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Old 09-13-2013, 11:20 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,323,184 times
Reputation: 4853

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
Elsewhere doesn't deal with our climate - extreme heat and lengthy droughts. We plant for our climate.
I used to live in Georgia. Most of the state doesn't have our heat, but they have had droughts. I'm sure there are better ways to deal with both. I suppose it depends on which part of the state you're in.
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Old 09-13-2013, 12:29 PM
 
3,810 posts, read 3,706,216 times
Reputation: 4106
Quote:
and public spaces aren't as clever as I've seen elsewhere
I'm not going to speak to lawns, but historically, Texas has had really lenient regulations at the city level for green space and trees and the like. Houston & Dallas both had almost no regulations for such things until enacted in the mid to late '90s, and the ones in place now are still very lenient compared to 'better landscaped' cities like Portland. I think the green cover requred in the Dallas area is about 10-15% of the property, and only one tree per 50 feet of linear sidewalk distance. Your average arborist would double those requirements for a hot climate like DFW. I can see Houston and Dallas improving these requirements in the not too distant future.

You can see the green space requirements for yourself: Compare your average giant parking lot built in the past to the ones done more recently. The difference in green cover is very noticeable.

Texas A&M has actually done very impressive work at finding plants and trees that work in a variety of situations and climates, and Texas cities are using that knowledge to improve the cost and maintenace of green space.
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Old 09-13-2013, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Dallas,Texas
5,270 posts, read 7,201,228 times
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I'd say Live Oak or Pecan. I have two Pecan trees in my yard, they are excellent shade trees.

Both Live Oak and Pecan are native to Texas, so they can take the extreme heat and long periods of drought.
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Old 09-14-2013, 08:41 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,323,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
I'm not going to speak to lawns, but historically, Texas has had really lenient regulations at the city level for green space and trees and the like. Houston & Dallas both had almost no regulations for such things until enacted in the mid to late '90s, and the ones in place now are still very lenient compared to 'better landscaped' cities like Portland. I think the green cover requred in the Dallas area is about 10-15% of the property, and only one tree per 50 feet of linear sidewalk distance. Your average arborist would double those requirements for a hot climate like DFW. I can see Houston and Dallas improving these requirements in the not too distant future.

You can see the green space requirements for yourself: Compare your average giant parking lot built in the past to the ones done more recently. The difference in green cover is very noticeable.

Texas A&M has actually done very impressive work at finding plants and trees that work in a variety of situations and climates, and Texas cities are using that knowledge to improve the cost and maintenace of green space.
I knew I wasn't the only one who noticed it. This state removes far too many of its trees and doesn't plant enough big ones. You'd think it's common sense in a state as hot as us.

Things are getting better, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallaz View Post
I'd say Live Oak or Pecan. I have two Pecan trees in my yard, they are excellent shade trees.

Both Live Oak and Pecan are native to Texas, so they can take the extreme heat and long periods of drought.
You'll be waiting forever for that live oak to grow, though.
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Old 09-14-2013, 11:18 AM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
29,930 posts, read 34,535,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
You'll be waiting forever for that live oak to grow, though.
Not really, a well watered and fertilized Red or Live oak can grow very well in a short time.

Pecan trees make a huge mess with all the stuff they drop. They are not a good landscape tree near a home.
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Old 09-14-2013, 08:08 PM
 
27,465 posts, read 44,959,956 times
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article in today's FTW paper about good trees for the area...
couldn't find it but did find this--interesting that quick growth is not top factor

The Garden Guru: Let’s talk trees | Neil Sperry | Dallas-Fort Worth Lifestyles News | ...
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Old 09-14-2013, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Grapevine, Texas
9,505 posts, read 19,511,098 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rakin View Post
Pecan trees make a huge mess with all the stuff they drop. They are not a good landscape tree near a home.
Totally agree. They make a huge mess. I would not want one on my property. The sap, nuts, and husks will ruin a car parked under the tree, and the nuts become projectiles if you run over them with a lawnmower!!
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Old 09-18-2013, 08:33 AM
 
Location: East Dallas
931 posts, read 1,744,440 times
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I like live oaks
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Old 09-18-2013, 08:43 AM
 
16,092 posts, read 35,784,302 times
Reputation: 6264
Any opinions on Chinese Pistache?
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Old 09-18-2013, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
2,828 posts, read 3,387,228 times
Reputation: 1815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallaz View Post
I'd say Live Oak or Pecan. I have two Pecan trees in my yard, they are excellent shade trees.
Until this time of year when the squirrels are trying to throw all the pecans at you!
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