn't take long to get anywhere.

I'm not familiar with the specific subdivision you've listed, but I did look at the location. You would be in a prime location for schools, restaurants, and commuting.

Feel free to PM me if you have any Plano related questions.
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